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  • Author or Editor: Kaitlyn M. Mullen x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the feasibility of sidestream dark field (SDF) video microscopy for the evaluation of the jejunal microvasculature of healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

30 healthy sexually intact female shelter dogs anesthetized for ovariohysterectomy.

PROCEDURES

Preoperative physical and clinicopathologic assessments were performed to confirm health status. Then healthy dogs were anesthetized, and the abdomen was incised at the ventral midline for ovariohysterectomy and jejunal microvasculature evaluation. An SDF video microscope imaged the microvasculature of 2 sites of a portion of the jejunum, and recorded videos were analyzed with software capable of quantitating parameters of microvascular health. Macrovascular parameters (heart rate, respiratory rate, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation) were also recorded during anesthesia.

RESULTS

Quantified jejunal microvascular parameters included valid microvascular density (mean ± SD, 251.72 ± 97.10 μm/mm), RBC-filling percentage (66.96 ± 8.00%), RBC column width (7.11 ± 0.72 μm), and perfused boundary region (2.17 ± 0.42 μm). The perfused boundary region and RBC-filling percentage had a significant negative correlation. Strong to weak positive correlations were noted among the perfused boundary regions of small-, medium-, and large-sized microvessels. No significant correlations were identified between microvascular parameters and age, body weight, preoperative clinicopathologic results, or macrovascular parameters.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Interrogation of the jejunal microvasculature of healthy dogs with SDF video microscopy was feasible. Results of this study indicated that SDF video microscopy is worth additional investigation, including interrogation of diseased small intestine in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the efficacy of ethylene oxide (EtOH) sterilization of 4 different waterproof camera cases and the ability of those sterilized cases to maintain a sterile barrier for intraoperative camera use.

SAMPLE

3 action cameras, 1 smartphone, and associated waterproof cases.

PROCEDURES

Cases were inoculated by immersion in medium containing Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and then manually cleaned and subjected to EtOH sterilization. Cameras were disinfected, loaded into sterile cases, and sterilely operated for 2 hours. Samples were collected from cases after inoculation, EtOH sterilization, camera loading, and 1 and 2 hours of operation and from all cameras after 2 hours of operation. Procedures were repeated twice, followed by an additional challenge round wherein cameras were purposefully contaminated prior to loading. All samples underwent bacterial culture.

RESULTS

All cases were successfully sterilized, and loading of nonsterile cameras into sterile cases caused no contamination when cameras had been disinfected beforehand. Nonpathogenic environmental contaminants were recovered from 6 of 64 culture samples and 2 of 4 room samples. During the challenge round, only the postload sample for 1 case yielded E coli, suggesting sterile glove contamination; however, postload, 1-hour, and 2-hour samples for the GoPro case yielded E coli and S pseudintermedius, suggesting major contamination.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that the evaluated cases can be safely sterilized with EtOH and used for image acquisition by aseptically prepared surgeons when cameras are disinfected prior to loading. Except for the GoPro camera, camera use did not jeopardize sterile integrity.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the rate of postoperative dehiscence on the basis of intraoperative anastomotic leak test results (ie, positive or negative for leakage or testing not performed) between dogs that underwent hand-sewn anastomosis (HSA) or functional end-to-end stapled anastomosis (FEESA) of the small intestine.

ANIMALS

131 client-owned dogs that underwent 144 small intestinal anastomoses (94 FEESA and 50 HSA).

PROCEDURES

Medical records were searched to identify dogs that had undergone a small intestinal anastomosis (HSA or FEESA) from January 2008 through October 2019. Data were collected regarding signalment, indication for surgery, location of the anastomosis, surgical technique, the presence of preoperative septic peritonitis, performance of intraoperative leak testing, development of postoperative dehiscence, and duration of follow-up.

RESULTS

Intraoperative leak testing was performed during 62 of 144 (43.1%) small intestinal anastomoses, which included 26 of 94 (27.7%) FEESAs and 36 of 50 (72.0%) HSAs. Thirteen of 144 (9.0%) anastomoses underwent dehiscence after surgery (median, 4 days; range, 2 to 17 days), with subsequent septic peritonitis, including 10 of 94 (10.6%) FEESAs and 3 of 50 (6.0%) HSAs. The incidence of postoperative dehiscence was not significantly different between FEESAs and HSAs; between anastomoses that underwent intraoperative leak testing and those that did not, regardless of anastomotic technique; or between anastomoses with positive and negative leak test results. Hand-sewn anastomoses were significantly more likely to undergo leak testing than FEESAs. Preoperative septic peritonitis, use of omental or serosal reinforcement, preoperative serum albumin concentration, and surgical indication were not significantly different between anastomotic techniques.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Performance of intraoperative anastomotic leak testing, regardless of the anastomotic technique, was not associated with a reduction in the incidence of postoperative anastomotic dehiscence.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association