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  • Author or Editor: Kazuhisa Furuhama x
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Abstract

Objective

To establish a versatile and reliable procedure for the determination of indocyanine green maximal removal rate (ICG Rmax) to measure hepatic functional mass in dogs within 9 hours (9-hour method).

Design

Relation between 9-hour and standard 3-day methods was examined.

Animals

101 healthy dogs.

Procedure

On investigation of the optimal technical conditions allowing completion of all procedures in a day, the appropriate IV administered doses of ICG were 0.125, 0.5, and 2.0 mg/kg of body weight, and the best blood sample collection times for obtaining plasma half-life at these 3 doses were before and 3, 6, and 9 minutes after ICG administration.

Results

Comparison of the 9-hour with 3-day method yielded a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.84, indicating close (P < 0.01) correlation. In the 9-hour method, mean ± SD of ICG Rmax in healthy dogs was 0.24 ± 0.09 mg/kg/min in male (n = 62) and was 0.23 ± 0.06 mg/kg/min in female (n = 21) Beagles, and was 0.21 ± 0.10 mg/kg/min in male (n = 11) and 0.20 ± 0.07 mg/kg/min in female (n = 7) mixed-breed dogs. In Beagles treated orally with carbon tetrachloride (0.1 ml/kg in gelatine capsules) thrice weekly during a 10-week period, plasma alanine transaminase activity plateaued at a high value (> 2,000 IU/L) on day 5, and remained at this value until the end of the study. The ICG Rmax changed accordingly: day 5, 0.17; day 10, 0.11; day 40, 0.05; and day 60, 0.06 mg/kg/min.

Conclusion

The 9-hour method for determination of ICG Rmax correlates favorably with the 3-day method.

Clinical Relevance

This procedure may be practically applied in veterinary clinics in terms of prediction of hepatic functional mass, and for diagnosis of hepatotoxicosis induced by certain compounds. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:803–806)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the use of a single-sample method involving IV administration of iodixanol with a multisample method involving inulin for the estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in cats.

Animals—24 cats, including 15 healthy cats and 9 cats with naturally occurring renal diseases.

Procedures—Each cat was coadministered iodixanol (a nonionic contrast medium; dose providing 40 mg of I/kg) and inulin (50 mg/kg), IV, and blood samples were collected 60, 90, and 120 minutes later. Serum iodixanol and inulin concentrations were determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography and colorimetry, respectively. Serum urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations were also measured.

Results—Analysis of the data from healthy cats and cats with naturally occurring renal diseases revealed an excellent correlation between GFR values estimated by the multisample and single-sample methods with iodixanol. Likewise, GFR values estimated from the single-sample method with iodixanol were closely correlated with those calculated from the multisample method with inulin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—For estimation of GFR in cats, use of a single-sample method with iodixanol, instead of a multisample procedure, may be an expedient tool in both clinical and research settings because of its benefits to patient well-being as a result of reduced stress associated with blood sample collection.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To establish a simplified single-blood-sample method (SBSM) involving iodixanol to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in dogs and compare data provided by that procedure with data provided by a conventional multiple-blood-sample method (MBSM) involving inulin.

ANIMALS 26 healthy dogs and 36 dogs with naturally occurring renal disease.

PROCEDURES Dogs were used in various preliminary experiments to establish protocols for the SBSM and the MBSM of GFR estimation. To evaluate the relationship between GFRs obtained by the SBSM and the MBSM each involving iodixanol, iodixanol (40 mg of I/kg) was administered IV to 26 healthy dogs and 36 dogs with renal disease; blood sample collection was performed before and at 60, 90, and 120 minutes after the injection. To evaluate the relationship between GFRs obtained by the SBSM involving iodixanol and the MBSM involving inulin, iodixanol (40 mg of I/kg) and inulin (50 mg/kg) were coadministered IV to 22 healthy dogs and 3 dogs with renal disease, followed by blood sample collection 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes later. Serum iodixanol and inulin concentrations were separately determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS Findings revealed a correlation (r = 0.99) between GFR estimated by the SBSM and MBSM each involving iodixanol. Likewise, GFR estimated by the SBSM involving iodixanol was correlated (r = 0.89) with that estimated by the MBSM involving inulin.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the SBSM involving iodixanol can be applied to estimate GFR in dogs, instead of use of an MBSM.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research