Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Lewis S. Gaffney x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine effects of bite depth for placement of an epitendinous suture on the biomechanical strength and gap formation of repaired canine tendons.

SAMPLE

48 superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) obtained from 24 canine cadavers.

PROCEDURES

Tendons were assigned to 3 groups (16 tendons/group). Each SDFT was transected and then repaired with a continuous epitendinous suture placed with a bite depth of 1, 2, or 3 mm for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Specimens were loaded to failure. Failure mode, gap formation, yield force, peak force, and failure force were analyzed.

RESULTS

Yield, peak, and failure forces differed significantly between groups 1 and 3 and groups 2 and 3 but not between groups 1 and 2. Comparison of the force resisted at 1 and 3 mm of gapping revealed a significant difference between groups 1 and 3 and groups 2 and 3 but not between groups 1 and 2. Failure mode did not differ among groups; suture pull-through occurred in 43 of 48 (89.6%) specimens.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Increasing bite depth of an epitendinous suture toward the center of the tendon substance increased repair site strength and decreased the incidence of gap formation. Repair of tendon injuries in dogs by use of an epitendinous suture with bites made deep into the tendon should result in a stronger repair, which potentially would allow loading and rehabilitation to begin sooner after surgery. Suture techniques should be investigated in vivo to determine effects on tendinous healing and blood supply before clinical implementation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of a continuous locking novel epitendinous suture (nES) pattern with and without a core locking-loop (LL) suture on the biomechanical properties of ex vivo canine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) tenorrhaphy constructs.

SAMPLE

54 cadaveric forelimb SDFTs from 27 musculoskeletally normal adult dogs.

PROCEDURES

Tendons were assigned to 3 groups (18 SDFTs/group): sharply transected and repaired with a core LL suture alone (group 1), an nES pattern alone (group 2), or a combination of a core LL suture and nES pattern (group 3). All constructs underwent a single load-to-failure test. Yield, peak, and failure loads; gap formation incidence; and mode of failure were compared among the 3 groups.

RESULTS

Mean yield, peak, and failure loads differed significantly among the 3 groups and were greatest for group 3 and lowest for group 1. Mean yield, peak, and failure loads for group 3 constructs were greater than those for group 1 constructs by 50%, 47%, and 44%, respectively. None of the group 3 constructs developed 3-mm gaps. The most common mode of failure was suture pulling through the tendon for groups 1 (12/18) and 2 (12/18) and suture breakage for group 3 (13/18).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested augmentation of a core LL suture with an nES pattern significantly increased the strength of and prevented 3-mm gap formation at the tenorrhaphy site in ex vivo canine SDFTs. In vivo studies are necessary to assess the effectiveness and practicality of the nES pattern for SDFT repair in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the biomechanical strength and incidence of gap formation among canine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) constructs that underwent core tenorrhaphy only and those in which the core tenorrhaphy was augmented with skin staples or a continuous Silfverskiold cross-stitch (SXS) suture pattern.

SAMPLE

42 cadaveric forelimb SDFTs from 21 musculoskeletally normal dogs.

PROCEDURES

Tendons were randomly assigned to 3 groups (14 SDTFs/group), sharply transected, and repaired with a core locking-loop suture alone (group 1) or augmented with circumferential placement of skin staples (group 2) or a continuous SXS suture pattern (group 3) in the epitenon. All constructs underwent a single load-to-failure test. Yield, peak, and failure loads, incidence of gap formation, and mode of failure were compared among the 3 groups.

RESULTS

Mean yield, peak, and failure loads differed significantly among experimental groups and were greatest for group 3 and lowest for group 1 constructs. The incidence of gap formation differed among the tested groups and was lowest for group 3 and highest for group 1. The most common mode of construct failure was the suture pulling through the tendon for group 1, staple deformation for group 2, and epitendinous suture breakage for group 3.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated epitendinous placement of skin staples around a core SDFT tenorrhaphy site improved the biomechanical strength and resistance to gap formation for the repair but was inferior to epitendinous placement of SXS sutures. Further research is necessary before skin staples are used for tenorrhaphy augmentation in clinical patients.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research