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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 6-year-old spayed female Golden Retriever was evaluated for a 2-week history of progressive hyporexia, signs of abdominal pain, and weight loss.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination findings included mild signs of pain on palpation of the cranial part of the abdomen and a body condition score of 4 (scale, 1 to 9). A CBC revealed mild microcytosis and hypochromasia; results of serum biochemical analysis were within the respective reference ranges, and abdominal ultrasonography revealed no abnormalities. Capsule endoscopy was performed, and numerous gastric erosions and hemorrhages were detected, with rare dilated lacteals in the proximal aspect of the small intestine.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Treatment was initiated with omeprazole and sucralfate for 6 weeks, and the dog was transitioned to a novel protein diet. Capsule endoscopy was repeated at the end of the initial treatment course and revealed overall improvement, with a few small erosions remaining; medical treatment was continued for an additional 2 weeks. At last follow-up 9 months after treatment ended, the dog was clinically normal.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Capsule endoscopy was useful for initial detection and subsequent reevaluation of gastrointestinal lesions in this patient without a need for sedation or anesthesia. Information obtained in the follow-up evaluation was valuable in identifying a need to extend the duration of medical treatment.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—Two adult male castrated cats were evaluated because of a history of constipation, tenesmus, or intermittent vomiting.

Clinical Findings—Radiography and ultrasonography revealed luminal narrowing in the colon of 1 cat and a colonic mass in the other. A histopathologic diagnosis of colonic adenocarcinoma was made in both cats.

Treatment and Outcome—Under fluoroscopic guidance, a self-expanding metallic stent was advanced over a wire and across the area of colonic stenosis and deployed. One cat had progressive weight loss but maintained a normal appetite, energy, and a high quality of life. Fecal continence was maintained, and tenesmus was rarely observed. The cat was euthanized because of tumor metastasis 274 days after the colonic stent was placed. The other cat retained fecal continence, and the owners reported subjective improvement in the severity of tenesmus, compared with that prior to stent placement. The cat was euthanized 19 days after stent placement because of perceived decreased quality of life.

Clinical Relevance—The use of self-expanding metallic stents for alleviation of colonic obstruction secondary to adenocarcinoma in cats appears to be effective. This technique provides a simple, quick, nonsurgical option for palliation in cats with advanced metastatic or systemic disease in which surgical resection may not be possible or warranted.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate short- and long-term outcome following endovascular treatment of intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—100 dogs.

Procedures—All patients had angiographic evaluation with or without endovascular shunt attenuation. The medical records were reviewed for pertinent data, complications, outcome, and survival time.

Results—95 dogs with congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunts received 111 procedures (83% [79/95] had 1 treatment, and 17% [16/95] had > 1 treatment; 5 dogs had no treatment because of excessive portal venous pressure–central venous pressure gradients). Angiography identified 38 right, 33 left, and 19 central divisional single shunts (n = 90) and 10 complex or multiple shunts. Partial shunt attenuation was performed in 92 dogs by means of caval stent placement and insertion of thrombogenic coils within the shunt, and 3 had complete acute shunt occlusion. Major intraoperative complications (3/111 [3%]) included temporary severe portal hypertension in 2 dogs and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in 1 dog. Major postoperative (< 1 week after surgery) complications (14/111 [13%]) included seizures or hepatoencephalopathy (7/111 [6%]), cardiac arrest (2/111 [2%]), jugular site bleeding (2/111 [2%]), pneumonia (1/111 [1%]), suspected portal hypertension (1/111 [1%]), and acute death (1/111 [1%]). Median follow-up time was 958 days (range, 0 to 3,411 days). Median survival time for treated dogs was 2,204 days (range, 0 to 3,411 days). Outcome was considered excellent (57/86 [66%]) or fair (13/86 [15%]) in 70 of 86 (81%) treated dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that endovascular treatment of intrahepatic shunts in dogs may result in lower morbidity and mortality rates, with similar success rates, compared with previously reported outcomes for open surgical procedures. Gastrointestinal ulceration was a common finding among this population of dogs, and lifelong gastroprotectant medications are now recommended.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—3 dogs were examined because of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), which is an obstruction of venous blood flow located between the liver and the junction of the caudal vena cava and right atrium. Two dogs had confirmed neoplastic obstructions, and the other dog had a suspected neoplastic obstruction of the hepatic veins and caudal vena cava.

Clinical Findings—All dogs had similar clinical signs of weight gain, lethargy, and ascites that did not respond to medical treatments, and 2 dogs had pitting edema of the hind limbs. Ultrasonography revealed a presumptive venous obstruction, which was confirmed by use of computed tomography.

Treatment and Outcome—Each dog was anesthetized. By use of fluoroscopic guidance, endovascular stents were placed within the left hepatic vein and caudal vena cava in 2 dogs, and a single stent was placed within the left hepatic vein extending into the caudal vena cava of the third dog. After stent placement, venous pressure in the left hepatic vein decreased. Resolution of clinical signs was dramatic in all 3 dogs (survival time ranged from 7 to 20 months), with only mild complications in 1 dog.

Clinical Relevance—Endovascular stents may be an appropriate palliative treatment for dogs with clinical signs attributable to BCS.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop and determine the feasibility of a novel minimally invasive technique for percutaneous catheterization and embolization of the thoracic duct (PCETD) in dogs and to determine thoricic duct TD pressure at rest and during short-term balloon occlusion of the cranial vena cava (CrVC).

Animals—Fifteen 7- to 11-month-old healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Efferent intestinal lymphangiography was performed, and the cisterna chyli was punctured with a trochar needle percutaneously under fluoroscopic guidance. When access was successful, a guide wire was directed into the TD through the needle and a vascular access sheath was advanced over the guide wire. Thoracic duct pressure was measured at rest and during acute balloon occlusion of the CrVC. The TD was then embolized cranial to the diaphragm with a combination of microcoils and cyanoacrylate or ethylene vinyl alcohol.

Results—Successful puncture of the cisterna chyli with advancement of a wire into the TD was possible in 9 of 15 dogs, but successful catheterization was possible in only 5 of 9 dogs. Acute balloon occlusion of the CrVC led to a substantial TD pressure increase in 4 of 4 dogs, and embolization of the TD was successful in 4 of 4 dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—PCETD can successfully be performed in healthy dogs; however, this minimally invasive technique cannot currently be recommended for routine treatment of chylothorax, in part because of the technically demanding nature of the procedure. An increase in jugular venous pressure led to an increase in TD pressure, potentially predisposing some dogs to developing chylothorax.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 16-year-old 6.8-kg (15-lb) castrated male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated because of a 3 × 6-cm mass in the right medial lobe of the liver.

Clinical Findings—The cat had a history of frequent vomiting and anorexia along with 10% weight loss over the past year.

Treatment and Outcome—Transcatheter arterial embolization was selected because surgery (standard first-line treatment) was declined and only 1 vessel feeding the tumor was apparent on contrast-enhanced CT. A 4F sheath was placed in the left carotid artery, and a 3.3F guide catheter was advanced into the celiac artery. A 0.014-inch guidewire and 1.7F microcatheter were inserted into the hepatic artery through the guiding catheter and advanced into the feeding vessel. A mixture of polyvinyl alcohol particles and contrast agent was injected for embolization. A hypoechoic area in the tumor was identified on ultrasonography on posttreatment day 6, and necrotic and degenerated cells in the area were identified cytologically. By posttreatment day 71, vomiting had resolved and CT revealed decreased tumor size, but altered attenuation suggested a more solid mass on day 205. No feeding vessel for embolization was found on contrast-enhanced CT, so ultrasonic emulsification to remove the tumor was performed on day 231. No recurrence was seen on contrast-enhanced CT on day 420 or day 721.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that transcatheter arterial embolization may be suitable for treating hepatic tumors in cats, but alternative approaches are needed in cats, compared with dogs, owing to anatomic differences.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association