Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Lawrence G. Carbone x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Summary

We examined the efficacy of ivermectin in the control of ear mites (Psoroptes cuniculi) in rabbits. The study involved 40 female and 35 male rabbits that were known to be naturally infested with ear mites. After a period of acclimation to the animal care facilities, the rabbits were ranked on the visual appearance of any ear lesion and the number of mites on glycerin-dipped ear swabs. The rabbits were then randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups; vehicle only (group 1), 50 µg of ivermectin/kg of body weight (group 2), 100 µg of ivermectin/kg (group 3) and 200 µg of ivermectin/kg (group 4). The rabbits were treated by SC injections on day 0 and day 14 of the trial; thus, the total dose of ivermectin given to groups 1 through 4, was 0, 100, 200, or 400 µg/kg, respectively. The study ended 2 weeks after the last treatment. Ear lesions of the treated rabbits improved significantly (P<0.001). By 28 days after the first treatment, the mean number of mites on the ear swabs (both ears) was 57.5 for untreated rabbits and 9.1, 0.5, and 2.5, respectively, for rabbits in groups 2, 3, and 4. The mean number of mites recovered from the ears of the untreated rabbits at necropsy was 24,297. For groups 2, 3, and 4, the mean number of mites recovered from the ears was 5,352, 96, and 96, respectively. The efficacy of treatment with a total dose of 100 µg/kg was 77.96%, with 200 µg/kg was 99.61%, and for 400 µg/ kg was 99.61%.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Studies were undertaken to determine the efficacy of milbemycin oxime against the enteric adult stages of Trichinella spiralis and of albendazole against the muscle stage larvae in experimentally infected dogs and cats. Specific-pathogen-free Beagle pups (n = 6) and domestic shorthair kittens (n = 6) were inoculated with 7,500 first-stage larvae of Trichinella spiralis. Physical examination (including collection of blood and fecal samples) was performed weekly. During the first week after inoculation, all animals had mild gastrointestinal tract disturbances, but stages of T spiralis were not observed in the feces. Beginning on postinoculation day (pid) 10, 3 pups and 3 kittens were treated with milbemycin oxime (1.25 mg/kg of body weight, po, q 12 h) for 10 days. Muscle biopsy specimens were taken from dogs and cats on pid 26 and 29, respectively. Mean numbers of larvae per gram of muscle were 30.3 in the control and 37.7 in the treated dogs. Mean numbers of larvae per gram of muscle in the control and treated cats were 318.7 and 89.3, respectively. Two dogs and 2 cats were removed from the study at that time. The remaining animals, 2 each of the control and milbemycin oxime-treated animals, were given albendazole (50 mg/kg, po, q 12 h) for 7 days starting at pid 31 and 34 in dogs and cats, respectively. Muscle biopsy specimens were again taken at pid 46 and 49, for dogs and cats, respectively; mean numbers of larvae recovered from muscle were 0.6 for dogs and 13.5 for cats.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research