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  • Author or Editor: Joseph Sackman x
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Abstract

Objective—To objectively describe morphometric features of the craniocervical junction region of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and non-CKCS dogs with suspected Chiari-like malformation (CLM) and identify associations between these features and the presence of other malformations in this region.

Animals—216 CKCSs and 58 non-CKCS dogs.

Procedures—Magnetic resonance and computed tomographic images of the head and craniocervical junction region of patients evaluated because of suspected CLM were assessed for cerebellar compression (CC), ventral spinal cord compression at the C1–C2 articulation (medullary kinking), and dorsal spinal cord compression at the C1–C2 articulation (dorsal compression). A compression index was calculated for each of these 3 locations in each dog. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine whether breed (CKCS vs non-CKCS) and compression index values were associated with the presence of other craniocervical junction abnormalities.

Results—All 274 dogs had CC; medullary kinking was identified in 187 (68.2%) and dorsal compression was identified in 104 (38.0%). Atlantooccipital overlapping (AOO) was identified in 76 (27.7%) dogs. Breed of dog (CKCS vs non-CKCS) and value of CC index were the only significant predictors of AOO. The CKCSs had an almost 5-fold decrease in risk of AOO, compared with the non-CKCS dogs, and the risk of AOO nearly doubled for every 10% increase in CC index.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The anatomic abnormality responsible for CC was AOO in a substantial percentage of dogs suspected to have CLM. The CC index value may be used to help differentiate subtypes of craniocervical junction abnormalities in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the usefulness of medical infrared thermal imaging (MITI) as a screening tool for hyperthyroidism in cats, evaluate the need for hair clipping over the ventral aspect of the neck to achieve optimal images, and determine whether there is a change in thermal patterns at 1 and 3 months after radioactive sodium iodide I 131 treatment.

ANIMALS 17 cats with and 12 control cats without hyperthyroidism.

PROCEDURES All cats underwent MITI first with the hair present and then after the hair was clipped. Each cat with hyperthyroidism was subsequently appropriately treated SC with radioiodide; reevaluations, including MITI before and after hair clipping and measurement of serum thyroxine concentration, were performed 1 and 3 months after treatment.

RESULTS The MITI had 80.5% and 87.5% accuracy in differentiating hyperthyroid cats from clinically normal cats before and after the hair over the ventral aspect of the neck was clipped. Among cats with an initial serum thyroxine concentration > 4.0 μg/dL, the success rate for MITI-detected response to radioiodide treatment at the 1-month reevaluation was 92.86% in unshaved cats and 85.71% in shaved cats. The success rate for MITI-detected response to radioiodide treatment at the 3-month reevaluation was 100% in unshaved and shaved cats.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that MITI was successful in differentiating between hyperthyroid cats and clinically normal cats and identifying patients with thyroxine concentration within reference interval after radioactive sodium iodide I 131 treatment.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research