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  • Author or Editor: Jennifer L. Demko x
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Abstract

Objective—To identify the most common etiologic diagnosis and any historical, physical, or other diagnostic variables associated with a definitive etiologic diagnosis for chronic nasal discharge in cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—75 cats with nasal discharge of ≥ 1 month's duration.

Procedures—Medical records of affected cats were reviewed for information on signalment, clinical signs, duration and type of nasal discharge, results of clinical examination, laboratory findings, and advanced imaging findings.

Results—A specific etiologic diagnosis for nasal discharge was identified in only 36% of cats. Neoplasia (carcinoma or lymphoma) was the most common etiologic diagnosis. Character and location of nasal discharge did not contribute greatly toward a specific etiologic diagnosis. Sneezing and vomiting were the most common concurrent clinical signs. Routine CBC, serum biochemical panel, and urinalysis did not contribute to a specific etiologic diagnosis. An etiologic diagnosis was more likely in older cats and cats that underwent advanced imaging studies and nasal biopsy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although advanced diagnostic testing, including imaging studies and biopsy, increases the likelihood of achieving an etiologic diagnosis, the cause of chronic nasal discharge in cats often remains elusive.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of open toggle rod stabilization in dogs with luxation of the hip joint.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—62 dogs.

Procedures—Information on signalment, surgical procedure, and postoperative care was obtained from the medical records. A questionnaire was sent to all owners to solicit follow-up information.

Results—The distribution for time between luxation and surgery was bimodal, with 24 (39%) dogs examined ≤ 2 days after injury and 23 (37%) examined > 7 days after injury. Postoperative complications developed in 16 of the 62 (26%) dogs, with complications developing within 1 week after surgery in 10 of the 16. The most common complication was reluxation, which occurred in 7 dogs. Dogs in which surgery time was < 2 hours were significantly less likely to have a reluxation (2/40 [5%]) than were dogs in which surgery time was ≥ 2 hours (5/22 [23%]). When asked to rate current limb function (0 = no lameness and 5 = non–weightbearing lame) a minimum of 6 months after surgery, 23 of 27 (85%) owners indicated a score of 0 or 1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of the present study suggest that toggle rod stabilization is an effective treatment for hip joint luxation in dogs. However, complications, particularly reluxation, were common.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association