Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Karina D. Valerius x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Objective

To determine response rate and remission as well as survival times for dogs with multicentric lymphoma treated first with doxorubicin alone or in combination with asparaginase and then with cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone (CVP) and to identify prevalence of toxicoses associated with this protocol and factors associated with prognosis.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

121 dogs.

Procedure

Variables evaluated for prognostic value were initial response rate to chemotherapy, age, breed, sex, body weight, histologic grade, clinical stage and substage, previous corticosteroid treatment, and serum calcium concentration.

Results

Median overall remission and survival times for all 121 dogs were 205 and 237 days, respectively. Response rate (complete or partial response) was 88%. Ten dogs were hospitalized because of toxicoses associated with doxorubicin, and 19 dogs were hospitalized because of toxicoses associated with CVP. Asparaginase favorably influenced the initial response rate, but did not significantly influence overall remission or survival times. Initial response rate to chemotherapy, body weight. clinical substage, and serum calcium concentration was found to have prognostic value.

Clinical Implications

For dogs with multicentric lymphoma, treatment with doxorubicin alone or in combination with asparaginase and then with CVP resulted in an acceptable response rate and low prevalence of toxicoses. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:512–516)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine effects of dietary cysteine on blood sulfur amino acids (SAA), reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in cats.

Animals

12 healthy adult cats.

Procedure

Cats were fed diets with a nominal (0.50 g/100 g dry matter [DM]), moderate (1.00 g/100 g DM), or high (1.50 g/100 g DM) cysteine content in a 3 × 3 Latin square design with blocks of 8 weeks’ duration. Venous blood samples were collected after each diet had been fed for 4 and 8 weeks, and a CBC and serum biochemical analyses were performed; poikilocyte, reticulocyte, and Heinz body counts were determined; and MDA, GSH, GSSG, and SAA concentrations were measured.

Results

Blood cysteine and MDA concentrations were not significantly affected by dietary cysteine content. Blood methionine, homocysteine, and GSSG concentrations were significantly increased when cats consumed the high cysteine content diet but not when they consumed the moderate cysteine content diet, compared with concentrations obtained when cats consumed the nominal cysteine content diet. Blood GSH concentrations were significantly increased when cats consumed the moderate or high cysteine content diet.

Conclusions

Increased dietary cysteine content promotes higher blood methionine, homocysteine, GSH, and GSSG concentrations in healthy cats.

Clinical Relevance

Supplemental dietary cysteine may be indicated to promote glutathione synthesis and ameliorate adverse effects of oxidative damage induced by disease or drugs. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:328–333)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To determine the effectiveness and safety of asparaginase administered SC versus IM for treatment of multicentric lymphoma in dogs receiving doxorubicin.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

49 dogs with multicentric lymphoma

Procedure

Dogs were treated with doxorubicin every 3 weeks, for a total of 5 treatments, and were given 3 weekly treatments of asparaginase, SC or IM. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, mean plasma asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, and glutamic acid concentrations were determined in dogs before and during treatment with asparaginase (10,000 U/m2 of body surface area, once a week for 3 weeks). Asparaginase was administered SC in 23 dogs and IM in 26 dogs. Variables evaluated included time to response to chemotherapy, remission and survival times, and clinical and serum biochemical indicators of toxicoses

Results

Using the World Health Organization's staging system for lymphoma, 30 dogs were in clinical stage III and 19 were in clinical stage IV. One week after asparaginase treatment, plasma asparagine concentrations were low and plasma aspartic acid, glutamine, and glutamic acid concentrations were high. Differences in plasma amino acid concentrations were not found between SC and IM groups. For dogs in clinical stage IV, IM administration of asparaginase significantly decreased the number of days to complete remission, compared with SC administration (8 vs 17 days, respectively). For dogs in clinical stage III, IM administration favorably increased the duration of first remission (191 vs 103 days) and survival time (289 vs 209 days). Overall, dogs treated IM had a faster response to chemotherapy (9 vs 15 days), a longer remission (191 vs 109 days), and a longer survival time (286 vs 198 days), compared with all dogs treated SC. Asparaginase toxicoses were not observed regardless of the route of administration.

Clinical Implications

For dogs with multicentric lymphoma that are receiving doxorubicin, IM treatment with asparaginase is more effective than SC treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:353–356)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association