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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the feasibility of radiographic measurement of liver area in small-breed dogs and to assess correlations between CT liver volume measurements (reference standard) and radiographic liver size measurements.

ANIMALS

107 small-breed dogs (body weight, ≤ 10 kg) that had previously undergone orthogonal thoracic and abdominal radiography and abdominal CT.

PROCEDURES

In a retrospective study design, dogs were allocated to groups (normal liver [n = 36], microhepatia [34], and hepatomegaly [37]) on the basis of radiographic liver size and clinicopathologic findings. Radiographic liver area (RLA) was automatically calculated from archived radiographic images by free-hand outlining of the liver margins by use of DICOM viewer software, and other standard radiographic measurements were performed. Liver volume was measured on CT images. Intraoperator repeatability of RLA and CT measurements was assessed (duplicate measurements 2 weeks apart). To control for various breed conformations, radiographic values were normalized to body weight and T11 area.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD ratios of RLA to T11 area and RLA to body weight for dogs with normal livers were 32.7 ± 6.2 and 7.0 ± 1.4, respectively. Excellent intraobserver agreement was observed in RLA measurements within groups (intraclass correlation coefficients, 0.861 to 0.989), and RLA measurements had the highest correlation with CT liver volume measurements (r = 0.94) of all radiographic measurements.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that RLA measurement in small-breed dogs with or without liver disease was useful and accurate for estimation of liver size, compared with CT measurement, and might be particularly useful for monitoring of changes in liver size.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine renal arterial resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) and clinical signs of overhydration induced by IV administration of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution and to assess RI and PI as variables for monitoring of dogs to detect overhydration.

Animals—10 clinically normal Beagles.

Procedures—Each dog received saline solution at a maintenance rate (2.5 mL/kg/h) and a rate 3 times that of the maintenance rate (overhydration rate; 7. 5 mL/kg/h). Values of RI and PI were determined with pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonographic examination of renal interlobar or arcuate arteries before saline solution administration, every hour during 5 hours of administration, and 1 hour after administration was stopped.

Results—No significant changes in RI or PI were detected during administration of saline solution at the maintenance rate. However, RI (starting 1 hour after the beginning of fluid administration [mean ± SD value, 0.589 ± 0.012]) and PI (starting 2 hours after the beginning of fluid administration [value, 0.867 ± 0.052]) were significantly lower during administration at the overhydration rate than they were during administration at the maintenance rate. Clinical signs of overhydration were observed in all dogs starting 4 hours after the beginning of fluid administration at the overhydration rate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated overhydration of dogs caused significant decreases in RI and PI prior to detection of clinical signs of overhydration. Ultrasonographic determination of renal arterial RI and PI seemed to be a noninvasive and sensitive method for evaluation of overhydration in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To fluoroscopically evaluate the effects of head posture and sedation on the laryngopharyngeal anatomic structures in dogs.

ANIMALS

6 clinically normal Beagles (mean age, 6.2 years; mean weight, 10.4 kg).

PROCEDURES

Each dog was sedated and placed in right lateral recumbency, and fluoroscopic examinations were performed with flexed, neutral, and extended head postures (FHP, NHP, and EHP, respectively). During 3 respiratory cycles, the angle between the basisphenoid bone and nasopharyngeal dorsal border (ABN), thickness of the soft palate, diameter of the nasopharyngeal lumen (DNL), overlapping length between the epiglottis and soft palate, and distance between the epiglottis and tympanic bulla (DET) were measured and percentage difference in the DNL (PDNLD) during a respiratory cycle was calculated.

RESULTS

For the FHP, NHP, and EHP, median ABN was 91.50° (interquartile range [IQR], 86.75° to 95.00°), 125.00° (IQR, 124.50° to 125.50°), and 160.00° (IQR, 160.00° to 163.50°), respectively, with no significant differences between ABN and posture angle. For the FHP, median DNL and DET significantly decreased, compared with values for the NHP, and median thickness of the soft palette significantly increased. For the EHP, the minimal DNL and DET significantly increased, and the median overlapping length between the epiglottis and soft palate significantly decreased, compared with values for the NHP. The PDNLD significantly increased and decreased with FHP and EHP, respectively, compared with the PDNLD with NHP. Sedation did not affect upper airway structure changes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that head posture significantly affected the laryngopharyngeal structures in dogs. Fluoroscopic examination of the upper respiratory tract of a dog should be performed with an NHP to minimize posture-induced changes in measurements.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular (LV) volume obtained via a modified Simpson or Teichholz method with those obtained via dual-source CT (DSCT).

Animals—7 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Each dog was anesthetized for DSCT; LV volume was determined from contrast-enhanced images of the LV lumen during all phases of contraction. Echocardiography was performed with dogs awake and anesthetized. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume, and ejection fraction were measured via a modified Simpson method and Teichholz method. Each dog was anesthetized twice with a 1-week interval between anesthetic sessions.

Results—Results obtained while dogs were anesthetized revealed that the modified Simpson method underestimated LV volume (mean ± SD EDV, 24.82 ± 2.38 mL; ESV, 12.24 ± 1.77 mL), compared with that estimated by the Teichholz method (EDV, 32.57 ± 2.85 mL; ESV, 14.87 ± 2.09 mL) or DSCT (EDV, 34.14 ± 1.57 mL; ESV, 16.71 ± 0.76 mL). Ejection fraction (modified Simpson method, 48.53% ± 4.24%; Teichholz method, 54.33% ± 4.26%; DSCT, 51.00% ± 2.71%) differed significantly among the 3 methods. Echocardiographic results obtained while dogs were awake revealed that EDV, ESV, and stroke volume differed significantly between the modified Simpson and Teichholz methods.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—LV volume determined via the Teichholz method was more similar to that determined via DSCT than was the LV volume determined via the modified Simpson method. The modified Simpson method underestimated LV volume, compared with that obtained via the Teichholz method, in both anesthetized and awake dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of color Doppler imaging (CDI) for determining the resistive index (RI) of the medial long posterior ciliary artery (mLPCA) in clinically normal conscious dogs.

Animals—18 (10 sexually intact males, 8 sexually intact females) dogs between 1 and 5 years old.

Procedure—Color Doppler ultrasonography was performed on both eyes with dogs in a sitting position. Each eye was imaged from the region dorsal to the zygomatic arch with the transducer positioned in a horizontal plane. The mLPCA was localized, and RI was calculated from velocities obtained for 3 similar Doppler waveforms. To determine the reproducibility of CDI-derived RI, measurements were repeated twice at a 10-day interval.

Results—Mean (± SD) RI of the mLPCA was 0.68 ± 0.07 (95% confidence interval, 0.65 to 0.70; n = 36 eyes). Resistive index did not significantly differ between right and left eyes or male and female dogs. In addition, body weight was not correlated with RI. Repeated measurements of RI did not yield significantly different results (interclass correlation coefficient, 0.8297).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Color Doppler imaging appears to be a valid technique for determination of RI of the mLPCA in conscious dogs. This technique may be useful for investigating the pathophysiologic processes of many ocular and orbital vascular disorders in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:211–214)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare shear-wave velocities (SWVs) with shear-wave elastography of various peripheral lymph nodes (LNs).

ANIMALS

11 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

For each dog, bilateral mandibular, medial retropharyngeal, superficial cervical, axillary, superficial inguinal, and popliteal LNs were evaluated with shear-wave elastography in sagittal and transverse scanning planes. Depth of each lymph node was recorded, and intra- and interobserver reliability was determined.

RESULTS

SWVs for all LNs were significantly higher in the sagittal scanning plane, compared with those in the transverse scanning plane. The SWV of the most superficial LN, the mandibular LN, was significantly higher, compared with that for the other LNs, except for the medial retropharyngeal LN. The SWV of the deepest LN, the medial retropharyngeal LN, was as high as that for the mandibular LN. Intra- and interobserver reliability was excellent.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

SWVs for normal peripheral LNs of Beagles may serve as a reference to compare with those for other breeds and diseased LNs. Scanning plane, LN depth, and interfering tissues between the LN and the transducer may affect SWV. Shear-wave elastography may not be operator dependent.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research