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  • Author or Editor: Joshuah B. Klutzke x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare hematologic results for juvenile versus adult dogs from shelters that outwardly appeared healthy and were presented for ovariohysterectomy or castration.

ANIMALS

138 dogs from 13 regional shelters.

PROCEDURES

Each dog underwent a physical examination (including use of a flea comb), age estimation by dental eruption characteristics, PCV, CBC, and tests for Dirofilaria immitis antigen and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Ehrlichia canis antibodies. Additional diagnostic tests were performed as needed. Dogs were grouped by age as < 3, ≥ 3 to ≤ 6, or > 6 months of age, with dogs ≤ 6 months of age considered juveniles and dogs > 6 months of age considered adults. Hematologic results were compared across groups.

RESULTS

There were 138 dogs, of which 56 were juveniles (34 dogs < 3 months old; 22 dogs ≥ 3 to ≤ 6 months old) and 82 were adults. Juvenile (vs adult) dogs had lower mean calculated Hct and mean PCV whether dogs with infectious agents or parasites were included or excluded. The mean PCV and mean cell hemoglobin concentration were lower and the reticulocyte count higher for juvenile dogs < 3 months old (35.8%, 33.1 g/dL, and 135,000 reticulocytes/μL) versus adults (44.9%, 34.7 g/dL, and 68,500 reticulocytes/ μL). Most (98.6%) dogs underwent surgery as scheduled; 2 dogs had surgery postponed because of thrombocytopenia or parvovirus infection.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Our findings indicated that outwardly healthy-appearing juvenile shelter dogs often have results for PCV and calculated Hct that are lower than those for adult shelter dogs and adult dog reference intervals but rarely require postponement of ovariohysterectomy or castration.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, and adverse effects of injectable methadone with the pharmacokinetic enhancer fluconazole (methadone-fluconazole), compared with the standard formulation of injectable methadone, in dogs after ovariohysterectomy. We hypothesized that 2 doses of methadone-fluconazole would provide 24 hours of postoperative analgesia.

ANIMALS

3 purpose-bred dogs (pharmacokinetic preliminary study) and 42 female dogs from local shelters (clinical trial) were included.

PROCEDURES

Pharmacokinetics were preliminarily determined. Clinical trial client-owned dogs were blocked by body weight into treatment groups: standard methadone group (methadone standard formulation, 0.5 mg/kg, SC, q 4 h; n = 20) or methadone-fluconazole group (0.5 mg/kg methadone with 2.5 mg/kg fluconazole, SC, repeated once at 6 h; n = 22). All dogs also received acepromazine, propofol, and isoflurane. Surgeries were performed by experienced surgeons, and dogs were monitored perioperatively using the Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Scale–Short Form (CMPS-SF) and sedation scales. Evaluators were masked to treatment.

RESULTS

Findings from pharmacokinetic preliminary studies supported that 2 doses of methadone-fluconazole provide 24 hours of drug exposure. The clinical trial had no significant differences in treatment failures or postoperative CMPS-SF scores between treatments. One dog (methadone-fluconazole group) had CMPS-SF > 6 and received rescue analgesia. All dogs had moderate sedation or less by 1 hour (methadone-fluconazole group) or 4 hours (standard methadone group) postoperatively. Sedation was completely resolved in all dogs the day after surgery.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Methadone-fluconazole with twice-daily administration was well tolerated and provided effective postoperative analgesia for dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Clinical compliance and postoperative pain control may improve with an effective twice-daily formulation.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research