Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jeremy V. Bailey x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective

To compare the effects of different commercial nutrient media and sera on protein synthesis and maintenance of cellular density in cultures of the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT).

Animals

8 healthy 2- to 4-year-old horses.

Procedure

First Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, Ham's F12 nutrient mixture, RPMI 1640 medium, minimum essential medium with Earle's salts, minimum essential medium with Hanks' salts, and a Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/Ham's F12 nutrient mixture with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) were compared. Then FBS, fetal equine serum, and donor horse serum, each at 5, 10, and 15% in RPMI 1640 medium, were compared. Explants were cultured in roller bottles at 37 C and aerated (50% O2/45% N2/5% CO2) daily. Rates of [3H]- proline incorporation were used as a measure of the rates of total protein and collagen synthesis on days 13 and 28. Matrix cellular density of explants at days 14 and 28 was measured by computerized image analysis.

Results

Equine SDFT explants were cultured in all media for up to 4 weeks. Proline incorporation was greatest in Ham's F12 nutrient mixture and in RPMI 1640 medium, with the concentration of proline in medium correlating to the in vitro response. Total proline incorporation was greater in 15% FBS than in 5 or 10% FBS. Other differences among sera were not detected. Matrix cell density in 15% donor horse serum was equivalent to that in uncultured controls and higher than that in most other sera at week 2.

Conclusion

The in vitro SDFT culture system described may be used in future studies to enhance knowledge of the biological and biochemical characteristics of intrinsic tendon healing. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1118–1123)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To determine treatment and outcome of a series of wapiti (elk) with fractures of the limbs.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

22 wapiti.

Procedure

Medical records were reviewed to determine affected limb and bone, fracture configuration, method of treatment, outcome, and complications.

Results

2 animals had fractures of the humerus; 8 had fractures of the radius, ulna, or both; 5 had fractures of the third metacarpal bone; 3 had fractures of the tibia; 2 had fractures of the femur; and 2 had fractures of the tarsal bones. Most fractures (n = 11) were closed, displaced, nonarticular fractures; 6 fractures were open. Four animals died or were euthanatized prior to fracture treatment, 2 were not treated because fractures had already healed, and 14 underwent fracture repair. In the remaining 2 animals, the affected limb was amputated. Five animals developed nonfatal complications (wound dehiscence, osteomyelitis [2 animals], delayed union, and malunion) and 2 developed fatal complications (gastrocnemius rupture and femoral fracture during recovery). Overall, 16 animals were discharged from the hospital, and all were doing well at follow-up, 2 months to 4 years after discharge.

Clinical Implications

In wapiti, limb fractures can be successfully treated by means of internal or external fixation. The high rate of fracture healing, even among wapiti with open fractures, should encourage veterinarians to repair limb fractures in wapiti. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:1829-1832)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To examine the amount of heat generated in equine cortical bone by a 6.2-mm drill, using low- and high-speed and controlled feed rate drilling.

Sample Population

10 metacarpal bones harvested from five 2-year-old draft-type horses.

Procedure

Drilling on metacarpal bones was done using a machine shop mill with which the feed rate and drill speed could be precisely controlled. Bones were drilled, using 6 combinations of feed rate (1, 2, and 3 mm advance/s) and drill speed (317 and 1,242 revolutions/min [rpm], with maximal temperatures recorded by thermocouples placed 1, 1.5, and 2 mm from the drill. Maximal temperatures were evaluated for the effect of feed rate, drill speed, cortical thickness, and distance from the drill, using linear regression analysis.

Results

Increasing feed rate from 1 to 2 and from 2 to 3 mm/s significantly decreased mean maximal temperature. Increasing drill speed from 317 to 1242 rpm significantly increased mean maximal temperature. Increasing cortical thickness significantly increased mean maximal temperature, and increasing the distance from the drill hole significantly decreased mean maximal temperatures.

Conclusions

On the basis of our results, we recommend using low drill speeds while applying sufficient axial force to advance the drill as rapidly as possible through the bone.

Clinical Relevance

Results of using this in vitro model suggest that temperatures at the drill-bone interface may be sufficiently high to result in significant thermal necrosis when drilling equine cortical bone. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:942–944)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research