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  • Author or Editor: Jeffrey Lakritz x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of erythromycin and related compounds after intragastric administration of erythromycin phosphate and erythromycin estolate to healthy foals.

Animals—11 healthy 2- to 6-month-old foals.

Procedure—Food was withheld from foals overnight before intragastric administration of erythromycin estolate (25 mg/kg of body weight; n = 8) and erythromycin phosphate (25 mg/kg; 7). Four foals received both drugs with 2 weeks between treatments. Plasma erythromycin concentrations were determined at various times after drug administration by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. Maximum plasma peak concentrations, time to maximum concentrations, area under plasma concentration versus time curves, half-life of elimination, and mean residence times were determined from concentration versus time curves.

Results—Maximum peak concentration of erythromycin A after administration of erythromycin phosphate was significantly greater than after administration of erythromycin estolate (2.9 ± 1.1 µg/ml vs 1.0 ± 0.82 µg/ml). Time to maximum concentration was shorter after administration of erythromycin phosphate than after erythromycin estolate (0.71 ± 0.29 hours vs 1.7 ± 1.2 hours). Concentrations of anhydroerythromycin A were significantly less 1 and 3 hours after administration of erythromycin estolate than after administration of erythromycin phosphate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Plasma concentrations of erythromycin A remained > 0.25 µg/ml (reported minimum inhibitory concentration for Rhodococcus equi) for at least 4 hours after intragastric administration of erythromycin phosphate or erythromycin estolate, suggesting that the recommended dosage for either formulation (25 mg/kg, q 6 h) should be adequate for treatment of R equi infections in foals. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:914–919)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of prior feeding on pharmacokinetics and estimated bioavailability of orally administered microencapsulated erythromycin base (MEB) in healthy foals.

Animals—6 healthy foals, 3 to 5 months old.

Procedure—Foals were given 2 doses of MEB (25 mg/kg of body weight, PO). One dose was administered after food was withheld overnight, and the other was administered after foals had consumed hay. The study used a crossover design with a 2-week period between doses. Blood was collected via a jugular vein prior to and at specific times after drug administration. Concentrations of erythromycin A and anhydroerythromycin A in plasma were determined, using highperformance liquid chromatography. Results pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma concentration-time data for food-withheld and fed conditions were compared.

Results—Plasma concentrations of erythromycin A for foals were lower after feeding than concentrations when food was withheld. Area under the plasma concentration- time curve, maximum plasma concentration, and estimated bioavailability were greater in foals when food was withheld than when foals were fed. Anhydroerythromycin A was detected in plasma after administration of MEB in all foals.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Foals should be given MEB before they are fed hay. Administration of MEB to foals from which food was withheld overnight apparently provides plasma concentrations of erythromycin A that exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration of Rhodococcus equi for approximately 5 hours. The dosage of 25 mg/kg every 8 hours, PO, appears appropriate. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1011–1015)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of lactoferrin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proliferation of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), gene expression of inflammatory mediators, and production of prostanoids in vitro.

Sample Population—PBMCs isolated from 15 Holstein bull calves.

Procedures—Mixed populations of PBMCs were isolated by differential centrifugation. Proliferation assays were conducted in 96-well plates designed to allow addition of lactoferrin (200 ng/mL) with and without LPS (1 μg/mL) in a checkerboard design. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine was used to determine proliferation of PBMCs. Prostaglandin E2 production was determined in culture-conditioned medium by use of enzyme immunoassay. Effects of lactoferrin on LPS-induced gene expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 were monitored by use of PCR assays.

Results—Lactoferrin supplementation significantly reduced LPS-induced incorporation of 3H-thymidine and production of prostaglandin E2 by PBMCs. Lactoferrin reduced LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and MMP-9 mRNA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lactoferrin reduced LPS-induced cellular proliferation, inflammatory mediator gene expression, and prostaglandin E2 production by bovine PBMCs in vitro. These effects may be beneficial in reducing the impact of endotoxemia in neonates.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure the effects of lowmolecular-weight inhibitors on the activity of bovine neutrophil matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9).

Sample Population—Bovine MMP-9 purified from bovine neutrophilconditioned medium.

Procedures—Neutrophils were degranulated by stimulation with phorbol ester. Enzyme purification was performed by use of gelatin affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. Activated enzyme was incubated with inhibitors prior to addition of substrate (gelatin fluorescein conjugate or fluorogenic peptide). Rates of enzymatic cleavage were determined by monitoring fluorescence as the reactions progressed. Values of IC50 (molar concentration of compound that inhibits specific activity by 50%) and KI (in vitro inhibition constant) were determined.

Results—Rates of enzymatic activity of monomeric and dimeric bovine MMP-9 measured by use of gelatin and peptide substrates were linear with respect to time and concentrations of enzyme and substrate. The MMP-9 was potently inhibited by hydroxamic acids (IC50 for gelatin, 29.2 to 55.7nM; IC50 for peptide, 4.8 to 24.6nM; KI, 0.2 to 0.5nM), whereas tetracyclines (IC50 for gelatin, 30.1 to 112.7MM; IC50 for peptide, 48.0 to 123.8MM; KI, 25.2 to 61.4µM) and chlorhexidine (IC50 for gelatin, 139.1MM; IC50 for peptide, 672.5MM to 1.7mM; KI, 495.0 to 663.0MM) had limited inhibition. Gelatinase-specific inhibitor SB-3CT had intermediate potency (IC50 for peptide, 185.0 to 290.0nM; KI, 66.5 to 86.0nM).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bovine MMP-9 was potently inhibited by hydroxamic acids and gelatinase inhibitor. These compounds may be useful as modulators of neutrophil-mediated protease activity in cattle.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize and purify covalent complexes of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and haptoglobin released by bovine granulocytes in vitro.

Sample Population—Blood samples obtained from healthy cows and cows with acute and chronic inflammation to obtain WBCs and sera.

Procedures—WBCs were isolated by differential centrifugation, hypotonic lysis of RBCs, and degranulated by stimulation with phorbol ester (20 ng/mL). Cell-conditioned medium was subjected to affinity and gel chromatography and purified proteins subjected to SDS- PAGE gelatin zymography, western blot analysis, Coomassie blue staining, and peptide mass spectrometry for protein identification. Sera of cows hospitalized for acute and chronic septic conditions and of clinically normal cows were analyzed with similar methods.

Results—Matrix metalloproteinase-9 was released from neutrophils in vitro and migrated to a molecular mass of approximately 220 kd (prodimer), approximately 105 kd (promonomer), and > 220 kd (high–molecular mass complexes). These high–molecular mass complexes were composed of α- and β-haptoglobin and MMP-9 (ratio13:13:1). Complexes of MMP-9 and haptoglobin had biochemical properties of both its protein constituents (ie, enzymatic activity toward gelatin and hemoglobin binding). Complexes of MMP-9 and haptoglobin were also detected in sera of cows with acute inflammation, but not in clinically normal cows or cows with chronic disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A fraction of neutrophil MMP-9 is released in complex with haptoglobin. The complex is present in granules and retains biological activity of its components. Detection of the complex in serum may provide an indicator of acute inflammation.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetic disposition of IV administered caffeine in healthy Lama spp camelids.

Animals—4 adult male alpacas and 4 adult female llamas.

Procedures—Caffeine (3 mg/kg) was administered as an IV bolus. Plasma caffeine concentrations were determined by use of high-performance liquid chromatography in 6 animals and by use of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in 2 llamas.

Results—Median elimination half-life was 11 hours (range, 9.3 to 29.8 hours) in alpacas and 16 hours (range, 5.4 to 17 hours) in llamas. The volume of distribution at steady state was 0.60 L/kg (range, 0.45 to 0.93 L/kg) in alpacas and 0.75 L/kg (range, 0.68 to 1.15 L/kg) in llamas. Total plasma clearance was 44 mL/h/kg (range, 24 to 56 mL/h/kg) in alpacas and 42 mL/h/kg (range, 30 to 109 mL/h/kg) in llamas.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were suitable methods for determination of plasma caffeine concentrations in alpacas and llamas. Plasma caffeine concentration-time curves were best described by a 2-compartment model. Elimination half-lives, plasma clearance, volume of distribution at steady state, and mean residence time were not significantly different between alpacas and llamas. Intravenous administration of caffeine at a dose of 3 mg/kg did not induce clinical signs of excitement.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize gelatinases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and gelatinases produced by alveolar macrophages of healthy calves.

Sample Population—Samples of BALF and alveolar macrophages obtained from 20 healthy 2-month-old calves.

Procedure—BALF was examined by use of gelatin zymography and immunoblotting to detect gelatinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2. Cultured alveolar macrophages were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and conditioned medium was subjected to zymography. Alveolar macrophage RNA was used for reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction assay of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase.

Results—Gelatinolytic activity in BALF was evident at 92 kd (14/20 calves; latent MMP-9) and 72 kd (18/20; latent MMP-2). Gelatinolytic activity was evident at 82 kd (10/20 calves; active MMP-9) and 62 kd (17/20; active MMP-2). Gelatinases were inhibited by metal chelators but not serine protease inhibitors. Immunoblotting of BALF protein and conditioned medium confirmed the MMP-2 and -9 proteins. Endogenous inhibitors (ie, TIMPs) were detected in BALF from all calves (TIMP-1) or BALF from only 4 calves (TIMP-2). Cultured alveolar macrophages expressed detectable amounts of MMP-9 mRNA but not MMP-2 mRNA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Healthy calves have detectable amounts of the gelatinases MMP-2 and -9 in BALF. Endogenous inhibitors of MMPs were detected in BALF (ie, TIMP-1, all calves; TIMP-2, 4 calves). Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated alveolar macrophages express MMP-9 but not MMP-2 mRNA. The role of proteases in the pathogenesis of lung injury associated with pneumonia has yet to be determined. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:163–172)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare quantitative densitometric computed tomography (CT), morphometric, and histologic data of normal lungs in dogs with similar parameters obtained after induction of an acute inflammatory response and determine whether CT densitometry correlated with histopathologic changes.

Animals—6 healthy adult dogs.

Procedure—After initial CT, 1 mL of 0.1M hydrochloric acid (HCl) and 3 mL of autologous blood were instilled into the right middle (RM) and caudal segment of the left cranial (LCCd) lung lobes, respectively. Immediately and 24 hours after instillation, CT was repeated. At 24 hours, dogs were euthanatized and lungs were fixed and sampled for morphometric and histologic evaluation. The CT data were compared with lung morphology and morphometry by use of unpaired t tests. Comparison with lungs from control dogs was performed using Spearman rank correlation coefficients.

Results—Mean Hounsfield units (HU) from control and baseline HU from experimental dogs were identical. Immediately after instillation of HCl or blood, there was increased attenuation in both lobes. Autologous blood initially induced severe changes that almost completely resolved at 24 hours; HCl induced severe changes at 24 hours. Significant increases in percentage of parenchymal airspace and alveolar diameter resulted in decreased surface area-to-volume ratio in lobes receiving HCl. Histologic scores were significantly higher in the RM lobe, compared with controls.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Computed tomography attenuation correlated well with histomorphometry and histologic findings in this model. Lung lesions after autologous blood were transient and of limited severity. Lesions induced by HCl were severe; alterations in morphometric and histologic parameters were reflected in CT attenuation measurements. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1114–1123)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe concentration-over-time data for ampicillin and sulbactam in the digital and systemic circulations and synovial fluid (SYN) of cattle following a single injection of ampicillin-sulbactam as a regional IV perfusion (RIVP).

ANIMALS 6 healthy adult nonlactating Jersey-crossbred cows.

PROCEDURES The right hind limb of each cow was aseptically prepared. A tourniquet was applied around the midmetatarsal region, and 1.0 g of ampicillin with 0.5 g of sulbactam in a combined formulation was administered as an RIVP into the dorsal common digital vein (DCDV). Blood samples from the DCDV and jugular vein and SYN samples from the metatarsophalangeal joint of the prepared limb were collected immediately before and at predetermined times for 24 hours after RIVP. One blood sample was obtained from the abaxial proper plantar vein of the lateral digit of the prepared limb 0.25 hours after RIVP. Serum and SYN ampicillin and sulbactam concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS Mean ± SD maximum concentration of ampicillin in SYN and serum obtained from the abaxial proper plantar and jugular veins was 1,995 ± 1,011 μg/mL, 5,422 ± 1,953 μg/mL, and 2.5 ± 1.6 μg/mL, respectively. Corresponding serum and SYN concentrations of sulbactam were lower but followed the same pattern over time as those for ampicillin. Synovial fluid ampicillin concentration remained above 8 μg/mL for a mean time of 18.9 hours.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Potentially therapeutic concentrations of ampicillin were achieved in regional serum and SYN samples; SYN concentrations remained at potentially therapeutic values for > 12 hours following RIVP of 1.5 g of ampicillin-sulbactam in the hind limb of healthy cows.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of buprenorphine after IV and SC administration and of sustained-release (SR) buprenorphine after SC administration to adult alpacas.

ANIMALS 6 alpacas.

PROCEDURES Buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg, IV and SC) and SR buprenorphine (0.12 mg/kg, SC) were administered to each alpaca, with a 14-day washout period between administrations. Twenty-one venous blood samples were collected over 96 hours and used to determine plasma concentrations of buprenorphine. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by use of noncompartmental analysis. Pharmacodynamic parameters were assessed via sedation, heart and respiratory rates, and thermal and mechanical antinociception indices.

RESULTS Mean ± SD maximum concentration after IV and SC administration of buprenorphine were 11.60 ± 4.50 ng/mL and 1.95 ± 0.80 ng/mL, respectively. Mean clearance was 3.00 ± 0.33 L/h/kg, and steady-state volume of distribution after IV administration was 3.8 ± l.0 L/kg. Terminal elimination half-life was 1.0 ± 0.2 hours and 2.7 ± 2.8 hours after IV and SC administration, respectively. Mean residence time was 1.3 ± 0.3 hours and 3.6 ± 3.7 hours after IV and SC administration, respectively. Bioavailability was 64 ± 28%. Plasma concentrations after SC administration of SR buprenorphine were below the LLOQ in samples from 4 alpacas. There were no significant changes in pharmacodynamic parameters after buprenorphine administration. Alpacas exhibited mild behavioral changes after all treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Buprenorphine administration to healthy alpacas resulted in moderate bioavailability, rapid clearance, and a short half-life. Plasma concentrations were detectable in only 2 alpacas after SC administration of SR buprenorphine.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research