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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate use of serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin concentrations as prognostic indicators for horses with inflammatory disease in regard to euthanasia, complications, and hospitalization duration and cost.

ANIMALS 20 clinically normal horses and 53 horses with inflammatory disease.

PROCEDURES Total WBC count, neutrophil count, and fibrinogen, SAA, and haptoglobin concentrations were determined for clinically normal horses and horses with suspected inflammatory disease. Clinicopathologic values at admission were compared to test the use of SAA and haptoglobin concentrations in predicting euthanasia, complications, and hospitalization duration and cost. Haptoglobin and SAA concentrations of 22 horses were monitored during hospitalization to test the use of serial measurements in predicting survival and complications.

RESULTS Neutrophil count and SAA and haptoglobin concentrations were significantly different at admission for horses with inflammatory disease, compared with those for clinically normal horses. Horses with colitis and peritonitis had significantly higher SAA and haptoglobin concentrations than clinically normal horses. A moderate positive correlation (r = 0.355) between hospitalization duration and haptoglobin concentration was identified. Horses with an increase in SAA concentration between 24 and 72 hours after admission, compared with admission SAA concentration, were significantly more likely (OR, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 45.9) to be euthanized or develop complications.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Concentrations of SAA and haptoglobin at admission were not significantly correlated with outcome in horses with inflammatory conditions. Acute-phase proteins likely have more utility in serial analysis rather than testing at a single time point for horses with inflammatory conditions.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of the acute-phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin as prognostic indicators in horses with colic with regard to the need for surgical intervention, development of complications, and hospitalization cost and duration.

DESIGN Prospective observational study.

ANIMALS 20 clinically normal horses and 42 horses with colic.

PROCEDURES Total WBC and neutrophil counts and plasma fibrinogen, SAA, and haptoglobin concentrations were compared between healthy (control) horses and horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital for colic. Clinicopathologic values were compared between medical and surgical colic cases to test the ability of acute-phase proteins to predict indication for surgical intervention, development of complications, and duration and cost of hospitalization.

RESULTS Mean SAA concentration was significantly higher in the surgical group, compared with that for both the control and medical groups. Haptoglobin concentration did not differ significantly among groups. Horses with colic and an abnormally increased SAA concentration (> 5 μg/mL) were more likely to be managed surgically than medically (OR, 5.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 22.8). Horses with small intestinal lesions had significantly higher SAA concentrations than did control horses. Euthanasia due to a poor prognosis or the development of thrombophlebitis was more likely for horses with an SAA concentration > 5 μg/mL (OR, 7.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 52.4). A weak positive correlation (r = 0.30) was observed between cost of treatment and SAA concentration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Horses with colic that had an abnormally increased SAA concentration were more likely to require surgical intervention, develop thrombophlebitis, or be euthanized because of a poor prognosis despite treatment.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare serum total protein (sTP) and serum IgG (sIgG) concentrations In neonatal calves administered colostrum or a bovine serum-based colostrum replacement (CR) product followed by a bovine serum-based colostrum supplement (CS) product.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—18 Jersey and 269 Holstein neonatal heifer calves.

Procedures—141 calves were given 4 L of colostrum in 1 or 2 feedings (first or only feeding was provided ≤ 2 hours after birth; when applicable, a second feeding was provided between 2 and 12 hours after birth). Other calves (n = 146) were fed 2 L of a CR product ≤ 2 hours after birth and then 2 L of a CS product between 2 and 12 hours after birth. Concentrations of sTP and sIgG were measured 1 to 7 days after birth. Data from cohorts on individual farms and for all farms were analyzed.

Results—Mean sTP and sIgG concentrations differed significantly between feeding groups. In calves fed colostrum and calves fed CR and CS products, mean ± SD sTP concentration was 5.58 ± 0.67 g/dL and 5.26 ± 0.54 g/dL, respectively, and mean sIgG concentration was 1,868 ± 854 mg/dL and 1,320 ± 620 mg/dL, respectively. The percentage of calves that had failure of passive transfer of immunity (ie, sIgG concentrations < 1,000 mg/dL) was not significantly different between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that sequential feeding of bovine serum-based CR and CS products to neonatal calves is an alternative to feeding colostrum for achieving passive transfer of immunity.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To estimate an appropriate isolation period for dogs infected with canine influenza A H3N2 virus on the basis of the duration of virus shedding.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 16 dogs, from 3 Chicago area shelters, naturally infected with canine influenza A H3N2 virus.

PROCEDURES Medical records of 16 affected dogs were reviewed. Nasal swab specimens from each dog had been tested periodically for a minimum of 15 days following an initial positive real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) assay result for influenza A virus shedding. Amplicons were purified, quantified, and sequenced by the Sanger DNA sequencing technique. Virus isolation and sequence results of canine influenza A H3N2 virus from nasal swab specimens were obtained in conjunction with signalment, description of clinical signs, type of treatment, and outcome.

RESULTS Viruses from each dog were identified as canine influenza A H3N2 virus on the basis of DNA sequencing. The interval between first and last positive rRT-PCR assay results ranged from 13 to 24 days, whereas the time interval from first reported clinical signs to last positive assay results ranged from 15 to 26 days. Isolation of canine influenza A H3N2 virus was successful in the late shedding period from nasal swab specimens of 4 dogs at 15 and 20 days after the first positive rRT-PCR assay result and 18 to 20 days after the first clinical signs. Clinical signs resolved for all dogs that remained in the shelters during the testing period.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dogs infected with H3N2 virus should be isolated for a period of ≥ 21 days following onset of illness. Even when resolution of clinical signs occurs sooner than 21 days, shedding of H3N2 virus may persist.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association