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  • Author or Editor: Joseph F. Boucher x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether sublingual detomidine gel administration to horses would be effective in providing an appropriate degree of sedation and restraint to facilitate completion of veterinary and husbandry procedures under field conditions.

Design—Multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study.

Animals—270 client-owned horses known to require sedation or strong restraint to enable veterinary and husbandry procedures to be performed.

Procedures—Horses randomly received a single dose of detomidine gel (0.04 mg/kg [0.018 mg/lb]) or placebo gel administered sublingually. Horses were sedated to facilitate cleaning the prepuce, cutting of hair with electric clippers, hoof trimming or application of shoes, manual dental floating (ie, rasping or filing of the teeth to remove irregularities), nasogastric passage of a stomach tube or endoscope, and radiography. The primary determinant of efficacy was an assessment by a veterinarian on the ability or inability to successfully conduct the procedure.

Results—171 horses met all the study protocol criteria. One hundred twenty-nine horses were treated with detomidine. The procedure was completed successfully for 76% (98/129) of the detomidine-treated horses, while the procedure was completed successfully for only 7% (3/42) of the placebo-treated horses. The percentage of horses in which the procedure was successfully completed was significantly different between detomidine-treated horses and placebo-treated horses. No serious adverse effects were reported.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Detomidine gel administered to horses sublingually at a dose of 0.04 mg/kg provided an appropriate degree of sedation and restraint to facilitate completion of veterinary and husbandry procedures in horses known to require sedation for such procedures.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of cefovecin sodium in the treatment of cats with naturally occurring skin infections (abscesses and infected wounds).

Design—Multicenter (26 sites), randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial.

Animals—Client-owned cats of any breed with naturally occurring skin infections with associated clinical signs and confirmatory bacteriologic culture results.

Procedures—Cats with clinical signs of skin and soft tissue infection were randomly allocated to receive a single dose of cefovecin (8 mg/kg [3.6 mg/lb], SC) followed by placebo drops administered orally once daily for 14 days or 1 SC placebo injection followed by cefadroxil (22 mg/kg [10 mg/lb], PO, once daily for 14 days). Only one 14-day treatment course was permitted.

Results—Effectiveness of cefovecin in the treatment of cats with abscesses and infected wounds was similar to that of cefadroxil. At the final assessment on day 28, 97% (86/89) of cefovecin-treated cats and 91% (80/88) of cefadroxil-treated cats were considered treatment successes. There were no serious adverse events or deaths related to treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—1 SC injection of 8 mg of cefovecin/kg for the treatment of cats with naturally occurring skin infections (wounds and abscesses) was safe and as effective as cefadroxil administered orally at 22 mg/kg, once daily for 14 days.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy and safety of administration of cefovecin, compared with cefadroxil, for treatment of naturally occurring secondary superficial pyoderma, abscesses, and infected wounds in dogs.

Design—Multicenter, randomized, positive-controlled clinical trial.

Animals—235 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Dogs with clinical signs of skin infection confirmed via bacteriologic culture were randomly allocated to receive a single SC injection of cefovecin (8 mg/kg [3.6 mg/lb]) followed by placebo administered PO twice daily for 14 days or cefadroxil (22 mg/kg [10 mg/lb]) administered PO twice daily for 14 days following a placebo injection. Two 14-day treatment courses were permitted. Treatment success was defined as reduction of clinical signs to mild or absent at the final assessment.

Results—Clinical efficacy achieved with cefovecin in dogs was equivalent to that observed with cefadroxil. At the final assessment, 14 days following the completion of treatment (on day 28 or 42), 92.4% (109/118) of the cefovecin group and 92.3% (108/117) of the cefadroxil group were treatment successes. There were no serious adverse events or deaths related to treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A single cefovecin injection (8 mg/kg) administered SC, which could be repeated once after 14 days, was safe and effective against naturally occurring skin infections in dogs and as effective as cefadroxil administered PO twice daily for 14 or 28 days.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of ceftiofur for treatment of postpartum cows with fever.

Design—Multilocation randomized complete block design trial.

Animals—330 cows.

Procedure—Cows with rectal temperature ≥ 39.5 C (103.1 F) during the first 10 postpartum days were randomly assigned to a treatment (ceftiofur; 1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb] of body weight daily for 3 days) or untreated control group. Cure (no additional or alternative antimicrobial treatment used, rectal temperature < 39.5 C, and no other concurrent clinical signs of disease when evaluated at 9 or 10 days after enrollment), milk production, and rectal temperature were evaluated.

Results—Ceftiofur-treated cows were significantly more likely to be cured than control cows (56.0 vs 28.9%, respectively), with an odds ratio of 3.14 when vaginal discharge (a factor with moderate interaction with treatment) was present at enrollment. Among cows that had an abnormal calving (a significant interaction factor), treated cows had first milking yield 2.27 kg (5 lb) greater than control cows. Treated cows had a significantly greater reduction in rectal temperature (1.19 C [2.14 F]), compared with control cows (1.04 C [1.87 F]).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Parenteral administration of ceftiofur significantly improved cure rate, milk yield, and rectal temperature in postpartum cows with fever and vaginal discharge or dystocia. These findings provide information to determine appropriate treatment for postpartum cows, which for years has been debated in the dairy industry. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:805–808)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association