Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Laurel E. Redding x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To explore owners’ knowledge of and experiences with antimicrobial treatment of their pets and their perceptions of veterinarian-led antimicrobial stewardship initiatives.

DESIGN Cross-sectional study.

SAMPLE 25 pet owners visiting 1 of 3 clinic types (tertiary care, general practice, or low cost) in the greater Philadelphia area.

PROCEDURES Semistructured interviews were conducted with pet owners to gather responses related to the study objectives. Responses were transcribed and analyzed by means of conventional content analysis.

RESULTS Although participants were mostly unfamiliar with the mechanisms of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance, they generally understood what constituted the inappropriate use of antimicrobials. Few pet owners appeared concerned about the risk of antimicrobial resistance, and no owners were concerned that antimicrobials used for people were also used for pets. Overall, pet owners reported closely following veterinarians’ directions when administering antimicrobials at home, and the main reasons for not following directions included difficulty administering the medication and concern about overmedicating the pet. Most (21/25 [84%]) pet owners expressed trust in their veterinarian to meet their pets’ medical needs and prescribe antimicrobials appropriately. However, in situations when it was unclear whether antimicrobials would be effective, most owners nevertheless wanted their pet to receive them. Initiatives to promote the judicious use of antimicrobials, such as microbial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing and formal stewardship programs, were generally well received and appreciated by owners.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Considerable opportunity was identified to leverage the trust that exists between veterinarians and pet owners to promote the judicious use of antimicrobials for pets.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize antimicrobial prescribing patterns of clinicians and clinical services at a large animal veterinary teaching hospital and identify factors associated with antimicrobial prescribing.

ANIMALS

All large animals (ie, equids, bovids, sheep, goats, camelids, swine, and cervids) evaluated at the New Bolton Center hospital at the University of Pennsylvania from 2013 through 2018.

PROCEDURES

In a cross-sectional study design, data on antimicrobial use by clinicians and clinical services were collected from administrative and billing records. Multivariable regression modeling was performed to identify factors associated with antimicrobial prescribing patterns.

RESULTS

Antimicrobials and critically important antimicrobials of the highest priority were dispensed in 42.1% (9,853/23,428) and 24.0% (2,360/9,853) of visits, respectively, and these proportions differed significantly among clinicians. Per visit, the median (interquartile [25th to 75th percentile] range) number of animal-defined daily doses dispensed was 3.6 (0.8 to 11.1) and the mean (SD) number of antimicrobial classes dispensed was 2.0 (1.3). Patient species, age, affected body system, and duration of hospitalization as well as submission of specimens for bacterial culture were significantly associated with prescribing patterns.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The frequency and quantity of antimicrobials prescribed differed significantly among clinicians within and across services, even for animals with clinical signs affecting the same body system. Patient- and visit-level factors explained some but not all of the heterogeneity in prescribing patterns, suggesting that other clinician-specific factors drove such practices. More research is needed to better understand antimicrobial prescribing patterns of clinicians, particularly in situations for which no antimicrobial use guidelines have been established.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize antimicrobial use on four racetracks in the eastern US during the peak racing 2017–2018 seasons.

PROCEDURES

Handwritten daily treatment sheets provided by attending veterinarians who listed treatments administered to horses stabled at the racetrack were obtained. Information contained in the treatment sheets included the date, name of the horse and its trainer, type of treatment, and a brief (usually 1-word) indication for treatment. The handwritten data listed on the racetrack treatment sheets were manually transcribed and analyzed.

RESULTS

A total of 2,684 antimicrobial prescriptions were recorded, representing 6.8% of all drug treatments. The most frequently prescribed antimicrobials were enrofloxacin, with 854 prescriptions (31.8% of antimicrobial treatments), followed by gentamicin (570 [21.2%] prescriptions), ceftiofur (388 [14.5%] prescriptions,), and penicillin (220 [8.2%] prescriptions). The relative frequencies of antimicrobial class and indication for treatment varied significantly by racetrack and by prescribing veterinarian. Limitations associated with the data precluded ascertainment of the proportion of horses treated or exact indications for treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Antimicrobials appeared to be prescribed relatively infrequently at racetracks relative to other drugs, but highly or critically important antimicrobials were most often used. The appropriateness of use of these drugs remains unknown.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate the number of patients linked to vet-shopping behavior (the solicitation of controlled substance prescriptions from multiple veterinarians for misuse) in the United States using 2014–2019 data and characterize mandates for veterinarians to examine prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) before prescribing controlled substances as of April 2021.

SAMPLE

National database reporting prescription dispensing from 92% of US pharmacies from 2014 through 2019.

PROCEDURES

The annual number of patients with dispensed prescriptions for opioid analgesics, opioid cough-and-cold medications, or benzodiazepines from ≥ 4 veterinarians was calculated. State veterinary medical associations were contacted for information on veterinarian PDMP use mandates.

RESULTS

From 2014 through 2019, the number of patients with prescriptions for any class of controlled substances from ≥ 4 veterinarians tripled from 935 to 2,875 (+207.5%). The number of patients with opioid cough-and-cold medication prescriptions from ≥ 4 veterinarians rose from 150 to 1,348 (+798.9%). The corresponding number for benzodiazepines rose from 185 to 440 (+137.8%). The corresponding number for opioid analgesics peaked at 868 in 2016 before decreasing to 733 in 2019. In April 2021, 10 states mandated veterinarians to examine PDMP records of owners or animals before prescribing controlled substances; 3 mandates excluded benzodiazepines.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Vet shopping in the US may be increasingly common. Mandates for veterinarians to examine PDMPs before prescribing controlled substances might facilitate detection of this behavior. However, benefits of mandates should be weighed against their potential burden on veterinarians.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research