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  • Author or Editor: Kate P. Sharon x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To develop methods to identify and characterize activity monitor (AM) data signatures for jumps performed by cats.

ANIMALS

13 healthy, client-owned cats without evidence of osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease.

PROCEDURES

Each cat was fitted with the same AM, individually placed in an observation room, then simultaneously recorded by 3 video cameras during the observation period (5 to 8 hours). Each cat was encouraged to jump up (JU), jump down (JD), and jump across (JA) during the observation period. Output from the AM was manually annotated for jumping events, each of which was characterized by functional data analysis yielding relevant coefficients. The coefficients were then used in linear discriminant analysis to differentiate recorded jumps as JUs, JDs, or JAs. To assess the model's ability to distinguish among the 3 jump types, a leave-one-out cross-validation method was used, and the misclassification error rate of the overall categorization of the model was calculated.

RESULTS

Of 731 jumping events, 29 were misclassified. Overall, the mean misclassification error rate per cat was 5.4% (range, 0% to 12.5%), conversely indicating a correct classification rate per cat of 94.6%.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that the model was successful in correctly identifying JUs, JDs, and JAs in healthy cats. With advancements in AM technology and data processing, there is potential for the model to be applied in clinical settings as a means to obtain objective outcome measures.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize clinical, clinicopathologic, and hepatic histopathologic features and outcome for dogs with probable ketoconazole-induced liver injury.

ANIMALS

15 dogs with suspected ketoconazole-induced liver injury that underwent liver biopsy.

PROCEDURES

Medical record data were summarized regarding signalment, clinical signs, clinicopathologic and hepatic histopathologic findings, concurrent medications, ketoconazole dose, treatment duration, and outcome.

RESULTS

Median age and body weight were 8.2 years (range, 5 to 15 years) and 13.0 kg (28.6 lb; range, 8.2 to 38.0 kg [18.0 to 83.6 lb]), respectively. The most common breed was Cocker Spaniel (n = 5). All dogs received ketoconazole to treat cutaneous Malassezia infections. Median daily ketoconazole dose was 7.8 mg/kg (3.5 mg/lb; range, 4.4 to 26.0 mg/kg [2.0 to 11.8 mg/lb]), PO. Treatment duration ranged from 0.3 to 100 cumulative weeks (intermittent cyclic administration in some dogs); 6 dogs were treated for ≤ 10 days. Common clinical signs included lethargy, anorexia, and vomiting. All dogs developed high serum liver enzyme activities. Hepatic histopathologic findings included variable lobular injury, mixed inflammatory infiltrates, and conspicuous aggregates of ceroid-lipofuscin–engorged macrophages that marked regions of parenchymal damage. Five dogs developed chronic hepatitis, including 3 with pyogranulomatous inflammation. Of the 10 dogs reported to have died at last follow-up, survival time after illness onset ranged from 0.5 to 165 weeks, with 7 dogs dying of liver-related causes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings for dogs with hepatotoxicosis circumstantially associated with ketoconazole treatment suggested proactive monitoring of serum liver enzyme activities is advisable before and sequentially after initiation of such treatment.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association