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History

An 8-year-old 5.9-kg spayed female Dachshund was presented for sudden-onset vomiting, severe hemorrhagic diarrhea, and lethargy. The dog had been at a boarding facility where earlier that morning the dog was found collapsed in its kennel along with a large amount of blood on the kennel floor. The previous night, the dog showed signs of little appetite and vomited a small amount.

On physical examination, the dog was laterally recumbent and minimally responsive, had a heart rate of 200 beats/min (reference range, 80 to 130 beats/min), tacky mucous membranes, and nondetectable indirect blood pressure (attempted measurements with oscillometry). The

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 10-year-old 4.36-kg (9.59-lb) spayed female domestic longhair cat was evaluated because of pelvic limb paresis of 7 weeks' duration. The cat was kept indoors with outdoor access, and had previously been apparently healthy. The owners first found the cat nonambulatory in their yard 2 hours after being let outside and immediately took it to the referring veterinarian. Radiographic findings suggested a possible pelvic fracture, but the cat had adequate urinary continence. Cage rest was recommended. After minimal improvement over time, a referral examination was arranged. The physical examination was limited owing to the cat's temperament. The cat would bear

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 5.0-kg (11.0-lb) 3-year-old sexually intact male Shih Tzu was referred for investigation of an enlarged heart that had been observed on routine thoracic radiographs by the referring veterinarian. When the patient was a puppy, medical records from the referring veterinarian indicated that a loud left-sided heart murmur was auscultated (murmur timing was not documented). This heart murmur decreased in intensity and was no longer present by 6 months of age. The patient had a recent history of gastrointestinal upset, but had been otherwise apparently healthy.

On physical examination, the patient was bright, alert, and responsive, with a heart

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association