Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: John T. Farrar x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe development and initial psychometric testing of the Canine Symptom Assessment Scale (CSAS), a multidimensional owner-reported questionnaire instrument, in a population of dogs with solid tumors enrolled in clinical trials.

DESIGN Questionnaire development and validation study.

ANIMALS 238 client-owned dogs with solid tumors.

PROCEDURES A 14-symptom questionnaire was developed. Symptoms were defined as subjective physical disturbances dogs experienced during the course of daily living as assessed through proxy reports of pet owners. For each symptom, owners reported frequency and severity of the symptom and extent of distress caused by the symptom for the dog and the owner. Questionnaire content, symptom prevalence and dimensionality, internal consistency, and factor structure were examined. Construct and criterion validity were examined via comparison with the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI).

RESULTS Symptom prevalence was high, with pain and lack of energy reported in most dogs. Severity, versus frequency, was most highly correlated with both dog and owner distress. Two symptoms were removed from consideration because of poor performance. Analysis of the remaining 12 symptoms revealed that they could be grouped into 3 factors: malaise, anxiety, and digestive upset. The CSAS factor and total scores demonstrated predictable relationships with quality of life and pain scores as measured by the CBPI, including a significant association between increasing symptom burden and decreasing quality of life. The Cronbach α for the CSAS was 0.77.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The 12-item CSAS was a psychometrically sound owner-reported instrument for assessment of symptom frequency and characteristics in client-owned dogs with solid tumors. Potential applications include clinical research and practice settings.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether an activity monitor (AM) could be used to detect changes in activity in dogs with osteoarthritis treated with carprofen or a placebo.

Design—Randomized controlled trial.

Animals—70 dogs with no clinically important abnormalities other than osteoarthritis for which they were not currently being treated.

Procedures—Dogs wore an AM continuously for 21 days. On days 8 through 21, the dogs were treated with carprofen (n = 35) or a placebo (35). Total activity counts for days 1 through 7 (baseline) were compared with total activity counts for days 15 through 21 (endpoint). The change in total activity count from baseline to endpoint was assessed within each treatment group as well as between groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to test for an association between treatment and percentage change in activity counts while controlling for other variables.

Results—For placebo-treated dogs, median baseline total activity count was not significantly different from median endpoint total activity count (1,378,408 vs 1,310,112, respectively). For dogs receiving carprofen, there was a significant increase in median activity count from baseline to endpoint (1,276,427 vs 1,374,133). When age and baseline activity counts were controlled for, dogs in the carpofen-treated group had a 20% increase in activity counts, compared with placebo-treated dogs (95% confidence interval, 10% to 26%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that the AM used in the present study may be a valid outcome assessment tool for documenting improved activity associated with treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe development and initial psychometric testing of an owner-reported questionnaire designed to standardize measurement of general quality of life (QOL) in dogs with cancer.

DESIGN Key-informant interviews, questionnaire development, and field trial.

SAMPLE Owners of 25 dogs with cancer for item development and pretesting and owners of 90 dogs with cancer for reliability and validity testing.

PROCEDURES Standard methods for development and testing of questionnaire instruments intended to measure subjective states were used. Items were generated, selected, scaled, and pretested for content, meaning, and readability. Response items were evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and by assessing internal consistency (Cronbach α) and convergence with global QOL as determined with a visual analog scale. Preliminary tests of stability and responsiveness were performed.

RESULTS The final questionnaire—which was named the Canine Owner-Reported Quality of Life (CORQ) questionnaire—contained 17 items related to observable behaviors commonly used by owners to evaluate QOL in their dogs. Several items pertaining to physical symptoms performed poorly and were omitted. The 17 items were assigned to 4 factors—vitality, companionship, pain, and mobility—on the basis of the items they contained. The CORQ questionnaire and its factors had high internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.68 to 0.90) and moderate to strong correlations (r = 0.49 to 0.71) with global QOL as measured on a visual analog scale. Preliminary testing indicated good test-retest reliability and responsiveness to improvements in overall QOL.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The CORQ questionnaire was a valid, reliable owner-reported questionnaire that measured general QOL in dogs with cancer and showed promise as a clinical trial outcome measure for quantifying changes in individual dog QOL occurring in response to cancer treatment and progression.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop and psychometrically test an owner self-administered questionnaire designed to assess severity and impact of chronic pain in dogs with osteoarthritis.

Sample Population—70 owners of dogs with osteoarthritis and 50 owners of clinically normal dogs.

Procedures—Standard methods for the stepwise development and testing of instruments designed to assess subjective states were used. Items were generated through focus groups and an expert panel. Items were tested for readability and ambiguity, and poorly performing items were removed. The reduced set of items was subjected to factor analysis, reliability testing, and validity testing.

Results—Severity of pain and interference with function were 2 factors identified and named on the basis of the items contained in them. Cronbach's α was 0.93 and 0.89, respectively, suggesting that the items in each factor could be assessed as a group to compute factor scores (ie, severity score and interference score). The test-retest analysis revealed κ values of 0.75 for the severity score and 0.81 for the interference score. Scores correlated moderately well (r = 0.51 and 0.50, respectively) with the overall quality-of-life (QOL) question, such that as severity and interference scores increased, QOL decreased. Clinically normal dogs had significantly lower severity and interference scores than dogs with osteoarthritis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A psychometrically sound instrument was developed. Responsiveness testing must be conducted to determine whether the questionnaire will be useful in reliably obtaining quantifiable assessments from owners regarding the severity and impact of chronic pain and its treatment on dogs with osteoarthritis.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) can detect changes in dogs with osteoarthritis treated with an NSAID or a placebo.

Design—Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Animals—70 dogs with osteoarthritis.

Procedures—Owners completed the CBPI on day 0. Dogs received carprofen or a placebo on days 1 through 14. Owners completed the CBPI again on day 14. Pain severity and pain interference scores from the CBPI were calculated, and the change from day 0 to day 14 was assessed within each group and between groups.

Results—No significant differences were detected in median scores for pain severity (3.50 and 3.25 on days 0 and 14, respectively) and pain interference (3.92 and 3.25 on days 0 and 14, respectively) in dogs receiving the placebo. Dogs receiving carprofen had significant changes in median scores for pain severity (4.25 to 2.25 on days 0 and 14, respectively) and pain interference (4.33 to 2.67 on days 0 and 14, respectively). There was a significantly greater improvement in pain severity and pain interference scores in dogs treated with carprofen, compared with improvement in scores for dogs receiving the placebo.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The CBPI was able to detect improvements in pain scores in dogs with osteoarthritis treated with an NSAID or a placebo. These results, in combination with previous reliability and validity testing, support the use of the CBPI to obtain quantifiable assessments from owners regarding the severity and impact of chronic pain and treatment for dogs with osteoarthritis.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association