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  • Author or Editor: Larry M. Cornelius x
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SUMMARY

Mean carnitine concentrations ([carnitine]) were higher (P < 0.05) in adult cats than in kittens for skeletal muscle (total and free carnitine), myocardium (free carnitine), and urine (total and free carnitine). The free/total carnitine ratio was lower (P < 0.05) in kittens than in adults for liver, myocardium, and urine. Carnitine concentrations were similar between genders in kittens, but in adult cats, [carnitine] in plasma (total, free, and esterified carnitine) and liver (total and free carnitine) were higher (P < 0.05) in female than in male cats. Total and free plasma [carnitine] were correlated to total and free liver [carnitine], respectively. Skeletal muscle [carnitine] was not correlated to plasma [carnitine]. Correlations in [carnitine] between plasma and myocardium, kidney, or urine were inconsistent.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Hepatobiliary scintigraphy provides a noninvasive assessment of hepatobiliary structure and function, and has been used extensively in people. Hepatocellular measurements determined in the cats of this study include cardiac washout (≤ 2 minutes) and time of maximal hepatic activity (≤ 5 minutes) and hepatic washout (≤ 30 minutes). The gallbladder response to synthetic cholecystokinin was determined to be ≤ 3 minutes. Additional measurements also were identified. Potential use of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in feline medicine is discussed.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research