Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: John Speciale x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Summary

Gamma-vinyl-γ-aminobutyric acid is a novel antiepileptic drug that exerts its effects by increasing the concentration of γ-aminobutyric acid in the brain. The mechanism of action involves irreversible inhibition of the metabolic pathway of γ-aminobutyric acid. The drug was administered to 14 dogs in conjunction with other anticonvulsants, in an attempt to control refractory epilepsy. Four of these dogs had clinically relevant evidence of decreased seizure frequency. In 4 dogs, response to the drug was no better than response to phenobarbital alone. In 2 dogs, seizure control improved, but γ-vinyl-γ-aminobutyric acid was withdrawn because of development of hemolytic anemia. For various reasons, the therapeutic effect in the remaining 4 dogs could not be evaluated.

This study of only 14 dogs illustrates some of the problems that confound our ability to judge the efficacy of anticonvulsant treatment.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Over a reporting period of 5 years, craniotomy was performed in 26 dogs and 5 cats with various intracranial lesions. X-ray computed tomography was performed in all animals prior to surgery. Twenty dogs and all cats had intracranial neoplasms; of these, 14 were meningioma, and 11 represented a wide variety of brain tumors and skeletal tumors. Three dogs were treated surgically for traumatic, open-skull fractures with cerebral damage, and 3 underwent biopsy to evaluate chronic inflammatory brain disease. The overall median survival time was 212 days, the 1-year survival rate was 39%, and the 2-year survival rate was 20%. Dogs and cats with meningioma survived a mean 198 and 485 days, respectively, with 1-year survival rates of 30% for dogs and 50% for cats. The overall median survival time for animals with tumors other than meningeal intracranial neoplasms was 414 days, with a 1-year survival rate of 40%. The death of 19% of all animals could be related to the combination of advanced brain disease and surgery. Because fatality seldom occurred as a direct result of surgery, morbidity and mortality associated with craniotomy in pet animals can be seen as acceptably low. In 29 of 34 craniotomies, dura mater defects were left unsutured and no adverse effects were seen.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Cytosolic assay was used to detect gonadal steroid receptors in brain tumor tissue from 6 dogs and 2 cats. For 4 samples, the maximal number of binding sites and the equilibrium dissociation constant were calculated, using Scatchard analysis. The concentration of receptor protein that was discovered was similar to that detected in hormone-sensitive tumors.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research