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  • Author or Editor: L. Michael Schmall x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of 0.005% latanoprost solution on intraocular pressure (IOP) of eyes of clinically normal horses and establish the frequency of adverse effects of drug administration.

Animals—20 adult clinically normal horses.

Procedure—IOP was recorded (7, 9, and 11 AM; 3, 5, and 7 PM) on days 1 and 2 (baseline), days 3 to 7 (treatment), and days 8 to 9 (follow-up). Latanoprost was administered to 1 randomly assigned eye of each horse every 24 hours during the treatment period, following the 7 AM IOP recording. Pupil size and the presence or absence of conjunctival hyperemia, epiphora, blepharospasm, blepharedema, and aqueous flare were recorded prior to IOP measurement.

Results—IOP was reduced from baseline by a mean value of 1.03 mm Hg (5%) in males and 3.01 mm Hg (17%) in females during the treatment period. Miosis developed in all treated eyes and was moderate to marked in 77% of horses, with the peak effect observed 4 to 8 hours after drug administration. Conjunctival hyperemia, epiphora, blepharospasm, and blepharedema were present in 100, 57, 42, and 12% of treated eyes, respectively, 2 to 24 hours following drug administration. Aqueous flare was not observed at any time point.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although IOP was reduced with every 24-hour dosing of latanoprost, the frequency of prostaglandin-induced adverse events was high. Because recurrent uveitis appears to be a risk factor for glaucoma in horses, topical administration of latanoprost may potentiate prostaglandin-mediated inflammatory disease in affected horses. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1945–1951)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of topical antimicrobial and antimicrobial-corticosteroid preparations on the ocular flora of horses.

Animals—40 horses.

Procedure—One eye was treated 3 times daily for 2 weeks with one of the following ointments: 1) neomycinbacitracin- polymyxin B, 2) 0.6% prednisolone-0.3% gentamicin, 3) neomycin-polymyxin B-0.05% dexamethasone, or 4) treated (artificial tears) control. Contralateral eyes of treated control eyes served as untreated control eyes. Corneal and conjunctival specimens for bacterial and fungal cultures were collected prior to initiation of treatment, after 1 and 2 weeks of treatment, and 2 weeks after concluding treatment. Changes in culture growth quantity scores of bacterial and fungal species were analyzed.

Results—The most common species before treatment were the following: gram-positive bacteria included Streptomyces spp (66%) , Staphylococcus spp (46%) , Bacillus spp (32%) , and Streptococcus spp (32%); gramnegative bacteria included Moraxella spp (28%) , Escherichia coli (24%) , Acinetobacter spp (18%), and Enterobacter spp (14%); and fungi included Aspergillus nidulans (56%) , Cladosporium spp (32%), and Aspergillus fumigatus (22%). In all groups, the percentage of positive bacterial culture results, growth quantity score of gram-positive bacteria, and number of bacterial species isolated decreased at week 1 and increased at week 2, whereas growth quantity score of gram-negative bacteria decreased throughout treatment. Differences were not significant among groups. Fungal growth quantity score decreased during treatment in all groups. Repopulation of bacterial and fungal species occurred.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—All interventions decreased the number of microorganisms. Repopulation of normal flora occurred during and after treatment. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:800–811)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of topical administration of 2% dorzolamide hydrochloride or 2% dorzolamide hydrochloride-0.5% timolol maleate on intraocular pressure (IOP) in clinically normal horses.

Animals—18 healthy adult horses without ocular abnormalities.

Procedure—The IOP was measured at 5 time points (7 AM, 9 AM, 11 AM, 3 PM, 7 PM) over 11 days. On days 1 and 2, baseline values were established. On days 3 through 5, horses received 2% dorzolamide HCl (group D, n = 9) or 2% dorzolamide HCl-0.5% timolol maleate (group DT, 9) in 1 randomly assigned eye every 24 hours immediately following each daily 7 AM IOP measurement. On days 6 through 9, each drug was given every 12 hours (7 AM and 7 PM) in the treated eye. Measurements on days 10 and 11 assessed return to baseline. Mixed linear regression models compared mean IOP difference for each drug at each time period.

Results—Mean IOP decreased significantly in all eyes during the 2 dose/d period, compared with the baseline, 1 dose/d, and follow-up periods.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of either drug every 24 hours for short-term treatment does not reduce IOP significantly. Administering either drug every 12 hours induced a significant reduction of IOP; however, controlling for all variables, the reduction was less than 2 mm Hg. (Am J Vet Res 2001;61:709–713)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the anesthetic, cardiorespiratory, and metabolic effects of 4 IV anesthetic regimens in Thoroughbred horses recuperating from a brief period of maximal exercise.

Animals—6 adult Thoroughbreds.

Procedure—Horses were preconditioned by exercising them on a treadmill. Each horse ran 4 simulated races, with a minimum of 14 days between races. Races were run at a treadmill speed that caused horses to exercise at 120% of their maximal oxygen consumption. Horses ran until fatigued or for a maximum of 2 minutes. Two minutes after exercise, horses received a combination of xylazine hydrochloride (2.2 mg/kg of body weight) and acepromazine maleate (0.04 mg/kg) IV. Five minutes after exercise, horses received 1 of the following 4 IV anesthetic regimens: ketamine hydrochloride (2.2 mg/kg); ketamine (2.2 mg/kg) and diazepam (0.1 mg/kg); tiletamine hydrochloride-zolazepam hydrochloride (1 mg/kg); and guaifenesin (50 mg/kg) and thiopental sodium (5 mg/kg). Treatments were randomized. Cardiopulmonary indices were measured, and samples of blood were collected before and at specific times for 90 minutes after each race.

Results—Each regimen induced lateral recumbency. The quality of induction and anesthesia after ketamine administration was significantly worse than after other regimens, and the duration of anesthesia was significantly shorter. Time to lateral recumbency was significantly longer after ketamine or guaifenesinthiopental administration than after ketaminediazepam or tiletamine-zolazepam administration. Arterial blood pressures after guaifenesin-thiopental administration were significantly lower than after the other regimens.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Anesthesia can be safely induced in sedated horses immediately after maximal exercise. Ketamine-diazepam and tiletamine- zolazepam induced good quality anesthesia with acceptable perturbations in cardiopulmonary and metabolic indices. Ketamine alone and guaifenesinthiopental regimens are not recommended. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1545–1552)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate intra-articular autologous protein solution (APS) for the treatment of osteoarthritis in horses.

Animals—40 client-owned horses with naturally occuring osteoarthritis.

Procedures—APS was generated from a dual-device system that concentrated plasma and WBC proteins and enriched platelet growth factors. Horses were randomly assigned to receive an intra-articular injection of 5 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (n = 20) or APS (20), exercised on a treadmill, and evaluated on the basis of lameness grades, kinetic gait analysis, joint circumference, and range of motion for 14 days. Horses that received saline solution were administered APS at termination of the study, and clients scored horses for lameness and discomfort before, 12 weeks after, and 52 weeks after the APS injection.

Results—The APS group had significant improvements in lameness grade, asymmetry indices of vertical peak force, and range of joint motion by 14 days, compared with baseline or control group values. No adverse effects associated with APS treatment were evident. Clients assessed lameness and comfort as improved at 12 and 52 weeks. The APS had greater likelihood (OR, 4.3 to 30.0) of a therapeutic response in horses with a lameness score < 4, < 10% vertical force asymmetry, or absence of marked osteophyte formation, subchondral sclerosis, or joint space narrowing. Concentration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in APS was 5.8 times that in blood.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intra-articular administration of APS can be considered an effective treatment option for equine osteoarthritis, with the potential for disease-modifying effects.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research