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  • Author or Editor: Joanne L. Tuohy x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the outcome of resection of simultaneous discrete bilateral mobile thyroid gland carcinomas (TGCs) in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—15 dogs with resected simultaneous discrete bilateral mobile TGCs.

Procedures—Medical records (from 1994 to 2010) were searched for dogs with the appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Information collected included signalment, clinical signs, diagnostic test results, tumor mobility (mobile tumor identified by movement ≥ 1 cm in all planes during palpation), complications, adjuvant treatments, and outcome.

Results—Mobile, discrete, bilateral TGCs were removed in all dogs. Among the 15 dogs, complete parathyroidectomies were necessary in 9; parathyroid tissue was reimplanted in 4 and preserved in 2. Complications included hemorrhage and laryngeal nerve trauma, but without serious consequences. Thirteen dogs received calcitriol with or without supplemental calcium after surgery. In the immediate postoperative period, hypocalcemia developed and was corrected in 11 dogs. At the end of the study, 7 dogs continued to receive calcitriol with or without supplemental calcium, and 8 dogs required long-term thyroid hormone treatment. Six dogs received adjuvant chemotherapy. Local tumor recurrence or de novo distant metastasis was not detected at each dog's last follow-up examination. Median survival time was 38.3 months. Three dogs were lost to follow-up, 8 survived (4.3 to 77 months after surgery), and 4 died of unrelated causes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with TGCs undergoing bilateral thyroid lobectomies, a successful outcome can be expected, even when parathyroid gland tissue cannot be preserved. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in treatment outcome was not clearly defined.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the relationship between width and depth of surgical margins, amount of edema within and around the tumor, and degree of demarcation between the tumor and surrounding tissues with the clinical outcome following surgical removal of cutaneous mast cell tumors (cMCTs) in dogs.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—100 dogs with 115 resectable cMCTs.

Procedures—Information about the dogs' clinical outcomes following cMCT removal was obtained from primary care veterinarians. Histologic sections of excised tumors were assessed retrospectively for tumor grade and measurement of the narrowest lateral and deep margins of nonneoplastic tissue excised with the tumors; edema within the tumor and surrounding tissues was assessed as minimal, moderate, or severe. Tumors were classified as poorly, moderately, or well demarcated on the basis of the degree of mast cell infiltration into the adjoining connective tissue.

Results—Following tumor excision (with no additional postsurgery treatment), 96 dogs had no local recurrence or metastatic disease for 27 to 31 months; 4 metastatic disease–related deaths (dogs with grade II or III tumors) occurred within 3 to 9 months. Histologically, mean lateral and deep surgical margins around the tumors were 8.9 and 5.3 mm, respectively. No recurrence of tumor or metastatic disease developed following excision with lateral margins ≥ 10 mm and deep margins ≥ 4 mm. Edema and degree of demarcation were not correlated with outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that most grade I and II cMCTs in dogs can be successfully treated by complete surgical removal with margins smaller than those currently recommended.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the outcome in terms of progression-free interval (PFI) and overall survival time (ST) after curative-intent resection of oral melanoma in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—70 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—An electronic medical record search and review was performed for dogs that underwent curative-intent resection of oral melanoma (May 1, 1998, to December 31, 2011). Information gathered included signalment, oral location of tumor, staging results, type of surgery, type of adjuvant therapy, findings on histologic evaluation, and outcome.

Results—36 (51.4%), 16 (22.9%), 13 (18.6%), and 1 (1.4%) of 70 dogs had tumors classified as stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively; tumor stage could not be determined for 4 (5.7%) dogs because of the lack of tumor size information. Fifty-one (72.9%) dogs had tumors completely excised. Twenty-nine (41.4%) dogs received adjuvant therapy. Median PFI and ST were 508 and 723 days, respectively. Thirty-two (45.7%) dogs had disease progression. Significant associations with PFI or ST were found for administration of adjuvant therapy, presence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, higher tumor stage (III or IV), increased tumor size (> 3 cm), and sexually intact female dogs. Administration of adjuvant treatment was associated with a 130% increased hazard (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0 to 5.0) of disease progression; the presence of metastases at the time of diagnosis was associated with a 281% increased hazard (hazard ratio, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5 to 9.6) of death.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that dogs with oral melanoma can have a long PFI and ST after resection with wide margins.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To provide updated information on the distribution of histopathologic types of primary pulmonary neoplasia in dogs and evaluate the effect of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in dogs with pulmonary carcinoma.

ANIMALS

340 dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs that underwent lung lobectomy for removal of a primary pulmonary mass were reviewed, and histopathologic type of lesions was determined. The canine lung carcinoma stage classification system was used to determine clinical stage for dogs with pulmonary carcinoma.

RESULTS

Pulmonary carcinoma was the most frequently encountered tumor type (296/340 [87.1%]), followed by sarcoma (26 [7.6%]), adenoma (11 [3.2%]), and pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor (5 [1.5%]); there was also 1 plasmacytoma and 1 carcinosarcoma. Twenty (5.9%) sarcomas were classified as primary pulmonary histiocytic sarcoma. There was a significant difference in median survival time between dogs with pulmonary carcinomas (399 days), dogs with histiocytic sarcomas (300 days), and dogs with neuroendocrine tumors (498 days). When dogs with pulmonary carcinomas were grouped on the basis of clinical stage, there were no significant differences in median survival time between dogs that did and did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that pulmonary carcinoma is the most common cause of primary pulmonary neoplasia in dogs; however, nonepithelial tumors can occur. Survival times were significantly different between dogs with pulmonary carcinoma, histiocytic sarcoma, and neuroendocrine tumor, emphasizing the importance of recognizing the relative incidence of these various histologic diagnoses. The therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy in dogs with pulmonary carcinoma remains unclear and warrants further investigation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association