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History

A 7-month-old sexually intact male domestic longhair cat was evaluated because of unusual skin lesions affecting both ears. The cat had been relinquished by its owner to a county animal shelter. No medical history was available.

Clinical and Gross Findings

On physical examination, the cat was in good body condition with abnormalities limited to both external ear canals and pinnae. The cat had locally extensive crusted and hyperkeratotic proliferative plaques that filled the external and vertical ear canals and extended onto 35% to 50% of the proximal concave portions of both pinnae. Lesions were multifocal at the margins. Surface

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 7.5-year-old 20-kg (44-lb) spayed female Shetland Sheepdog with a several-year history of polycyclic to serpiginous ulcerations on the sparsely haired ventral aspect of the abdomen and inguinal region (Figure 1) was evaluated. Microscopic examination of routine biopsy specimens of the lesions revealed marked, lymphocytic interface dermatitis with focal dermal-epidermal separation. The signalment, history, and clinical and histopathologic findings led to a diagnosis of vesicular cutaneous lupus erythematosus (VCLE), and treatment with prednisolone a (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) and cyclosporine b (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) was initiated.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of fascial abrasion, fasciotomy, and fascial excision on cutaneous wound healing in cats.

Animals—Eight 1- to 3-year-old domestic shorthair cats.

Procedures—8 evenly spaced 4-cm2 skin wounds were created on each cat's dorsum, and the underlying subcutaneous tissue was removed to expose the epaxial muscle fascia. Wounds were randomized to receive 1 of 4 treatments (2 wounds/treatment/cat): fascial abrasion, fasciotomy, fascial excision, or control treatment (muscle fascia not disturbed). Bandages were changed and digital photographs and acetate tracings of the wounds were obtained for planimetry daily for 1 week, every other day for 2 weeks, and then every third day for 3 weeks (ie, 40-day observation period). Digitized images were evaluated for granulation tissue formation, wound contraction (surface area measurements), and area of epithelialization.

Results—The epithelialized area and open and total wound areas did not differ among treatments at any time point. Time to the first appearance of granulation tissue was significantly shorter for all treatment groups, compared with that of the control group. Time to achieve granulation tissue coverage of wound base was significantly shorter following fasciotomy (9.6 days) and fascial excision (9.0 days), compared with that of control treatment (18.5 days) or abrasion (16.7 days). Numbers of wounds that developed exuberant granulation tissue following fascial excision (9/16) and control treatment (3/16) differed significantly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Fasciotomy and fascial excision facilitated early granulation tissue development in cutaneous wounds in cats. In clinical use, these fascial treatments may expedite secondary wound closure or skin grafting.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the stability and retention of viscous formulations of the antifungal drug clotrimazole in vitro and to evaluate retention times, absorption, and histologic response to these compounds when placed in the frontal sinus of dogs.

Animals—6 male Beagles.

Procedures—1% clotrimazole gels were formulated with hydroxypropyl cellulose, poloxamer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium bases. Commercially available 1% clotrimazole creams were also evaluated. Each compound was incubated at 37°C in a funnel. Volume retained and clotrimazole stability were evaluated for 4 weeks. Six compounds were then chosen for in vivo evaluation. The frontal sinuses of 6 dogs were filled with 1 of the 6 compounds. Computed tomographic evaluation was performed weekly for up to 4 weeks to evaluate gel retention. Blood samples were collected to evaluate clotrimazole absorption. Following euthanasia, sinuses were examined histologically.

Results—Commercially available clotrimazole creams were not retained in funnels in vitro. In vivo, hydroxypropyl cellulose– and carboxymethylcellulose-based gels resulted in the most severe inflammatory response and were retained the longest. Poloxamer-based gels had a shorter retention time and were associated with less inflammation. Clotrimazole was minimally absorbed. Despite a marked inflammatory response to several of the clotrimazole-containing gels, no notable adverse clinical responses were observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Poloxamer gels had the most promise for improving drug contact within the frontal sinus of dogs, while limiting the inflammatory response. Poloxamer gels have the additional benefit of improved handling as a result of reverse gelation (ie, they gel when warmed to 37°C).

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association