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  • Author or Editor: Jeongwoo Choi x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate a contrast medium that could be used for radiographic and ultrasonographic assessment of the small intestine in dogs.

ANIMALS

8 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC; 0.5% solution) was combined with iohexol (300 mg of iodine/mL) to yield modified contrast medium (MCM). Dogs were orally administered the first of 3 MCMs (10 mL/kg [9.5 mL of CMC/kg plus 0.5 mL of iohexol/kg]). Radiographic and ultrasonographic assessment of the small intestine followed 10 minutes after administration and every 10 minutes thereafter, until MCM was seen within the ascending colon. Minimally, 1 week elapsed between dosing of subsequent MCMs (10 mL/kg [9 mL of CMC/kg plus 1 mL of iohexol/kg and 8.5 mL of CMC/kg plus 1.5 mL of iohexol/kg]) and repeated radiography and ultrasonography.

RESULTS

Radiographic contrast enhancement of the small intestine was best with MCM that combined 8.5 mL of CMC/kg and 1.5 mL of iohexol/kg. Mean small intestinal transit time for all MCMs was 86 minutes. All MCMs did not interfere with ultrasonographic assessment of the small intestine and may have improved visualization of the far-field small intestinal walls.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

An MCM that combined 8.5 mL of 0.5% CMC/kg and 1.5 mL of iohexol/kg could be an alternative to barium or iohexol alone for contrast small intestinal radiography in dogs, especially when abdominal ultrasonography is to follow contrast radiography.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate stiffness of the liver parenchyma in healthy adult cats by means of point shear wave elastography (PSWE).

ANIMALS

18 client-owned adult (1- to 6-year-old) healthy cats.

PROCEDURES

Echogenicity and echotexture of the liver parenchyma were assessed by means of conventional B-mode ultrasonography. The shear wave velocity (Vs) of the right and left portions of the liver were measured by means of PSWE.

RESULTS

B-mode ultrasonography revealed no abnormalities in echotexture or echogenicity of the liver parenchyma in any cat. Mean (95% CI) Vs in the liver parenchyma was 1.46 m/s (1.36 to 1.55 m/s) for the right portion, 1.36 m/s (1.26 to 1.47 m/s) for the left portion, and 1.43 m/s (1.35 to 1.51 m/s) overall. The difference in mean Vs between the 2 portions of the liver was significant. No significant correlation was found between Vs and body weight or between Vs and the depth at which this variable was measured.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Quantitative PSWE of the liver was feasible in healthy adult cats. The obtained values for Vs may be useful for interpretation of and comparison with values measured in cats with liver disease. Additional research is needed to explore the potential usefulness of PSWE for diagnostic purposes.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the change in the lumbosacral angle (ΔLSA) and conus medullaris (CM) displacement in healthy dogs undergoing dynamic MRI with changes in the posture of their pelvic limbs from neutral posture to flexion or extension posture and to evaluate for potential correlation between ΔLSA and CM displacement.

ANIMALS

9 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Dogs underwent dynamic MRI with their pelvic limbs positioned in neutral, flexion, and extension postures. From T2-weighted sagittal midline plane MRI images, 2 observers measured the lumbosacral angle and CM location in duplicate for each posture for each dog. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed, and the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (ρ) was used to assess for potential correlation between ΔLSA and CM displacement for changes in pelvic limb posture from neutral to flexion or extension.

RESULTS

Overall, the mean ΔLSA and CM displacement for changes in posture were 23° and 9.09 mm (caudal displacement) for the change from neutral to flexion posture, 8.4° and −2.5 mm (cranial displacement) for the change from neutral to extension posture, and 32.2° and 11.64 mm (caudal displacement) for the change from extension to flexion posture. The ΔLSA strongly correlated (ρ = 0.705; 95% CI, 0.434 to 0.859) with displacement of the CM.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The use of dynamic MRI, compared with conventional MRI, will better help to characterize clinically normal and abnormal features of the lumbosacral region of the vertebral column and associated spinal cord during postural changes. Further, when limited translocation of the CM is evident on dynamic MRI, veterinarians should suspect underlying lumbosacral pathophysiologic processes or anatomic abnormalities.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research