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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether maternally derived antibodies interfere with the mucosal immune response following intranasal (IN) vaccination of newborn calves with a multivalent modified-live virus vaccine.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—23 newborn Holstein bull calves.

Procedures—Calves received colostrum and were assigned to group A (unvaccinated control calves), group B (IN vaccination on day 0), or group C (IN vaccination on days 0 and 35). Serum and nasal secretion sample (NSS) titers of antibodies specific for bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, and bovine viral diarrhea virus 2; WBC counts; and NSS interferon concentrations were determined up to day 77.

Results—Calves had high serum titers of maternally derived antibodies specific for vaccine virus antigens on day 0. High IgA and low IgG titers were detected in NSSs on day 0; NSS titers of IgA decreased by day 5. Group B and C NSS IgA titers were significantly higher than those of group A on days 10 through 35; group C IgA titers increased after the second vaccination. Serum antibody titers decreased at a similar rate among groups of calves. Interferons were not detected in NSSs, and calves did not develop leukopenia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—IN vaccination of newborn calves with high concentrations of virus-neutralizing antibodies increased NSS IgA titers but did not change serum antibody titers. Revaccination of group C calves on day 35 induced IgA production. Intranasal vaccination with a modified-live virus vaccine was effective in calves that had maternally derived antibodies.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare immune responses induced by 2 commercially available vaccines with a bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV1) component following intranasal (IN) administration to colostrum-fed calves.

ANIMALS

90 male Holstein calves (ages, 5 to 14 days).

PROCEDURES

In a randomized complete block design, each calf received 2 mL (1 mL/nostril) of vaccine A (n = 30), vaccine B (30), or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (30) on day 0. Blood samples were collected for determination of serum anti-BHV1 IgG titer, and nasal fluid (NF) samples were collected for determination of interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-γ concentrations and for secretory IgA titers against BHV1, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Pasteurella multocida at predetermined times for 42 days after vaccination.

RESULTS

All calves were seropositive for anti-BHV1 IgG, and the mean anti-BHV1 IgG titer did not differ significantly among the 3 groups at any time. Both vaccines induced significant transient increases in NF IFN-α and IFN-γ concentrations. On day 5, mean IFN-α concentration and the proportion of calves with detectable IFN-α concentrations for the vaccine A group were significantly greater than those for the vaccine B and control groups. On day 42, the mean NF anti–P multocida IgA titers for both vaccine groups were significantly greater than that of the control group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Both vaccines induced innate and acquired immune responses in calves with colostral antibodies. The magnitude of the IFN-α response and proportion of calves with detectable IFN-α differed between the 2 vaccine groups. Both vaccines appeared to enhance the IgA response against P multocida.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize biomechanical differences in gait between dogs with and without an amputated thoracic limb.

Animals—Client-owned dogs (16 thoracic-limb amputee and 24 quadruped [control] dogs).

Procedures—Dogs were trotted across 3 in-series force platforms. Spatial kinematic and kinetic data were recorded for each limb during the stance phase.

Results—Amputees had significant increases in stance duration and vertical impulse in all limbs, compared with values for control dogs. Weight distribution was significantly increased by 14% on the remaining thoracic limb and by a combined 17% on pelvic limbs in amputees. Braking ground reaction force (GRF) was significantly increased in the remaining thoracic limb and pelvic limb ipsilateral to the amputated limb. The ipsilateral pelvic limb had a significantly increased propulsive GRF. The carpus and ipsilateral hip and stifle joints had significantly greater flexion during the stance phase. The cervicothoracic vertebral region had a significantly increased overall range of motion (ROM) in both the sagittal and horizontal planes. The thoracolumbar vertebral region ROM increased significantly in the sagittal plane but decreased in the horizontal plane. The lumbosacral vertebral region had significantly greater flexion without a change in ROM.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Compared with results for quadruped dogs, the vertebral column, carpus, and ipsilateral hip and stifle joints had significant biomechanical changes after amputation of a thoracic limb. The ipsilateral pelvic limb assumed dual thoracic and pelvic limb roles because the gait of a thoracic limb amputee during trotting appeared to be a mixture of various gait patterns.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate biomechanical gait adaptations in dogs after amputation of a pelvic limb.

Animals—Client-owned dogs (12 pelvic limb–amputee and 24 quadruped [control] dogs).

Procedures—Dogs were trotted across 3 in-series force platforms. Spatial kinematic and kinetic data were recorded for each limb during the stance phase.

Results—Pelvic limb amputees had increased peak braking forces in the contralateral thoracic limb and increased propulsive forces and impulses in both the ipsilateral thoracic limb and remaining pelvic limb. Time to peak braking force was significantly decreased, and time to peak propulsive force was significantly increased in all remaining limbs in amputees. Amputees had an increase in range of motion at the tarsal joint of the remaining pelvic limb, compared with results for the control dogs. Amputees had increased vertebral range of motion at T1 and T13 and increased vertebral extension at L7 within the sagittal plane. In the horizontal plane, amputees had increased lateral bending toward the remaining pelvic limb, which resulted in a laterally deviated gait pattern.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pelvic limb amputees adjusted to loss of a limb through increased range of motion at the tarsal joint, increased range of motion in the cervicothoracic and thoracolumbar vertebral regions, and extension of the lumbosacral vertebral region, compared with results for the control dogs. Amputees alternated between a laterally deviated gait when the pelvic limb was in propulsion and a regular cranially oriented gait pattern when either forelimb was in propulsion with horizontal rotation around L7.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research