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  • Author or Editor: Joe P. Morgan x
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Summary:

The records of 161 German Shepherd Dogs were divided into groups depending on whether there was a radiographic diagnosis of degenerative disk disease (ddd) involving the lumbosacral disk and lumbosacral transitional vertebral segments (tvs) and whether the dogs had cauda equina syndrome (ces). Statistical analysis of the data suggested an association between tvs and ces and an association between ddd and ces. Establishment of confidence intervals revealed the group without either ddd or tvs indicators differed markedly from the other 3 groups of ces relative to the presence of ddd and tvs. There was some overlap in the confidence intervals, but the proportions of ces were higher when ddd and tvs were both evident. This suggests that the important clinical syndrome of ces is at least partially dependent on tvs, which is probably an inherited condition. Because German Shepherd Dogs have a higher frequency of tvs than dogs of other breeds, this partially explains the higher frequency of ces in this breed. Because tvs are probably familial, we suggest the presence of this lesion should be considered in selection of breeding stock. Although it is believed that ddd is partially dependent on the existence of tvs, it is known that ddd can develop in the absence of tvs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Five radiographic protocols for detecting pulmonary metastases in dogs were compared by analyzing receiver operating characteristic curves for the protocols. Protocols compared were a right lateral view only, a left lateral view only, right lateral and dorso- ventral views, both lateral views, and all 3 views. Three radiologists used each of the protocols to evaluate 99 sets of thoracic radiographs. Fifty-two sets of radiographs were from dogs confirmed histologically to have pulmonary metastases and 47 were from dogs proven at necropsy to be free of pulmonary metastases. Results of the 5 protocols were not statistically different. We concluded that a third view is not necessary when routinely screening dogs with cancer for pulmonary metastases and that the standard 2-view thoracic examination should be adequate. However, in individual cases, a third view may be the determining factor in establishing a radiographic diagnosis and should be obtained if any suspicious areas are seen.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association