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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effects of ileocecocolic junction (ICJ) resection on gastrointestinal signs, biochemical parameters, and nutritional variables in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

20 dogs and 15 cats that underwent ICJ resection between January 2008 and June 2020.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs and cats that underwent ICJ resection were reviewed, and clinical signs, laboratory abnormalities, and nutritional information were obtained. Additional follow-up information was obtained by contacting primary care veterinarians or owners. A subset of dogs (n = 6) and cats (2) were evaluated in the hospital via clinical examination, clinicopathologic testing, nutritional testing, and abdominal ultrasound.

RESULTS

Twenty dogs and 15 cats underwent resection of the ICJ for treatment of a variety of conditions. Ten of 20 dogs (50%) and 11/15 cats (73%) were reported by their owners to have a good long-term outcome based on the lack of long-term gastrointestinal signs or the ability to control gastrointestinal signs with diet and supplements alone. Despite owner-reported good outcomes, long-term diarrhea, weight loss, and muscle loss were common. Of the 6 dogs evaluated in the hospital, 3/6 (50%) had muscle loss, 2/6 (33%) had low taurine concentrations, and 1 dog each had low cobalamin, folate, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and ionized calcium. Neither of the 2 cats evaluated in the hospital had nutritional abnormalities identified.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Owners should be informed of the possibility of long-term gastrointestinal clinical signs and the potential need for long-term nutritional management after ICJ resection.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To create antibiograms for commonly cultured organisms in a small animal tertiary care hospital following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and to compare these local resistance patterns to published first-tier antimicrobial recommendations.

SAMPLE

Urine (n = 429), respiratory (41), and skin (75) isolates cultured from dogs between January 1, 2019, and December 31, 2020, at the Tufts University Foster Hospital for Small Animals.

PROCEDURES

MIC and susceptibility interpretations were recorded for multiple sites for 2 years. Sites with greater than 30 isolates for at least 1 organism were included. Urinary, respiratory, and skin antibiograms were created using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints and guidelines.

RESULTS

Urinary Escherichia coli had a higher susceptibility percentage for amoxicillin–clavulanate (80% [221/275]) than amoxicillin alone (64% [175/275]). Respiratory E coli were greater than 80% susceptible to only 2 antimicrobials (imipenem, amikacin). Of skin Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates, 40% (30/75) were methicillin-resistant and frequently also displayed resistance to non-beta lactam antimicrobials. Susceptibility to recommended first-line antimicrobials varied and was greatest for gram-negative urinary isolates and lowest for methicillin-resistant S pseudintermedius skin isolates and respiratory E coli.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Local antibiogram creation identified frequent resistance that may preclude the use of guideline-recommended first-line therapy. High levels of resistance identified in methicillin-resistant S pseudintermedius isolates supports growing concern for methicillin-resistant staphylococci in veterinary patients. This project highlights the need for population-specific resistance profiles to be used in conjunction with national guidelines.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association