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  • Author or Editor: Joseph A. DiPietro x
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Summary

In 2 trials, the efficacy of an in-feed preparation of ivermectin was evaluated in 40 pigs naturally infected with endoparasites and Sarcoptes scabiei var suis. Treated pigs (n = 10 in each trial) were fed a ration containing 2 ppm ivermectin for 7 days, followed by consumption of a nonmedicated ration for the remainder of the trial. Control pigs (n = 10 in each trial) were fed a complete, nonmedicated ration for the duration of the trial. Pigs in trial A were monitored for 14 days after treatment; those in trial B were monitored for 35 days after treatment.

In trial A, treatment efficacy of ivermectin was 100% against Ascaris suum, Physocephalus sexalatus, Oesophagostomum dentatum, O brevicaudum, Metastrongylus spp; 99.8% against Ascarops strongylina; 90.9% against Trichuris suis; and 13.1% against Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus. At the terminus of the trial, statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences were observed between numbers of treated and control pigs infected with A suum, Ascarops strongylina, and Oesophagostomum spp. On posttreatment day 14, S scabiei were not found in any scrapings taken from treated pigs, but were found in scrapings from 3 of 10 control pigs. The number of infested pigs in the treatment group was not statistically different from the number of infested pigs in the control group.

In trial B, treatment efficacy was 100% for A suum and Metastrongylus spp; 96.9% for Ascarops strongylina; and 76.9% for M hirudinaceus. At the terminus of the trial, statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences were evident between numbers of treated and control pigs infected with A suum, Ascarops strongylina, and Metastrongylus spp.

On posttreatment days 7, 21, and 35, S scabiei were not found in scrapings taken from treated pigs. On posttreatment days 7, 21, and 35, S scabiei were found in scrapings from 8, 6, and 1 pig, respectively, whereas live mites were not found on scrapings taken from treated pigs on these days. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences were evident between the numbers of infested pigs in the treated and control groups on days 7 and 21.

Ivermectin fed to swine ad libitum in a complete ration at 2 ppm was shown to be highly effective as an anthelmintic and acaricide.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether stress associated with transportation or feed withdrawal increased fecal shedding of Salmonella Typhimurium among pigs experimentally infected with the organism.

Animals

86 healthy pigs.

Procedure

Pigs were challenge exposed with Salmonella Typhimurium at 4 weeks old and reared conventionally. When pigs reached market weight, they were assigned to groups and subjected to various combinations of transportation and feed withdrawal. Ileocecal contents were collected after slaughter and tested for Salmonella Typhimurium.

Results

Salmonella Typhimurium was not detected in feces collected from pigs just prior to slaughter. When feed was withheld for 24 hours prior to slaughter, the proportion of transported pigs with Salmonella Typhimurium in ileocecal contents at the time of slaughter was not significantly different from the proportion of nontransported pigs. However, when feed was not withheld prior to slaughter, the proportion of transported pigs with Salmonella Typhimurium in ileocecal contents at the time of slaughter was significantly higher than the proportion of nontransported pigs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

When carrier pigs remained on feed, transportation stress increased the proportion positive for Salmonella sp. On the basis of results reported here, it is suggested that producers withhold feed from pigs for 24 hours prior to transportation to a slaughter plant. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1155–1158)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Sixteen helminth-free pony foals were inoculated with a mean (±sd) 2,000 (±545.5) infective Parascaris equorum eggs (day 0). Foals were allocated to replicates of 4, and treatments within each replicate were assigned at random. Treatment administered on postinoculation day (pid) 28 included no treatment (control), 0.2 mg of ivermectin/kg of body weight, 10 mg of oxibendazole/kg, or 6.6 mg of pyrantel base (pamoate)/kg. Paste formulations of the anthelmintics were administered orally. The foals were euthanatized 14 days after treatment (pid 42) and examined for P equorum larvae in the small intestine. The mean ± sd (and range) numbers of fourth-stage P equorum larvae recovered from nontreated foals and those treated with ivermectin, pyrantel, or oxibendazole were 1,603.8 ± 1,026.8 (305 to 2,480), 29.3 ± 55.8 (0 to 113), 413.0 ± 568.1 (0 to 1,204), or 889.5 ± 1,123.1 (1 to 2,345), respectively. Compared with the value for control (nontreated) foals, treatment with ivermectin, pyrantel, and oxibendazole was 98.2, 74.2, and 44.5% effective, respectively, when administered 28 days after experimentally induced infection with P equorum. Adverse reactions attributable to treatment were not observed.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association