Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Kendon Kuo x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify the preferences of small animal veterinary clients for the timing of communication during CPR and whether these clients prefer the veterinarian or pet owner to decide on the termination of resuscitation.

SAMPLE

Surveys (n = 1,648) were completed between January 20 and February 3, 2023, by clients of the Wilford and Kate Bailey Small Animal Teaching Hospital.

METHODS

This cross-sectional observational study used an anonymous internet-based survey distributed to 28,000 clients of an academic small animal veterinary hospital. The survey included 16 questions asking for the respondents’ demographics, healthcare professional status, questions pertaining to CPR, and preference for timing of communication during CPR, veterinary team members to speak to, and the decision on termination of resuscitation. An optional open comment section was provided.

RESULTS

The response rate was 7.5%, including 2,127 responses, with 1,648 complete responses used for further analysis. Of the respondents, 56% and 63% (when asked using a short and long scenario question, respectively) would prefer to be informed about their pet undergoing CPR after CPR has ended. Most clients (84%) wanted the veterinarian to decide when to stop CPR. In the comments section, clients predominantly emphasized that patient care should always be prioritized over client communication.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This study contributes to a better understanding of veterinary clients’ preferences and may help improve client communication and decision-making during CPR. More studies are warranted to reach a wider population before broad recommendations can be made.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess intraobserver and interobserver reliability of capillary refill time (CRT) measurement in dogs using a standardized technique after training.

ANIMALS

20 dogs presented to the emergency room.

METHODS

Dogs presented to the emergency room were prospectively recruited. Using a timing device and standardized technique, CRT was measured at the oral mucosa of the inner lip. Measurements were performed by 2 emergency and critical care residents (observer 1 [Ob1] and observer 2 [Ob2]) and repeated 3 times by each observer for each dog. CRT values and signalment were recorded. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were analyzed by calculation of the coefficient of variation (CV%), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and minimal detectable difference. Reliability was considered high if CV% was lower than 10% and ICC was between 0.9 and 1.

RESULTS

Median CRT for Ob1 was 1.22 seconds and for Ob2 was 1.19 seconds. Intraobserver reliability was high, evidenced by a median CV% of 6.2% (range, 1.0% to 18.6%) and 9.5% (range, 1.3% to 22.6%) and an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI, 0.94 to 0.99) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90 to 0.98) for Ob1 and Ob2, respectively. Between observers, the CV% was 4.4% (range, 0.8% to 17.5%) and the ICC was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.94 to 0.99), indicating high interobserver reliability. The minimal detectable differences for intraobserver and interobserver were 0.30 and 0.34 seconds, respectively.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The reported high reliability of CRT despite its subjective nature enhances its usefulness in daily practice. However, further research on the validity of CRT is warranted.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association