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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of triclosan-coated (TC) suture in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) in dogs and cats undergoing surgical procedures.

ANIMALS

862 animals (794 dogs and 68 cats).

PROCEDURES

Incidences of SSI of surgical wounds closed with TC suture and surgical wounds closed with non-TC suture occurring between the time of surgery and 1 month postoperatively were compared. Animals were randomly assigned to TC or non-TC suture groups. When TC suture was assigned, all suture available as TC material was used rather than non-TC suture. Presence of an SSI was determined by an owner questionnaire or direct examination.

RESULTS

Overall, 50 of 862 (5.8%) animals developed SSIs. Incidence of SSI was 6% (24/428) in the non-TC suture group and 6% (26/434) in the TC suture group. No significant difference was found in the incidence of SSI between groups. No significant difference was detected in the incidence of incisional problems (eg, redness, dehiscence, and seroma formation) between animals in which TC suture was used and those in which non-TC suture was used. On multivariable analysis, other factors were associated with increased SSI rates, including an incision length > 10 cm, surgery performed by the soft tissue surgery department, and anesthesia duration of > 240 minutes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

No significant difference in incidence of SSI was detected between animals undergoing surgical procedures performed with non-TC versus TC suture.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the likelihood and outcome of esophageal perforation secondary to an esophageal foreign body (EFB) in dogs.

DESIGN Retrospective observational study.

ANIMALS 125 dogs evaluated for EFB at 2 veterinary teaching hospitals from January 2005 through December 2013.

PROCEDURES Data were retrieved from the medical record of each dog regarding variables hypothesized to be associated with esophageal perforation, whether esophageal perforation was present, and survival to hospital discharge. Variables were examined for associations with various outcomes.

RESULTS Bones (55/125 [44%]) and fishhooks (37/125 [30%]) were the most common types of EFBs. Fifteen (12%) dogs had an esophageal perforation (10 with a fishhook EFB and 5 with a bone EFB). No association was identified between dog body weight and esophageal perforation. Esophageal perforation was more likely in dogs with a fishhook EFB (10/37 [27%]) versus other EFBs (5/88 [6%]; OR, 6.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 9.6). Median interval from fishhook or bone ingestion to initial evaluation was significantly longer for dogs with (12 and 96 hours, respectively) versus without (1 and 24 hours, respectively) perforation. Thirteen of 15 (87%) dogs with esophageal perforation survived to hospital discharge, including all 10 dogs with perforation secondary to fishhook ingestion. Eight survivors with esophageal perforation required no surgical intervention.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Esophageal perforation was uncommon in the evaluated dogs with an EFB, and no surgical intervention was required for a large proportion of them. Fishhooks and delay between EFB ingestion and initial evaluation were risk factors for perforation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION 5 dogs (median age, 9 years; median body weight, 31 kg [68.2 lb]) with undefined nasal masses were examined after undergoing CT of the head and nasal biopsy via a rostral rhinoscopic or unaided (blind) approach because histologic results for collected biopsy specimens (inflammatory, necrotic, or hemorrhagic disease) suggested the specimens were nonrepresentative of the underlying disease process identified via CT (aggressive or malignant disease).

CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical signs at the time dogs were evaluated included open-mouth breathing, sneezing, or unilateral epistaxis. Histologic findings pertaining to the original biopsy specimens were suggestive of benign processes such as inflammation. In an attempt to obtain better representative specimens, a frameless CT-guided stereotactic biopsy system (CTSBS) was used to collect additional biopsy specimens from masses within the nasal and sinus passages of the dogs. The second set of biopsy specimens was histologically evaluated.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Histologic evaluation of biopsy specimens collected via the CTSBS revealed results suggestive of malignant neoplasia (specifically, chondrosarcoma, hemangiopericytoma, or undifferentiated sarcoma) for 3 dogs, mild mixed-cell inflammation for 1 dog, and hamartoma for 1 dog. No complications were reported. These findings resulted in a change in treatment recommendations for 3 dogs and confirmed that no additional treatment was required for 1 dog (with hamartoma). For the remaining dog, in which CT findings and clinical history were strongly suggestive of neoplasia, the final diagnosis was rhinitis.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Biopsy specimens were safely collected from masses within the nasal and sinus passages of dogs by use of a frameless CTSBS, allowing a definitive diagnosis that was unachievable with other biopsy approaches.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old spayed female Boxer was evaluated for a cutaneous mass located on the dorsum. The mass had been present for 6 weeks and was increasing in size.

Clinical Findings—A mass of approximately 10 cm in diameter was detected on the dorsum cranial to the right ilial wing. Histologic examination of a tissue sample from the mass led to the diagnosis of cutaneous pythiosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen and the mass were performed and revealed a contrast-enhancing soft tissue mass of the dorsum and enlarged intra-abdominal lymph nodes.

Treatment and Outcome—The dog underwent surgical excision of the cutaneous mass, including 5-cm skin margins and deep margins of 2 fascial planes. The mass was completely excised on the basis of results of histologic examination of surgical margins. The dog received itraconazole and terbinafine by mouth for 3 months following surgery. Recheck examination at 20 months postoperatively showed no signs of recurrence of pythiosis at the surgical site.

Clinical Relevance—Aggressive surgical excision in combination with medical treatment resulted in a favorable long-term (> 1 year) outcome in this dog. Thorough workup including diagnostic imaging and lymph node evaluation is recommended. If surgery is to be performed, skin margins of 5 cm and deep margins of 2 fascial planes are recommended.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the intestinal incisional dehiscence rate following enterotomy for foreign body removal in dogs.

ANIMALS

247 client-owned dogs with intestinal foreign bodies treated with enterotomy between November 2001 and September 2017.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed, and data were collected regarding signalment, history, surgery, clinicopathologic findings, hospitalization, intestinal incisional dehiscence, and survival to hospital discharge. Dogs were grouped according to whether intestinal incisional dehiscence occurred (dehiscence group) or did not occur (nondehiscence group) following enterotomy, and the rate of dehiscence for the total number of enterotomies during the study period was calculated. Univariable analysis was performed to identify variables associated with intestinal incisional dehiscence.

RESULTS

8 of the 247 (3.2%) dogs had preoperative septic peritonitis, and all 8 dogs survived to hospital discharge. Incisional dehiscence occurred following 5 of the 247 (2.0%) enterotomies, and only 2 dogs in the dehiscence group did not survive to hospital discharge. Duration of hospitalization was longer for dogs in the dehiscence group than for dogs in the nondehiscence group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that enterotomy for intestinal foreign body removal had a lower rate of dehiscence in dogs during the study period, compared with rates previously reported; however, the low rate should not be used as a reason to perform an enterotomy rather than an enterectomy when needed. Surgeons should thoroughly evaluate the bowel and perform an enterotomy only when indicated.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare bacteriologic culture results for superficial swab and tissue biopsy specimens obtained from dogs with open skin wounds.

ANIMALS

52 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

For each dog, 1 wound underwent routine preparation prior to collection of 2 specimens, 1 by superficial swab (Levine) technique and 1 by tissue biopsy. Specimens were processed for bacteriologic culture. Two observers determined whether any detected difference in culture results for the 2 types of specimen would have resulted in differing treatment plans.

RESULTS

Culture results of swab and tissue biopsy specimens were identical in 11/52 (21.2%) cases. Tissue biopsy specimen and swab cultures yielded positive results for 44 (84.6%) and 40 (76.9%) wounds, respectively. With regard to mean recovery rates of bacteria from wounds with positive culture results, both the biopsy specimens and swabs yielded 3.4 bacterial species/wound. All wounds for which swab cultures yielded no growth also had negative culture results for biopsy specimens. Biopsy specimen and swab culture results were in agreement with regard to the most common bacteria cultured. In 7/52 (13%) wounds, the observers would have treated the patient differently on the basis of the results of the 2 cultures.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that culture of a swab collected by the Levine technique is an appropriate noninvasive alternative to culture of a tissue biopsy specimen. A negative result obtained from culture of a swab is likely to be reliable. Disagreement between the results of swab and tissue biopsy specimen cultures is likely of low clinical importance.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare short-term complication rates in dogs and cats undergoing cystotomy closure by use of an inverting double-layer pattern (group I) versus cystotomy closure by use of an appositional single-layer pattern (group A).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—144 client-owned dogs and cats that underwent cystotomy between 1993 and 2010.

Procedures—Information on signalment, reason for cystotomy, method of cystotomy closure, complications that developed during hospitalization, and duration of hospitalization were obtained from the medical record. The effect of closure technique on short-term complication rate and duration of hospitalization was examined.

Results—2 of the 144 animals developed dehiscence and uroabdomen following cystotomy closure: 1 from group A and 1 from group I. Of group A animals, 29 of 79 (37%) developed minor complications such as hematuria and dysuria. Of group I animals, 33 of 65 (50%) developed the same complications. Group A and group I animals did not differ significantly with regard to prevalence of minor or major complications. The mean duration of hospitalization was 4.1 days and did not differ significantly between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An appositional single-layer suture pattern for cystotomy closure was a safe and effective procedure with minimal risk of urine leakage and a short-term complication rate of 37%. The appositional single-layer suture pattern for cystotomy closure may be recommended for clinical use because the inverting double-layer suture pattern offered no clear advantage.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of open toggle rod stabilization in dogs with luxation of the hip joint.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—62 dogs.

Procedures—Information on signalment, surgical procedure, and postoperative care was obtained from the medical records. A questionnaire was sent to all owners to solicit follow-up information.

Results—The distribution for time between luxation and surgery was bimodal, with 24 (39%) dogs examined ≤ 2 days after injury and 23 (37%) examined > 7 days after injury. Postoperative complications developed in 16 of the 62 (26%) dogs, with complications developing within 1 week after surgery in 10 of the 16. The most common complication was reluxation, which occurred in 7 dogs. Dogs in which surgery time was < 2 hours were significantly less likely to have a reluxation (2/40 [5%]) than were dogs in which surgery time was ≥ 2 hours (5/22 [23%]). When asked to rate current limb function (0 = no lameness and 5 = non–weightbearing lame) a minimum of 6 months after surgery, 23 of 27 (85%) owners indicated a score of 0 or 1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of the present study suggest that toggle rod stabilization is an effective treatment for hip joint luxation in dogs. However, complications, particularly reluxation, were common.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate postmortem surgery site leakage by use of in situ isolated pulsatile perfusion after partial liver lobectomies.

Animals—10 healthy mixed-breed male dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized, and 5 surgical techniques (pretied suture loop, energy-based sealer-divider, harmonic scalpel, suction with clip application, or suction with use of a thoracoabdominal stapler) were used to perform 5 partial liver lobectomies in each dog. Dogs were euthanatized, and the portal vein and hepatic artery were cannulated and perfused with a modified kidney perfusion machine (pulsatile flow for arterial perfusion and nonpulsatile flow for portal perfusion). Lobectomy sites were inspected for leakage of perfusate, and time until detection of leakage was recorded. The techniques in each dog were ranked on the basis of time until leakage. Time until leakage and rankings for each surgical technique were analyzed by use of an ANOVA.

Results—Leakage of perfusate was recorded in 44 lobes at supraphysiologic pressures. Of the 6 lobes without leakage, a pretied suture loop procedure was performed in 5 and a harmonic scalpel procedure was performed in 1. Time until leakage and the ranking differed significantly between the pretied suture loop and the other techniques. Time until leakage and ranking did not differ significantly among the other techniques.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Time until leakage of perfusate was greater for the pretied suture loop technique than for the other techniques, and that technique did not fail in 5 of 10 lobes. However, all techniques appeared to be safe for clinical use.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
History

A 4-month-old female American Saddlebred was referred for increased respiratory effort, lethargy, inappetance, weight loss, and insufficient growth of 4 weeks' duration. Neither coughing nor nasal discharge had been observed. Clinical signs had become worse despite treatment with ceftiofur sodium.

On admission, the foal was moderately thin, lethargic, 5% to 6% dehydrated, tachypneic (respiratory rate, 49 breaths/min; reference range, 10 to 30 breaths/min), tachycardic (156 beats/min; reference range, 30 to 45 beats/min), and febrile (40.2°C [104.3°F]; reference range, 37.5° to 39.0°C [99° to 102°F]) and had pale mucous membranes, and its respiratory effort was increased. Normal breath sounds were

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association