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  • Author or Editor: Leslie E. Fox x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine response rates and survival times for cats with lymphoma treated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison chemotherapy protocol.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—38 cats with lymphoma.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed, and information on age, sex, breed, FeLV and FIV infection status, anatomic form, clinical stage, and survival time was obtained. Immunophenotyping was not performed.

Results—Mean ± SD age of the cats was 10.9 ± 4.4 years. Overall median survival time was 210 days (interquartile range, 90 to 657 days), and overall duration of first remission was 156 days (interquartile range, 87 to 316 days). Age, sex, anatomic form, and clinical stage were not significantly associated with duration of first remission or survival time. Eighteen of the 38 (47%) cats had complete remission, 14 (37%) had partial remission, and 6 (16%) had no response. Duration of first remission was significantly longer for cats with complete remission (654 days) than for cats with partial remission (114 days). Median survival time for cats with complete remission (654 days) was significantly longer than median survival time for cats with partial remission (122 days) and for cats with no response (11 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that a high percentage of cats with lymphoma will respond to treatment with the University of Wisconsin-Madison chemotherapy protocol. Age, sex, anatomic form, and clinical stage were not significantly associated with duration of first response or survival time, but initial response to treatment was. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:1118–1122)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of administration of 1 dose of tulathromycin on the incidence of various diseases and growth, identify risk factors for slow growth, and determine the association of Mycoplasma bovis status with the incidence of otitis media in calves.

Design—Randomized controlled trial and cross-sectional study.

Animals—788 dairy heifer calves (median age, 3 days).

Procedures—Calves received tulathromycin or a saline (0.9% NaCl) solution control treatment once. Calves were observed daily for 8 weeks by farm staff to detect diseases. Nasal swab specimens were collected from some calves for Mycoplasma spp culture.

Results—Tulathromycin-treated calves had significantly lower odds of developing otitis media (OR, 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.82) versus control calves. Control calves had significantly higher odds of developing diarrhea (OR, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 2.6) versus tulathromycin-treated calves. Control calves and those with failure of passive transfer, fever, lameness, respiratory tract disease, or diarrhea had significantly lower average daily gain versus other calves. Seventeen of the 66 (26%) calves that underwent repeated testing had positive Mycoplasma spp culture results, but positive results were not associated with otitis media. One of 42 calves with otitis media tested for Mycoplasma spp had positive results, and 1 of 43 age-matched calves without otitis media had positive results.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tulathromycin-treated calves in this study had a lower incidence of diarrhea and otitis media versus control calves. Various diseases had negative effects on average daily gain. Mycoplasma bovis status was not associated with otitis media in calves.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether thalidomide inhibits the growth of primary and pulmonary metastatic canine osteosarcoma in mice after xenotransplantation.

Animals—Athymic nude mice.

Procedure—Canine osteosarcoma cells were injected SC in 50 mice. Mice were randomly placed into the following groups: control group (n = 13; DMSO [drug vehicle] alone [0.1 mL/d, IP]); low-dose group (12; thalidomide [100 mg/kg, IP]), mid-dose group (13; thalidomide [200 mg/kg, IP]); and high-dose group (12; thalidomide [400 mg/kg, IP]). Starting on day 8, treatments were administered daily and tumor measurements were performed for 20 days. On day 28, mice were euthanatized and primary tumors were weighed. Lungs were examined histologically to determine the number of mice with metastasis and tumor emboli. Mean area of the pulmonary micrometastatic foci was determined for mice from each group.

Results—Primary tumor size and weight were not significantly different among groups. The number of mice in the mid-dose (200 mg/kg) and high-dose (400 mg/kg) groups with micrometastasis was significantly less than the number of control group mice; however, the number of mice with tumor emboli was not affected by thalidomide treatment. Size of micrometastasis lesions was not affected by thalidomide treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Mean area of micrometastases was not affected by treatment; however, growth of micrometastases had not yet reached an angiogenesis-dependent size. Although thalidomide did not affect growth of primary tumors in mice after xenotransplantation of canine osteosarcoma cells, our findings indicate that thalidomide may interfere with the ability of embolic tumor cells to complete the metastatic process within the lungs. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:659–664)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate pituitary-adrenal function in a population of critically ill dogs by measuring serial plasma concentrations of basal cortisol, ACTH-stimulated cortisol, and endogenous ACTH.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—20 critically ill dogs admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU).

Procedure—Basal plasma cortisol, ACTH-stimulated cortisol, and endogenous ACTH concentrations were measured for each dog within 24 hours of admission and daily until death, euthanasia, or discharge from the ICU. Established reference ranges for healthy dogs were used for comparison. Survival prediction index (SPI) scores were calculated for each dog within 24 hours of admission.

Results—No significant difference was found between initial concentrations of basal cortisol, ACTH-stimulated cortisol, and endogenous ACTH in 13 dogs that survived and those in 7 dogs that died. High initial basal endogenous ACTH concentrations were correlated with subsequent high values. Low basal ACTH-stimulated cortisol concentrations were predictive of higher subsequent values. All basal and ACTH-stimulated cortisol concentrations were within or above the reference range in the 52 plasma samples collected from the 20 dogs during hospitalization. The SPI scores correlated with outcome (ie, alive or dead), but none of the plasma hormone concentrations correlated with SPI score or outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that none of the critically ill dogs in our study population developed adrenal insufficiency during hospitalization in the ICU. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:615–619)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To determine the effects of racing and training on serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in Greyhounds.

Animals—9 adult racing Greyhounds.

Procedure—Serum thyroid hormone concentrations were measured before and 5 minutes after a race in dogs trained to race 500m twice weekly for 6 months. Resting concentrations were measured again when these dogs had been neutered and had not raced for 3 months. Postrace concentrations were adjusted relative to albumin concentration to allow for effects of hemoconcentration. Thyroid hormone concentrations were then compared with those of clinically normal dogs of non-Greyhound breeds.

Results—When adjusted for hemoconcentration, total T4 concentrations increased significantly after racing and TSH concentrations decreased; however, there was no evidence of a change in free T4 or total or free T3 concentrations. Resting total T4 concentrations increased significantly when dogs had been neutered and were not in training. There was no evidence that training and neutering affected resting TSH, total or free T3, or free T4 concentrations. Resting concentrations of T3, TSH, and autoantibodies against T4, T3, and thyroglobulin were similar to those found in other breeds; however, resting free and total T4 concentrations were lower than those found in other breeds.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Except for total T4, thyroid hormone concentrations in Greyhounds are affected little by sprint racing and training. Greyhounds with low resting total and free T4 concentrations may not be hypothyroid. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1969–1972)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical response and toxic effects of cis-bis-neodecanoato-trans-R,R-1,2- diaminocyclohexane platinum (II) (L-NDDP) administered IV at escalating doses to cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).

Animals—18 cats with oral SCC.

Procedure—Cats that failed to respond to conventional treatment or had nonresectable tumors were included. Data included a CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, cytologic examination of a fineneedle aspirate of enlarged lymph nodes, and thoracic and oral radiographs for clinical staging. A starting dose (75 to 100 mg/m2 of L-NDDP) was administered IV. At 21-day intervals, subsequent doses increased by the rate of 5 or 10 mg/m2. Response was evaluated every 21 days by tumor measurement and thoracic radiography. Quality of life was assessed by owners, using a performance status questionnaire.

Results—On average, cats received 2 treatments. Toxicoses included an intermittent, acute anaphylactoid- parasympathomimetic reaction, lethargy or sedation (≤ 24 hours), inappetence or signs of depression (≤ 72 hours), mild to moderate increase in hepatic enzyme activity, and melena. Pulmonary, renal, or hematopoietic abnormalities were not evident. Performance status surveys indicated normal behavior and grooming or decreased activity and self-care (19/20 assessments), ate well with or without assistance (15/20), and did not lose weight (15/20). Median survival time was 59.8 days (mean, 54.1 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—L-NDDP was ineffective for treatment of cats with oral SCC. None of the cats had a complete or partial remission. Acute toxicoses and poor therapeutic response limit therapeutic usefulness of L-NDDP in cats, unless dosage, frequency, and administration procedures can be improved. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 791–795)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare complications and outcome following unilateral, staged bilateral, and single-stage bilateral ventral bulla osteotomy (VBO) in cats.

ANIMALS

282 client-owned cats treated by VBO at 25 veterinary referral and academic hospitals from 2005 through 2016.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of cats were reviewed to collect information on signalment, clinical signs, diagnostic test results, surgical and postoperative management details, complications (anesthetic, surgical, and postoperative), and outcome. Associations were evaluated among selected variables.

RESULTS

Unilateral, staged bilateral, and single-stage bilateral VBO was performed in 211, 7, and 64 cats, respectively, representing 289 separate procedures. Eighteen (9%), 2 (29%), and 30 (47%) of these cats, respectively, had postoperative respiratory complications. Cats treated with single-stage bilateral VBO were significantly more likely to have severe respiratory complications and surgery-related death than cats treated with other VBO procedures. Overall, 68.2% (n = 197) of the 289 procedures were associated with Horner syndrome (19.4% permanently), 30.1% (87) with head tilt (22.1% permanently), 13.5% (39) with facial nerve paralysis (8.0% permanently), and 6.2% (18) with local disease recurrence. Cats with (vs without) Horner syndrome, head tilt, and facial nerve paralysis before VBO had 2.6, 3.3, and 5.6 times the odds, respectively, of having these conditions permanently.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings suggested that staged bilateral VBO should be recommended over single-stage bilateral VBO for cats with bilateral middle ear disease. Cats with Horner syndrome, head tilt, and facial nerve paralysis before surgery were more likely to have these conditions permanently following surgery than were cats without these conditions.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association