Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for

  • Author or Editor: Lillian R. Aronson x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A sexually intact male Old English Sheepdog and a sexually intact female Bull Terrier were evaluated for renal dysplasia and chronic renal failure, respectively.

Clinical Findings—Both dogs were anemic and had high serum concentrations of urea nitrogen and creatinine. Electrolyte abnormalities (calcium and phosphorus) were also evident. The decision was made to pursue renal transplantation, and donor dogs were identified.

Treatment and Outcome—End-to-side anastomosis of the renal artery and vein of each donor's left kidney to the recipient's ipsilateral external iliac artery and vein, respectively, was performed. The left caudal abdominal musculature was scarified by making an incision, and nephropexy to that musculature was performed with a simple interrupted pattern of polypropylene sutures. No intraoperative or postoperative complications associated with the vascular anastomoses were encountered. Azotemia, anemia, and electrolyte imbalances resolved after transplantation.

Clinical Relevance—The end-to-side anastomosis technique described here, which is a preferred method in human medicine, was successful, providing an alternative to other renal transplantation techniques in dogs. Additional studies are needed to determine whether any vascular anastomosis technique is preferable for use in dogs requiring renal transplantation.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for azotemia and a suspected mass in the urinary bladder 6 weeks after receiving a renal transplant. Ultrasonography revealed a mass at the ureteroneocystostomy site, and the mass was excised. Both the donor and recipient cats were seronegative for Toxoplasma gondii–specific IgG antibodies prior to transplantation.

Clinical Findings—Histologic evaluation of the mass revealed lesions indicative of extensive necrotizing pyogranulomatous cystitis with numerous intralesional T gondii tachyzoites and bradyzoite cysts.

Treatment and Outcome—Treatment with clindamycin was initiated; however, the cat's clinical condition continued to decline, and it was euthanized 9 days after the mass was excised. Necropsy revealed T gondii cysts within the renal allograft and the transplanted ureter, with no evidence of systemic spread of organisms.

Clinical Relevance—Toxoplasmosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis for azotemia in feline renal transplant recipients regardless of the results of assays for T gondii antibodies in the serum of donors or recipients. This report illustrated the need for improved screening of donor and recipient cats and the importance of minimizing exposure to potential sources of T gondii after transplantation.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate features, treatment, and prognosis associated with retroperitoneal fibrosis that developed after renal transplantation in cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—29 cats.

Procedures—Medical records of cats that developed retroperitoneal fibrosis after renal transplantation at the College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, between 1998 and 2011 were reviewed for signalment, date of transplantation, age, results of urine and blood analyses, blood pressure at the time of diagnosis, infectious disease and medication anamneses, anesthetic protocols, and intraoperative complications.

Results—Of 138 transplant recipients, 29 (21%) developed clinically important retroperitoneal fibrosis. Nineteen (66%) were male, and median age at the time of renal transplantation was 8 years (range, 4 to 13 years). Median number of days after transplantation to diagnosis of retroperitoneal fibrosis was 62 (range, 4 to 730 days; mean, 125 days). The most common clinical signs were lethargy and anorexia. All affected cats were azotemic (BUN concentration > 32 mg/dL; creatinine concentration > 2.0 mg/dL) and anemic (PCV < 35%) at the time of retroperitoneal fibrosis diagnosis, although cats were nonazotemic at the time of discharge following transplantation, and anemia was less pronounced. Twenty-five cats successfully underwent surgical ureterolysis in which scar tissue was dissected away from the allograft ureter to relieve extraluminal compression. Retroperitoneal fibrosis recurred in 6 (22%) cats a median of 180 days (range, 8 to 343 days) following the original diagnosis and was treated successfully by repeated ureterolysis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Retroperitoneal fibrosis occurred in a substantial percentage of feline renal transplant recipients and should be considered a differential diagnosis in any feline renal transplant recipient with clinicopathologic findings, imaging abnormalities, or signs suggestive of obstructive uropathy.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of cyclosporine, dexamethasone, and the immunosuppressive agent human CTLA4-Ig on cytokine production by feline lymphocytes in vitro and to assess patterns of cytokine production for 5 immunosuppressed renal transplant recipient cats.

Animals—21 clinically normal cats and 5 immunosupressed renal transplant recipient cats.

Procedures—Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from clinically normal cats and stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A; 10 μg/mL) alone or Con A with cyclosporine (0.05 μg/mL), dexamethasone (1 × 10−7M), a combination of cyclosporine-dexamethasone, or human CTLA4-Ig (10 g/mL). Cells from transplant recipients were stimulated with Con A alone. An ELISA was performed to measure production of interferon (IFN)-γ, granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-10. Proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+T cells from immunosuppressed cats were also evaluated. Pairwise comparisons were performed via a Wilcoxon signed rank test or Wilcoxon rank sum test.

Results—Cyclosporine, dexamethasone, cyclosporine-dexamethasone combination, and CTLA4-Ig caused a significant decrease in IL-2, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF production. Cyclosporine and cyclosporine-dexamethasone, but not human CTLA4-Ig, caused a significant decrease in IL-10 production. High basal concentrations of IL-2 and IL-10 were identified in transplant recipients, and IL-10 was significantly increased in stimulated cultures. In immunosuppressed cats, there was a decrease in frequency of responders and proliferative capacity of CD4+ and CD8+T cells.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—CTLA4-Ig successfully inhibited proinflammatory cytokines while sparing cytokines critical for allograft tolerance. These data may be useful for developing better strategies to prevent rejection while sparing other immune functions.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 1-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for a sternal defect and ventral abdominal wall hernia.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The cat appeared healthy. Palpation revealed a sternal defect, and the heart could be observed beating underneath the skin at the caudoventral aspect of the thorax. A 3-cm-diameter freely movable mass, consistent with a hernia, was also palpated at the cranioventral aspect of the abdomen. Thoracic radiographic and CT images revealed a sternal cleft, cranial midline abdominal wall hernia, and peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH).

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Thoracotomy and celiotomy were performed. The sternal cleft was repaired with a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft, titanium contourable mesh plate, and interrupted 25-gauge cerclage wires. A diaphragmatic herniorrhaphy was used to correct the PPDH. Thoracic radiographs were obtained immediately after surgery to confirm repair of the sternal cleft, abdominal wall hernia, and PPDH and at 1 and 3 months after surgery to assess the surgical implants, which had not migrated and were intact with only mild bending at the cranial and caudal margins of the mesh plate. At both recheck examinations, the cat appeared healthy with no complications reported by the owner.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A novel surgical technique was used to successfully repair a large sternal cleft in an adult cat with no postoperative complications reported. This technique may be useful for the treatment of sternal clefts in other cats. This was the first report to describe an adult cat with congenital defects consistent with incomplete pentalogy of Cantrell.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

6-month-old and 7-month-old spayed female domestic shorthair cats were referred because of complications associated with inadvertent bilateral ureteral ligation and transection during ovariohysterectomy.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Both cats had a 1- to 2-day history of lethargy, inappetence, and vomiting. Initial exam findings included lethargy, signs of abdominal pain, anuria, and dehydration. Clinicopathologic testing revealed azotemia and hyperkalemia. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed peritoneal effusion and bilateral pyelectasia in both cats and retroperitoneal effusion in one. Fluid analysis in both cats supported a diagnosis of uroabdomen.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Exploratory celiotomy was performed in both cats, and bilateral ureteral ligation and transection was confirmed. Bilateral renal descensus and ureteroneocystostomy with an intravesicular mucosal apposition technique was successfully performed in both cats. Clinicopathologic evaluation performed 1 day after surgery in one cat and 5 days after surgery in the other revealed complete resolution of azotemia. Ultrasonographic examination of the urogenital tract performed approximately 4 months after surgery in the first cat and 1 month after surgery in the second cat revealed complete resolution of renal pelvic dilation bilaterally.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Bilateral intravesicular ureteroneocystostomy in conjunction with bilateral renal descensus was used successfully to treat bilateral ureteral transection that occurred in 2 cats during routine ovariohysterectomy. Limited treatment options currently exist for this serious complication, and euthanasia is often considered. This technique, which relies on the use of the natural surrounding tissues for successful treatment, can offer a potential treatment option to correct this uncommon but devastating complication.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate and compare outcomes in cats following ureteral surgery or ureteral stent placement.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 117 cats.

PROCEDURES Data regarding signalment, history, concurrent disease, clinical signs, clinicopathologic tests, surgical procedures, and perioperative complications (including death) were recorded. Follow-up data, including presence of signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease, chronic urinary tract infection, reobstruction, and death, if applicable, were obtained by records review or telephone contact with owners. Variables of interest were compared statistically between cats treated with and without stent placement. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression were performed to assess differences in survival time between cats with and without ureteral stents.

RESULTS Perioperative complications referable to the urinary tract were identified in 6 of 43 (14%) cats that had ≥ 1 ureteral stent placed and 2 of 74 (3%) cats that underwent ureteral surgery without stenting. Perioperative mortality rates were similar between cats with (4/43 [9%]) and without (6/74 [8%]) stents. After surgery, signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease and chronic urinary tract infection were significantly more common among cats with than cats without stents. Nineteen of 87 (22%) cats with follow-up information available had recurrent obstruction; incidence of reobstruction did not differ between cats with and without stents. Median survival time did not differ between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The potential for signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease and chronic infection, particularly among cats that receive ureteral stents, warrants appropriate client counseling. Judicious long-term follow-up for detection of reobstruction is recommended.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the utility of ultrasonography to detect the cause and location of ureteral obstruction in cats and to identify factors associated with agreement between ultrasonographic and surgical findings.

STUDY DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 71 cats.

PROCEDURES Medical records were searched to identify cats that had ureteral obstruction diagnosed ultrasonographically and that subsequently underwent exploratory laparotomy. Patient signalment, ultrasonographic findings, interventions performed, and surgical findings were recorded. Cause and location of ureteral obstruction as assessed by ultrasonography were compared with surgical findings. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of ultrasonography for detection of ureteroliths and strictures were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to identify factors associated with agreement between ultrasonographic and surgical findings.

RESULTS There was significant, moderate agreement between ultrasonographic and surgical findings for the cause and location of ureteral obstruction. Signalment variables, ureter affected (left vs right), and presence of retroperitoneal effusion were not associated with this agreement. Sensitivity was 98% and 44%, specificity was 96% and 98%, and positive predictive value was 98% and 88% for detection of ureteroliths and strictures, respectively, by ultrasonography.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Ultrasonography was highly sensitive for detection of ureteroliths that caused ureteral obstruction but was considerably less sensitive for detection of ureteral strictures in the study population. Future prospective studies are needed to determine the role of advanced imaging in assessing cats with ureteral abnormalities. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2019;254:710–715)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association