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  • Author or Editor: Julia M. Matera x
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Abstract

Objective—To assess viability of innervation in bowel segments appearing macroscopically viable from dogs with intussusception.

Animals—7 dogs without gastrointestinal dysfunction that had been euthanized for reasons unrelated to the study (control dogs) and 13 dogs with intussusception that underwent enterectomy and intestinal anastomosis (affected dogs).

Procedures—A total of 31 samples of intestinal tissue were obtained from the control dogs; 28 samples were obtained from affected dogs during surgery. Samples were histologically and immunohistochemically prepared and subjectively scored for degree of vacuolization and staining, respectively. Other data collected included mean muscle cell density of circular and longitudinal muscular layers, ratio between areas of muscular layers, mean number of myenteric plexuses, mean ganglion cell density of myenteric plexuses, and degree of degeneration in neuronal plexuses as estimated through synaptophysin and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) immunoreactivity.

Results—Mean muscle cell density of longitudinal muscular layers, ratio between areas of muscular layers, and synaptophysin immunoreactivity did not differ significantly between affected and control dogs; values of all other variables did. Correlations were evident between mean ganglion cell density in myenteric plexuses and mean muscle cell density in circular muscular layers, degree of neuronal degeneration in myenteric plexuses and NSE immunoreactivity, and degree of neuronal degeneration in myenteric plexuses and mean ganglion cell density of myenteric plexuses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Innervation may be impaired in bowel segments that appear macroscopically viable. Therefore, careful evaluation of preserved surgical margins during enterectomy and enteroanastomosis and monitoring of digestive function after surgery are important.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association