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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe disorders of performance-age bucking bulls.

DESIGN Retrospective case-control study.

ANIMALS 78 bucking (cases) and 236 nonbucking (controls) beef bulls.

PROCEDURES The medical record database of a referral hospital was reviewed to identify beef bulls > 1 year old that were examined for a medical or musculoskeletal disorder between January 1, 2000, and April 1, 2014. Bucking bulls were designated as cases, and nonbucking bulls were designated as controls. For each bull, the signalment, history, physical examination and diagnostic test results, and clinical diagnosis were recorded. The frequency of each disorder was compared between cases and controls.

RESULTS Fifteen of 78 (19%) cases and 132 of 236 (56%) controls had medical disorders; however, the frequency did not differ between the 2 groups for any medical disorder. Musculoskeletal disorders were identified in 55 (70.5%) cases and 109 (46%) controls. Cases were 10.55 times as likely as controls to have horn and sinus disorders. Of the 43 (55%) cases examined because of lameness, the thoracic limb was affected in 19 (44%). Compared with controls, cases were 13.37 and 3.31 times as likely to have a musculoskeletal disorder of the vertebral region and pelvic limb, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated bucking bulls were more likely than nonbucking bulls to develop horn and sinus disorders and musculoskeletal disorders of the vertebral region and pelvic limbs. The limb distribution of lameness for bucking bulls may differ from that for nonbucking bulls.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of age on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of flunixin meglumine following IV and transdermal administration to calves.

ANIMALS 8 healthy weaned Holstein bull calves.

PROCEDURES At 2 months of age, all calves received an injectable solution of flunixin (2.2 mg/kg, IV); then, after a 10-day washout period, calves received a topical formulation of flunixin (3.33 mg/kg, transdermally). Blood samples were collected at predetermined times before and for 48 and 72 hours, respectively, after IV and transdermal administration. At 8 months of age, the experimental protocol was repeated except calves received flunixin by the transdermal route first. Plasma flunixin concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy. For each administration route, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental methods and compared between the 2 ages. Plasma prostaglandin (PG) E2 concentration was determined with an ELISA. The effect of age on the percentage change in PGE2 concentration was assessed with repeated-measures analysis. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of flunixin on PGE2 concentration was determined by nonlinear regression.

RESULTS Following IV administration, the mean half-life, area under the plasma concentration-time curve, and residence time were lower and the mean clearance was higher for calves at 8 months of age than at 2 months of age. Following transdermal administration, the mean maximum plasma drug concentration was lower and the mean absorption time and residence time were higher for calves at 8 months of age than at 2 months of age. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of flunixin on PGE2 concentration at 8 months of age was significantly higher than at 2 months of age. Age was not associated with the percentage change in PGE2 concentration following IV or transdermal flunixin administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In calves, the clearance of flunixin at 2 months of age was slower than that at 8 months of age following IV administration. Flunixin administration to calves may require age-related adjustments to the dose and dosing interval and an extended withdrawal interval.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research