Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jens Raila x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine plasma and urine concentrations of retinol, retinyl esters, retinol-binding protein (RBP), and Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) in dogs with chronic renal disease (CRD).

Animals—17 dogs with naturally developing CRD and 21 healthy control dogs.

Procedure—A diagnosis of CRD was established on the basis of clinical signs, plasma concentrations of creatinine and urea, and results of urinalysis. Concentrations of retinol and retinyl esters were measured by use of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Concentrations of RBP and THP were measured by use of sensitive ELISA systems.

Results—Dogs with CRD had higher plasma concentrations of retinol, which were not paralleled by differences in plasma concentrations of RBP. Calculated ratio of urinary total vitamin A (sum of concentrations of retinol and retinyl esters to creatinine concentration) and ratio of the concentration of urinary retinyl esters to creatinine concentration did not differ between groups. However, we detected a significantly higher retinol-to-creatinine ratio in the urine of dogs with CRD, which was paralleled by a higher urinary RBP-to-creatinine ratio. Thus, in dogs with CRD, the estimated fractional clearance of total vitamin A, retinol, and RBP was increased. Furthermore, dogs with CRD had a reduced urinary THP-to-creatinine ratio.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study documented that CRD affects the concentrations of retinol in plasma and urine of dogs. Analysis of the data indicates that measurement of urinary RBP and urinary THP concentrations provides valuable information that can be helpful in follow-up monitoring of dogs with CRD. (Am J Vet Res 2003:64:874–879)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate excretion of urinary albumin (UAlb) and urinary retinol-binding protein (URBP) in dogs with naturally occurring renal disease.

Animals—64 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were assigned to groups according to plasma creatinine concentration, urinary protein-to-urinary creatinine ratio (UP:UC), and exogenous plasma creatinine clearance (P-ClCr) rates: group A (n = 8), nonazotemic (plasma creatinine < 125 μmol/L) and nonproteinuric (UP:UC < 0.2) with P-ClCr rate > 90 mL/min/m2; group B (26), nonazotemic and nonproteinuric with P-ClCr rate 50 to 89 mL/min/m2; group C (7), nonazotemic but proteinuric with P-ClCr rate 53 to 98 mL/min/m2; group D (8), azotemic and borderline proteinuric with P-ClCr rate 22 to 45 mL/min/m2); and group E (15), azotemic and proteinuric (P-ClCr not evaluated). The UAlb and URBP concentrations were measured via ELISA; UAlb-to-urinary creatinine (UAlb:UC) and URBP-to-urinary creatinine (URBP:UC) ratios were determined.

Results—UAlb:UC and URBP:UC did not differ between groups A and B. Increased UAlb: UCs and URBP:UCs were paralleled by increased UP:UCs in groups C, D, and E relative to values from groups A and B, independent of azotemia. There were significant positive correlations of UP:UC with UAlb:UC and of UAlb:UC with URBP:UC (r = 0.82 and 0.46, respectively). However, UP:UC, UAlb:UC, and URBP:UC were not significantly correlated with P-ClCr rate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—UAlb and URBP concentrations were paralleled by urinary protein concentrations and may be useful in assessing renal management of plasma proteins. Determination of urinary protein, UAlb, or URBP concentration was not sufficiently sensitive to detect reduced P-ClCr in nonazotemic dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1387—1394)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations in canine blood products treated with or without a leukoreduction filter.

Sample—10 canine blood donors.

Procedures—Dogs underwent blood collection. Five of 10 units were leukoreduced prior to separation into packed RBCs and fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Concentrations of VEGF were measured by ELISA in plasma supernatants from aliquots of packed RBCs obtained immediately after separation and on days 7, 14, and 21 of storage. Fresh frozen plasma samples of 2 filtered and 2 nonfiltered units were examined after storage.

Results—RBC counts in whole blood before and after leukoreduction did not differ significantly, but WBCs and platelets were removed effectively. The VEGF concentration was lower than the detection limit (9 pg/mL) in 9 of 10 plasma samples and in all packed RBC and FFP units immediately after separation. The median VEGF concentrations in 5 nonfiltered packed RBC units were 37, 164, and 110 pg/mL on days 7, 14, and 21 of storage, respectively. In 5 filtered packed RBC and all FFP units, VEGF concentrations remained lower than the detection limit.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Leukoreduction filters were effective in preventing the release of VEGF during storage of canine RBC products.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To use proteomic analysis to determine the protein constituents of synovial fluid samples from the stifle joints of dogs with and without osteoarthritis secondary to cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR).

ANIMALS 12 dogs with clinically normal stifle joints (controls) and 16 dogs with osteoarthritis secondary to CCLR.

PROCEDURES A synovial fluid sample was obtained from all dogs. Synovial fluid total protein concentration was determined by the Bradford assay. Proteins were separated by use of a 1-D SDS-PAGE to detect protein bands that differed between dogs with and without osteoarthritis. Those protein bands then underwent trypsin digestion and were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the results of which were compared with a curated protein sequence database for protein identification. One of the most frequently identified proteins, apoprotein (apo) A-I, was then quantified in all synovial fluid samples by use of a competitive-inhibition ELISA. Results were compared between dogs with and without osteoarthritis.

RESULTS Median synovial fluid total protein and apo A-I concentrations for dogs with osteoarthritis were significantly greater than those for control dogs. The most abundant proteins identified in the synovial fluid were albumin and apo A-I.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that quantification of synovial fluid total protein and apo A-I concentrations might facilitate diagnosis of osteoarthritis secondary to CCLR in dogs. Further research and validation of synovial fluid apo A-I concentration as a biomarker for osteoarthritis in dogs are necessary before it can be recommended for clinical use.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research