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Abstract

Case Description—A 1-year-old 32.5-kg (71.5-lb) sexually intact male foxhound-Treeing Walker Coonhound cross was evaluated because of a 2.5-month history of dermatologic lesions, weight loss, and diarrhea.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed muscle wasting, lymphadenopathy, and multifocal pruritic dermatologic lesions of alopecia, thickening, erythema, and follicular casting. Hematologic and serum biochemical analyses revealed nonregenerative anemia, mono-cytosis, hypercalcemia, hyperproteinemia, and hyperglobulinemia. Proteinuria was identified on urinalysis. Hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, and diffuse abdominal lymphadenomegaly were detected on abdominal ultrasonography. A diagnosis of leishmaniasis was confirmed by ELISA detection of serum antibodies against Leishmania spp, a high serum indirect fluorescent antibody titer (1:1,024) against Leishmania infantum, amplification of Leishmania DNA on PCR assay of a whole blood sample and a lymph node aspirate, and histologic identification of suspected Leishmania amastigotes in skin specimens. In addition, the dog had a low CD4+:CD8+ lymphocyte ratio of 1:1.

Treatment and Outcome—The dog was euthanized because of the severity of leishmaniasis and poor prognosis. This dog was from a litter of 10 puppies that included 4 stillborn puppies, 2 puppies that died as neonates, and 1 littermate that was euthanized at 1 year of age because of a high serum antibody titer against Leishmania spp. Eventually the foxhound dam was euthanized because of a high serum antibody titer against Leishmania spp. The dog had been raised with an unaffected littermate, its sire, and an unrelated Treeing Walker Coonhound female that were seronegative for Leishmania infection.

Clinical Relevance—Although vertical disease transmission was suspected, it is possible that L infantum is now endemic in Colorado. Leishmaniasis should be considered in dogs with scaly dermatoses.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To quantitatively and qualitatively compare electroretinography (ERG) recordings in awake, sedated, and anesthetized dogs.

Animals—Six 6-month-old Beagles.

Procedures—A brief ERG protocol for dogs was used. Following 1-minute and subsequent 5-minute dark adaptation, mixed rod-cone responses were recorded bilaterally with a handheld multispecies ERG device with dogs in each of 3 states of consciousness: awake, sedated (dexmedetomidine and butorphanol), and anesthetized (atropine and hydromorphone, followed by propofol and midazolam and anesthetic maintenance with isoflurane). Low- and high-frequency noise levels were quantified via Fourier analysis, and the effect of consciousness state on signal amplitude, implicit time, and noise was analyzed via repeated-measures ANOVA. In addition, 13 veterinary ophthalmologists who were unaware of the dogs’ consciousness states subjectively graded the ERG recording quality, and scores for each tracing were compared.

Results—ERG amplitudes were highest in awake dogs and lowest in anesthetized dogs. Implicit times were shortest in awake dogs and longest in anesthetized dogs. Differences in b-wave amplitudes and a-wave implicit times were significant. Neither low- nor high-frequency noise levels differed significantly among consciousness states. Furthermore, no significant differences were identified among observers’ scores assigned to ERG tracings.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Anesthesia and sedation resulted in significant attenuation and delay of ERG responses in dogs. Chemical restraint of dogs had no consistently significant effect on low- or high-frequency noise levels or on observer perception of signal quality.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess tear and plasma concentrations of doxycycline following oral administration to northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

Design—Pharmacokinetic study.

Animals—18 juvenile northern elephant seals without signs of ocular disease.

Procedures—Study seals were receiving no medications other than a multivitamin and were free from signs of ocular disease as assessed by an ophthalmic examination. Doxycycline (10 or 20 mg/kg [4.5 or 9.1 mg/lb]) was administered orally every 24 hours for 4 days. Tear and plasma samples were collected at fixed time points, and doxycycline concentration was assessed by means of liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Concentration-time data were calculated via noncompartmental analysis.

Results—Following administration of doxycycline (10 mg/kg/d, PO), maximum plasma doxycycline concentration was 2.2 μg/mL at 6.1 hours on day 1 and was 1.5 μg/mL at 4.0 hours on day 4. Administration of doxycycline (20 mg/kg/d, PO) produced a maximum plasma doxycycline concentration of 2.4 μg/mL at 2.3 hours on day 1 and 1.9 μg/mL at 5.8 hours on day 4. Doxycycline elimination half-life on day 4 in animals receiving doxycycline at a dosage of 10 or 20 mg/kg/d was 6.7 or 5.6 hours, respectively. Mean plasma-to-tear doxycycline concentration ratios over all days were not significantly different between the low-dose (9.85) and high-dose (9.83) groups. For both groups, doxycycline was detectable in tears for at least 6 days following cessation of dosing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Oral administration of doxycycline at the doses tested in the present study resulted in concentrations in the plasma and tears of northern elephant seals likely to be clinically effective for treatment of selected cases of systemic infectious disease, bacterial ulcerative keratitis, and ocular surface inflammation. This route of administration should be considered for treatment of corneal disease in northern elephant seals and possibly other related pinniped species.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether Scyphomedusa jellyfish with eversion syndrome had alterations in husbandry conditions, elemental content, or histologic appearance, compared with unaffected jellyfish.

Animals—123 jellyfish (44 with eversion syndrome and 79 without) at 6 institutions.

Procedures—Elemental analyses were performed on 24 jellyfish with eversion syndrome and 49 without, and histologic examinations were performed on 20 jellyfish with eversion syndrome and 30 without. A questionnaire distributed to 39 institutions with Scyphomedusa jellyfish was used to gather information about husbandry, environmental conditions, and prevalence of eversion syndrome.

Results—For the 39 institutions that responded to the questionnaire, prevalence of eversion syndrome ranged from 0% to 30%. For Aurelia aurita, eversion was more common at institutions with only captive-raised and no wild-caught jellyfish. Eversion was most common among young (approx 1- to 2-month-old) growing jellyfish and older (> 6-month-old) jellyfish. Elemental analysis revealed only minor differences between affected and unaffected jellyfish, with great variation among jellyfish from the same institution and among jellyfish from different institutions. Striated muscle degeneration and necrosis and extracellular matrix (mesoglea) degeneration were evident on histologic examination of affected jellyfish.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that eversion syndrome is a complex phenomenon associated with degenerative changes of the bell matrix.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate outcomes for cats treated with orally administered famciclovir 3 times/d for clinical signs attributed to naturally occurring feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) infection and to assess variables related to owner satisfaction with the treatment.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 59 client-owned cats.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to identify cats treated for presumed FHV-1 infection from 2006 through 2013 with ≥ 1 follow-up visit. Signalment, duration of clinical signs, prior treatment, examination findings, diagnostic test results, concurrent treatments, and outcome data were recorded. Owners were asked to complete a survey regarding patient- and treatment-related variables. Data were compared between cats that received low (approx 40 mg/kg [18 mg/lb]) and high (approx 90 mg/kg [41 mg/lb]) doses of famciclovir, PO, 3 times/d.

RESULTS Patient age ranged from 0.03 to 16 years. Conjunctivitis (51/59 [86%]), keratitis (51 [86%]), blepharitis (19 [32%]), nasal discharge or sneezing (10 [17%]), and dermatitis (4 [7%]) were common findings. Clinical improvement was subjectively graded as marked in 30 (51%) cats, mild in 20 (34%), and nonapparent in 9 (15%). Median time to improvement was significantly shorter, and degree of improvement was significantly greater in the highdose group than in the low-dose group. Adverse effects potentially attributable to famciclovir administration were reported for 10 cats. On the basis of survey responses, most (29/32 [91%]) owners were satisfied with their cat's treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Famciclovir at the prescribed dosages was associated with improved clinical signs in cats with presumed FHV-1 infection, and few adverse effects were attributed to the treatment. Further studies are needed to assess whether a famciclovir dosage of 90 versus 40 mg/kg, PO, 3 times/d would result in increased efficacy and shorter treatment time.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association