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  • Author or Editor: Joann M. Kinyon x
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Abstract

Objective

To investigate the distribution of IgA- and IgG-containing cells and T cells in the villi of duodenal mucosa from healthy dogs and from dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or gastroenteritis.

Design

Case-control study.

Animals

28 dogs, grouped according to clinical and histologic criteria: 11 dogs with IBD, 8 dogs with nonspecific gastroenteritis, and 9 healthy dogs.

Procedure

Endoscopic biopsy specimens of duodenal mucosa from each dog were stained specifically for IgA and IgG heavy chains and pan T-cell (CD3) antigen, using immunoperoxidase techniques. Morphometric analysis, performed via an image-analysis system, was used to count IgA- and IgG-containing cells and T cells within paired contiguous villi from each dog.

Results

T cells were the predominant immune cell type in all groups of dogs. Significant differences in the villus distribution of IgA- and IgG-containing cells and T cells were not observed. Healthy dogs had significantly higher T-cell counts than had dogs with IBD or gastroenteritis. Dogs with nonspecific gastroenteritis had a significantly higher concentration of IgA-containing cells than the other groups of dogs had. Significant group differences for IgG-containing cells also were evident, with dogs with IBD having the lowest cell counts.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

High concentrations of IgA- and IgG-containing cells and T cells in the villus lamina propria cannot be reliably used to distinguish IBD from other intestinal disorders in dogs. Evaluation of T cells may be the most discriminatory method for differentiating dogs with IBD from clinically normal dogs via examination of intestinal biopsy specimens. (Am J Vet Res 1996; 57:697–704)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effectiveness of using a disinfectant mat filled with a peroxygen compound to prevent mechanical transmission of bacteria via contaminated footwear between the food animal ward and common breezeway of a veterinary teaching hospital.

Design—Observational study.

Sample Population—Shoe soles of individuals entering and exiting from the ward.

Procedures—A mat filled with peroxygen disinfectant was placed at the entrance to the food animal ward, and participants wiped each shoe twice on the mat surface (n = 16) or walked on the mat surface but did not wipe their shoes (17) before entering and exiting from the ward. Swab specimens were collected from the shoe soles of participants before and after mat use and submitted for bacterial culture.

Results—For both study days, as participants entered the ward, median number of aerobic bacteria isolated from shoe swab specimens collected prior to use of the disinfectant mat was not significantly different from median number isolated after use of the disinfectant mat. However, as participants exited the ward, median number of aerobic bacteria isolated from shoe swab specimens collected prior to use of the disinfectant mat was significantly higher than median number isolated after use of the disinfectant mat.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that placing a mat filled with a peroxygen disinfectant at the exit from the food animal ward of a veterinary teaching hospital may help reduce mechanical transmission of bacteria on the footwear of individuals leaving the ward.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association