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Abstract

Objective—To describe signalment, clinical findings, diagnostic tests, and results of treatment of dogs and cats with ovarian remnant syndrome (ORS).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—19 dogs and 2 cats with ORS.

Procedures—Medical records for animals examined between June 2000 and October 2007 were reviewed for signalment, clinical signs, age at time of ovariohysterectomy (OHE), surgical findings during OHE, experience of the surgeon (veterinary student vs veterinarian), interval from OHE until diagnosis of ORS, results of diagnostic tests, surgical findings, and results of histologic examination of excised tissues.

Results—21 animals (19 dogs and 2 cats) with ORS were identified. The most common clinical signs were those associated with proestrus and estrus. More dogs than cats were affected, and all residual ovarian tissues were found in the region of the ovarian pedicles. The right ovary in dogs was affected significantly more often than the left ovary. Seven animals had neoplasms of the reproductive system. These animals had a significantly longer interval between OHE and diagnosis of ORS than did the 14 animals without neoplasms. Long-term follow-up of 18 animals revealed resolution of clinical signs following exploratory laparotomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ovarian remnants were found in typical locations for ovaries and were not considered ectopic tissue; thus, surgical error during OHE was suspected as the cause of ORS. Anatomic differences may account for differences between species, and clinical signs may not be recognized until years after OHE. Surgical removal of residual ovarian tissue resulted in resolution of clinical signs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe the clinical signs, physical examination findings, clinical laboratory abnormalities, etiology, and outcome in cats with spontaneous hemoperitoneum.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—65 client-owned cats with spontaneous hemoperitoneum.

Procedures—Medical records of cats with spontaneous hemoperitoneum at 7 large referral clinics were reviewed. Cats were included if a definitive diagnosis of spontaneous hemoperitoneum could be obtained from review of the medical records.

Results—65 cats met inclusion criteria. The most common historical findings were lethargy, anorexia, and vomiting. Common findings on physical examination included inadequate hydration status and hypothermia. The most common clinicopathologic abnormalities were high serum AST activity, anemia, prolonged prothrombin time, and prolonged partial thromboplastin time. Forty-six percent (30/65) of cats had abdominal neoplasia, and 54% (35/65) had nonneoplastic conditions. Hemangiosarcoma was the most often diagnosed neoplasm (18/30; 60%), and the spleen was the most common location for neoplasia (11/30; 37%). Eight cats survived to be discharged from the hospital. Cats with neoplasia were significantly older and had significantly lower PCVs than cats with non-neoplastic disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Spontaneous hemoperitoneum in cats often results in debilitating clinical consequences. In contrast to dogs with hemoperitoneum, the cause of hemoperitoneum in cats is approximately evenly distributed between neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases. Although only a few cats were treated in this study, the prognosis appears poor.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Viewpoint articles represent the opinions of the authors and do not represent AVMA endorsement of such statements.

Introduction

Antimicrobial stewardship has been defined for the veterinary profession as “the actions veterinarians take individually and as a profession to preserve the effectiveness and availability of antimicrobial drugs through conscientious oversight and responsible medical decision-making while safeguarding animal, public, and environmental health.” 1 These actions may include making a commitment in one’s veterinary practice by assigning a staff member to track stewardship activities, selecting antimicrobials in a judicious and evidence-based manner, or attending continuing education about antimicrobial use (AMU) decision-making. The

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association