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  • Author or Editor: Kristopher S. Sharpe x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the influence of treatment with ultralow-dose aspirin (ULDAsp) on platelet aggregation, P-selectin (CD62P) expression, and formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in clinically normal dogs.

Animals—18 clinically normal dogs.

Procedures—Studies were conducted before and 24 hours after ULDAsp administration (0.5 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h, for 2 days). Whole blood impedance aggregometry for the assessment of platelet function was performed with sodium citrate–anticoagulated blood and aggregation agonists (ADP at 20, 10, and 5 μmol/L; collagen at 10, 5, and 2 μg/mL). Onset, maximum response, and rate of platelet aggregation were recorded. Flow cytometric assays were configured to detect thrombin-induced CD62P expression and platelet-leukocyte aggregates in EDTA-anticoagulated whole blood. Externalized platelet CD62P and constitutive CD61 (GPIIIa) were labeled with antibodies conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), respectively. Red blood cell–lysed paraformaldehyde-fixed EDTA-anticoagulated whole blood was dual labeled with CD61-FITC and a panleukocyte antibody (CD18-PE) to characterize platelet-leukocyte aggregates.

Results—ULDAsp significantly delayed platelet aggregation onset with ADP at 20 μmol/L by 54% to 104%, attenuated maximum aggregation with various concentrations of ADP and collagen by ≥ 41%, and slowed aggregation rate with the highest ADP and collagen concentrations by ≥ 39%. Depending on the parameter tested, up to 30% of dogs failed to have an ULDAsp effect. Thrombin stimulation significantly increased CD62P expression in platelets and platelet-leukocyte aggregates, but ULDAsp did not alter basal or thrombin-stimulated CD62P expression.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—ULDAsp treatment of clinically normal dogs impaired platelet aggregation in most dogs, but did not influence CD62P platelet membrane expression. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1294–1304)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize findings in Shih Tzus with progressive superficial necrolytic dermatitis and degenerative vacuolar hepatopathy consistent with hepatocutaneous syndrome.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 31 Shih Tzus.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to obtain information on signalment, history, treatment, outcome, and results of clinicopathologic testing, abdominal ultrasonography, and histologic examination of skin and liver specimens. A pedigree analysis was performed.

RESULTS There were 16 males and 15 females. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 8 years (range, 5 to 14 years). Common clinical signs included lethargy, inappetence, weight loss, and lameness. Twenty-five dogs had cutaneous lesions consistent with hepatocutaneous syndrome; the remaining 6 initially only had hepatic abnormalities, but 3 of the 6 subsequently developed cutaneous lesions. Common clinicopathologic abnormalities included microcytosis (15/24 [63%] dogs) and high serum alkaline phosphatase activity (24/24 [100%] dogs). Hepatic ultrasonographic findings included a hyperechoic or heteroechoic appearance to the parenchyma with innumerable hypoechoic nodules. Histologic hepatic lesions consisted of degenerative vacuolar (glycogen and lipid) hepatopathy associated with minimally fibrotic to nonfibrotic, noninflammatory, proliferative nodules. Pedigree analysis confirmed a common ancestry in 12 of 18 dogs. Median survival time was 3 months (range, 1 to 36 months).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that HCS may have a heritable component in Shih Tzus, although the condition may also be identified in Shih Tzus without affected relatives. Clinical, clinicopathologic, ultrasonographic, and histologic abnormalities in affected Shih Tzus were similar to those previously reported for dogs of other breeds with HCS. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2016;248:802–813)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize aminoaciduria and plasma amino acid concentrations in dogs with hepatocutaneous syndrome (HCS).

ANIMALS 20 client-owned dogs of various breeds and ages.

PROCEDURES HCS was definitively diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsy specimens (n = 12), gross and histologic appearance of skin lesions (4), and examination of skin and liver biopsy specimens (2) and presumptively diagnosed on the basis of cutaneous lesions with compatible clinicopathologic and hepatic ultrasonographic (honeycomb or Swiss cheese pattern) findings (2). Amino acid concentrations in heparinized plasma and urine (samples obtained within 8 hours of each other) were measured by use of ion exchange chromatography. Urine creatinine concentration was used to normalize urine amino acid concentrations. Plasma amino acid values were compared relative to mean reference values; urine-corrected amino acid values were compared relative to maximal reference values.

RESULTS All dogs had generalized hypoaminoacidemia, with numerous amino acid concentrations < 50% of mean reference values. The most consistent and severe abnormalities involved glutamine, proline, cysteine, and hydroxyproline, and all dogs had marked lysinuria. Urine amino acids exceeding maximum reference values (value > 1.0) included lysine, 1-methylhistidine, and proline.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Hypoaminoacidemia in dogs with HCS prominently involved amino acids associated with the urea cycle and synthesis of glutathione and collagen. Marked lysinuria and prolinuria implicated dysfunction of specific amino acid transporters and wasting of amino acids essential for collagen synthesis. These findings may provide a means for tailoring nutritional support and for facilitating HCS diagnosis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research