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  • Author or Editor: Jon G. Whitehair x
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Summary

Data from 10,769 dogs with rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (ccl) were compared with data from a control population of 591,548 dogs to determine whether age, breed, gender, or body weight was associated with prevalence of ccl rupture. Prevalence of ccl rupture increased as dogs became older, with peak prevalence in dogs 7 to 10 years old. Among breeds represented by > 1,000 individuals, Rottweilers, Newfoundlands, and Staffordshire Terriers had the highest prevalence of ccl rupture, whereas Dachshunds, Basset Hounds, and Old English Sheepdogs had the lowest. Neutered dogs, whether male or female, had a higher prevalence of ccl rupture than did sexually intact dogs. The dog's age at the time of ovariohysterectomy was not associated with prevalence of ccl rupture. Dogs weighing > 22 kg had a higher prevalence of ccl rupture, compared with dogs weighing < 22 kg, and tended to rupture their ccl at a younger age.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Seventy dogs were included in a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial to test the efficacy of carprofen (2.2 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 12 h) for relief of clinical signs associated with osteoarthritis. Thirty-six dogs received carprofen, and 34 received a placebo. Response of the dogs was evaluated by comparing results of force plate examination and a graded lameness examination performed before and immediately after 2 weeks of treatment, and by obtaining a subjective assessment of the dog's posttreatment condition from owners and participating veterinarians. A physical examination, CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, and fecal occult blood test were performed before and after treatment to monitor safety. For force plate evaluation, the odds ratio was 3.3, meaning that a dog treated with carprofen was 3.3 times more likely to have a positive response than was a dog treated with the placebo. For evaluation by a veterinarian, the odds ratio was 3.5, and for owner evaluation, the odds ratio was 4.2. Institution where dogs were treated did not have a significant effect on results. A variety of reactions that may have been related to the medication (placebo or carprofen) were recorded; however, none were considered serious. Serum alanine aminotransferase activity was high in 3 dogs (2 that received placebo and 1 that received carprofen) at the conclusion of treatment; none of the 3 dogs were clinically ill. Ten dogs © that received placebo and 5 that received carprofen) had negative pretreatment and positive posttreatment fecal occult blood test results.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association