Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for

  • Author or Editor: John Fischer x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare signalment, clinical signs, diet, echocardiographic findings, and outcome for pit bull–type breeds diagnosed between 2015 and 2022 with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or with DCM diagnosed by a cardiologist but that did not meet all study echocardiographic criteria (DCM-C).

ANIMALS

91 dogs with DCM and 11 dogs with DCM-C.

PROCEDURES

Data were collected on clinical findings, echocardiographic measurements, and diet at the time of diagnosis (for 76/91 dogs); echocardiographic changes; and survival.

RESULTS

For dogs with diet information available for time of diagnosis, 64/76 (84%) dogs were eating nontraditional commercial diets, while 12/76 (16%) were eating traditional commercial diets. There were few differences between diet groups at baseline, with congestive heart failure and arrhythmias common in both groups. Thirty-four dogs with known baseline diet and diet change status had follow-up echocardiograms between 60 and 1,076 days later (traditional diet, n = 7; nontraditional diet that changed diets, 27; and nontraditional diet group without diet change, 0). Dogs in the nontraditional diet group that changed diets had a significantly greater decrease in normalized left ventricular diameter (diastolic, P = .02; systolic, P = .048) and the left atrium-to-aorta ratio (P = .002) and a significantly greater increase in fractional shortening (P = .02) compared to dogs eating traditional diets. Dogs eating nontraditional diets with diet change (n = 45; P < .001) and dogs eating traditional diets (12; P < .001) had a significantly longer survival time compared to dogs eating nontraditional diets without diet change (4). Dogs with DCM-C also had significant echocardiographic improvements after diet change.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Congestive heart failure and arrhythmias were common in pit bull–type breeds with DCM. Those eating nontraditional diets that changed diets had significant improvements in echocardiographic measurements after diet change.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Escherichia coli isolate 7996-90, obtained from a calf with diarrhea, had negative results of tests for K-88, K-99, 987P, F41, CS31A, F1845, F165 or E coli adherence factor adhesins and had negative results of tests for the toxins heat-labile, heat-stable A, heatstable B, Shiga-like toxin (slt)-I or slt-II. Strain 7996-90 had localized adherence to HEp-2 cells, caused actin rearrangement in host cells to which it adhered, hybridized with the eaeA probe, and produced the 94-kd outer membrane protein associated with attaching effacing lesions. This isolate caused attaching effacing lesions in Caco-2 cell polar monolayers, rabbit intestinal loops, and the intestines of gnotobiotic pigs. The isolate belongs to serotype O26:NM and is considered a class-II attaching effacing enteropathogenic E coli. Until recent addition of more sensitive assays at veterinary diagnostic laboratories, isolates such as 7996-90 were not readily recognized as pathogens because they failed to fit into the enterohemorrhagic E coli group, members of which, be definition, produce slt. The assays described can facilitate diagnosis of attaching effacing E coli infection when histologic evaluation is hampered by autolysis.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Parvovirus infection was confirmed by fluorescent antibody staining of or viral isolation from specimens of small intestine in 181 (17%) of 1,110 dogs necropsied between July 1, 1987 and Dec 31, 1990. Clostridium perfringens was isolated from 74 (69%) of 108 dogs with parvovirus infection from which specimens of jejunum also had been obtained for culture of anaerobic bacteria. Gram-positive bacilli in association with focal to diffuse necrosis of the superficial portions of the villi were observed in histologic sections of specimens of small intestine from 56 (98%) of 57 dogs from which parvovirus and C perfringens had been identified. These findings indicate that C perfringens frequently proliferates in dogs with parvovirus infection.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Parvovirus infection was confirmed by fluorescent antibody staining or viral culturing in 137 (22%) of 615 necropsy accessions from dogs at the Missouri Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory from Jan 1, 1987 through Sept 30, 1988. Septicemic colibacillosis was diagnosed in 88 (90%) of the 98 canine parvovirus-positive accessions in which liver or lung was cultured bacteriologically. Pulmonary edema or alveolitis similar to that seen in the human adult respiratory distress syndrome was observed in 63 (69%) of the 91 canine parvovirus-positive accessions in which the lungs were examined histologically.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Salmonella choleraesuis was isolated in pure or mixed bacterial cultures from 153 swine necropsied between Jan 1, 1987 and Dec 31, 1990. Pneumonia was seen in 99 of 109 swine from which this bacterium was isolated in the absence of other pathogenic bacteria. Pneumonia was seen more frequently than hepatitis, splenomegaly, or colitis. Pleuropneumonia that was grossly indistinguishable from the pleuropneumonia associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was seen in 29 of 99 swine from which S choleraesuis was the only bacterium isolated.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether administration of inactivated virus or modified-live virus (MLV) vaccines to feral cats at the time of neutering induces protective serum antiviral antibody titers.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—61 feral cats included in a trap-neuter-return program in Florida.

Procedures—Each cat received vaccines against feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline herpes virus (FHV), feline calicivirus (FCV), FeLV, and rabies virus (RV). Immediately on completion of surgery, vaccines that contained inactivated RV and FeLV antigens and either MLV or inactivated FPV, FHV, and FCV antigens were administered. Titers of antiviral antibodies (except those against FeLV) were assessed in serum samples obtained immediately prior to surgery and approximately 10 weeks later.

Results—Prior to vaccination, some of the cats had protective serum antibody titers against FPV (33%), FHV (21%), FCV (64%), and RV (3%). Following vaccination, the overall proportion of cats with protective serum antiviral antibody titers increased (FPV [90%], FHV [56%], FCV [93%], and RV [98%]). With the exception of the FHV vaccine, there were no differences in the proportions of cats protected with inactivated virus versus MLV vaccines.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that exposure to FPV, FHV, and FCV is common among feral cats and that a high proportion of cats are susceptible to RV infection. Feral cats appeared to have an excellent immune response following vaccination at the time of neutering. Incorporation of vaccination into trap-neuter-return programs is likely to protect the health of individual cats and possibly reduce the disease burden in the community.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association