Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Kenneth E. Sullins x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether excision was an acceptable treatment for dermal melanomatosis in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—11 horses with dermal melanomatosis involving the perineal, perianal, or perirectal region or ventral surface of the tail in which treatment consisted of tumor excision.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed. Followup information was obtained from owners through telephone interviews.

Results—9 of the 11 horses were alive at the time of follow-up interviews. None of the horses had regrowth at the surgery site where the primary tumor was removed. There were no confirmed clinical signs of internal metastasis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that excision of dermal melanomatosis in horses may be a reasonable treatment option. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:94–96)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome for equids with cutaneous neoplasms treated with cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads, alone or in conjunction with debulking.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—56 horses, 1 zebra, 1 donkey, and 1 mule.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone conversations with owners and trainers of the animals.

Results—22 tumors were sarcoids, 6 were fibrosarcomas, 1 was a fibroma, 2 were peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 11 were squamous cell carcinomas, 14 were melanomas (13 gray horses and 1 bay horse), 1 was a lymphosarcoma, 1 was an adenocarcinoma, and 1 was a basal cell tumor. Forty-five (76%) animals underwent conventional or laser debulking of the tumor prior to bead implantation. Forty of 48 (83%) animals for which long-term follow-up information was available were relapse free 2 years after treatment. This included 20 of 22 animals with spindle cell tumors (including 11/13 horses with sarcoids), 6 of 10 animals with squamous cell carcinomas, 13 of 14 animals with melanomas, and 2 of 3 animals with other tumor types. Adverse effects were minimal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that implantation of cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads, with or without tumor debulking, may be an effective treatment for equidae with various cutaneous neoplasms.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of arthroscopy as the primary method for removal of large patellar fracture fragments.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—5 performance horses of various breeds with patellar fractures.

Procedure—Clinical signs of lameness, external evidence of injury, and radiography were used to diagnose and determine fracture orientation. Arthroscopy of the stifle joint was performed on the affected limb with the horse positioned in dorsal recumbency and under general anesthesia. Progress after surgery was determined by evaluating medical records and via telephone conversations with owners.

Results—4 of 5 horses had fractures of the medial aspect of the patella and 1 horse had a fracture of the lateral aspect of the patella. There were no postoperative complications with the joint or the arthroscopic portal incisions. Recovery periods ranged from 3 to 5 months. All horses recovered completely from surgery, and performed at the same or higher level of competition as before arthroscopy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Femoropatellar joint arthroscopy is a favorable means by which evaluation of the stifle joint and removal of large fracture fragments can be achieved with negligible postoperative complications. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1799–1801)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine long-term effects of transendoscopic, laser-assisted ventriculocordectomy (LAVC) on airway noise and performance in horses with naturally occurring left laryngeal hemiplegia.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—22 horses with left laryngeal hemiplegia treated by means of LAVC.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed and initial complaint, intended use of the horse, duration of abnormal airway noise, preoperative performance level, endoscopic findings, surgical procedure, postoperative treatment, and complications were recorded. Follow-up telephone interviews with owners and trainers were conducted to determine time for return to intended use, level of postoperative performance, and percentage reduction in airway noise.

Results—All horses were examined because of excessive airway noise; 10 (45%) had concurrent exercise intolerance. Left ventriculocordectomy was performed in all 22 horses; bilateral ventriculocordectomy (right ventriculocordectomy was done 1 year later) was performed in 1 horse (5%). Complications occurred in 3 (14%) horses. Twenty (91%) horses returned to their intended use. Excessive airway noise was eliminated after surgery in 18 (82%) horses; exercise intolerance improved postoperatively in 8 of 10 horses. Three racing Thoroughbreds returned to racing; 1 additional racehorse returned to racing but required a laryngoplasty 1 year later to continue racing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that LAVC was an effective procedure for elimination of excessive airway noise and improvement of performance in horses with left laryngeal hemiplegia.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether povidone iodine ointment or 2 forms of silver sulfadiazine applied topically to wounds of the distal aspect of the limbs in horses affect the rate of second intention healing and to evaluate the additional influence of bandaging with these antimicrobials on granulation tissue formation.

Animals—6 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—Six standardized 2.5-cm2 skin wounds/horse were distributed between the dorsomedial surfaces of the metacarpi and metatarsi. One of the following 6 treatments was applied to each wound: 1% silver sulfadiazine cream with bandage, 1% silver sulfadiazine slow-release matrix with bandage, 1% silver sulfadiazine slow-release matrix without bandage, povidone-iodine ointment with bandage, untreated control with bandage, and untreated control without bandage. Wound area, granulation tissue area, and perimeter were measured by use of planimetry software applied to digital images. Exuberant granulation tissue was excised when present. Days until healing, rate of healing parameter, rate of contraction, and epithelialization were compared among wound treatment groups.

Results—Healing parameters and mean days to healing did not differ significantly among any of the wound treatment groups. Percentage wound contraction and rate of epithelialization were similar among wound treatments. All bandaged wounds produced exuberant granulation tissue, which was surgically excised; none of the unbandaged wounds produced exuberant granulation tissue.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—When exuberant granulation tissue is removed, rates of epithelialization and wound contraction were not different among wound treatment groups, whether bandaged or unbandaged. Topical application of 1% silver sulfadiazine slow-release matrix on unbandaged wounds induced the same result as medications applied beneath bandages, but without exuberant granulation tissue formation. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:88–92)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research