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  • Author or Editor: Joy L. Vaughan x
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Summary

Thirty-two mixed-breed male and female cats were blocked by sex, arranged by body weight from greatest to least, and allocated to 4 groups of 8 (4 male, 4 female) cats, using random numbers. Cats in each of 3 groups were treated orally with a 7% suspension formulation of lufenuron at dosage of 15, 30, or 45 mg/kg of body weight. Cats in the fourth group were treated orally with an excipient suspension without lufenuron. Cats were infested with newly emerged, unfed cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis felis) on days - 7 and — 3 before treatment and at approximately weekly intervals after treatment. Flea eggs were collected from beneath each cat on selected days before and after treatment and placed in an artificial rearing medium. Flea eggs and medium were kept for 35 days in an insectary to determine effects of lufenuron or excipient suspension on emergence of adults of the F1 generation. Lufenuron was 100% effective in inhibiting development of C felis at all dosages for 11 days after treatment. Thereafter, efficacy exceeded 92% in all dosages groups. On day 32, when the study was terminated, efficacy for each of the dosage groups was: 15 mg/kg, 95.2%; 30 mg/ kg, 98.2%; and 45 mg/kg, 99.6%. Adverse reactions or side effects were not observed in cats, regardless of treatment dosage.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives

To identify the lowest single dose of lufenuron injected SC that results in a 90% disruption of the flea (Ctenocephalides felis) life cycle for 6 months in cats.

Animals

40 domestic shorthair cats (20 males, 20 females) between 5 and 7 months old.

Procedure

Cats were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 eight-cat groups and experimentally infested with C felis on days −8, −7, −6, and −4. On day 0, cats in the 4 treatment groups were treated with an injectable formulation of lufenuron at doses of 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. Control cats received the injectable formulation without lufenuron. Experimental infestations were repeated and flea eggs collected at various intervals for 196 days after treatment. Eggs were placed in media and incubated in an insectary for 28 days to determine effects of injectable lufenuron on egg and larval development. Number of adults that emerged from eggs were compared among groups.

Results

Lufenuron injected once at a dose of 10 or 20 mg/kg, but not at 2.5 or 5 mg/kg, resulted in a 90% decrease in number of adult fleas emerging from eggs for 196 days after treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Results indicate that control of flea egg and larval development for at least 6 months can be achieved in cats with a single SC injection of lufenuron (10 mg/kg). The injectable formulation may provide veterinarians and cat owners an alternative to the tablet formulation of lufenuron. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1513–1515)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Twenty-four, adult, female Beagles were arranged by body weight from greatest to least and allocated to 2 groups of 12 dogs, using random numbers. Dogs were housed collectively in 2 adjacent metal buildings, each divided into 4 rooms measuring 2.1 × 3.7 m. Each room was paneled and carpeted and had an access door to the outside with a connecting run that measured 2.1 × 9.1 m. Each run had a surface consisting of 5 cm of pea gravel overlaying 5 cm of sand, and was partially covered by an awning that provided shade at its proximal end. For placement in room/run units, dogs in each of the treated and control groups were allotted to 4 subgroups of 3 dogs each. Each subgroup of dogs was placed in a separate room/run unit. Units containing treatment or control subgroups were alternated to avoid placing identically treated subgroups adjacent to each other. Dogs of subgroups A, C, E, and G were treated with lufenuron monthly at a minimal target dosage of 10 mg/kg of body weight; those of subgroups B, D, F, and H were treated with excipient tablets. Dogs were treated on study days 7, 37, 68, and 98. Each dog was infested with 100 newly emerged, unfed, insectary-reared, adult Ctenocephalides felts on each of study days 0 and 2. Thereafter, infestations on all dogs were dependent on continued development of fleas either in the indoor or outdoor environment. Numbers of fleas on each of the treated and control dogs were determined, using a nondestructive counting technique on days 6, 14, 21, 28, 35, 56, 70, 84, 98, 112, and 119. On study day 21 and on each collection day thereafter, numbers of adult fleas recovered from treated dogs were significantly (P < 0.05) fewer than those recovered from control dogs. Proportion reduction of fleas on treated vs control dogs exceeded 90% by study day 35 and 95% by study day 56. Efficacies exceeded 95% on all remaining study days except days 98 (94.4%) and 119 (90%). Results of this study indicate that control of flea populations can be achieved in treated dogs approximately 4 to 5 weeks after initial treatment with lufenuron, and that continued monthly treatments will maintain effective control of flea infestations. Adverse reactions or side effects to treatment with lufenuron were not observed in dogs after treatment at any time throughout the study.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

The efficacy of milbemycin oxime was evaluated at dosages of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mg/kg of body weight in dogs naturally infected with mature Ancylostoma spp, at a dosage of 0.50 mg/kg in dogs with experimentally induced immature and mature A caninum, and at dosages of 0.55 to 0.86 mg/kg in dogs naturally infected with mature Trichuris vulpis. Milbemycin oxime was 95 and 99% effective against mature Ancylostoma spp at dosages of 0.50 and 0.75 mg/kg, respectively, but only 49% effective at a dosage of 0.25 mg/kg. Efficacy was 49% against pulmonary L3-L4 stages of A caninum (36 hours after inoculation), > 80% against L4 (120 hours after inoculation) and early L5 stages (216 hours after inoculation), and > 90% against experimentally induced mature stages (360 hours after inoculation). Milbemycin oxime was also 97% effective in the removal of mature Tr vulpis from naturally infected dogs. Adverse reactions were not observed following treatment in any of the dogs.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research