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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The protective effects of immunization with the rough (R) mutant, Escherichia coli (J5), were evaluated in an experimental model of Edwardsiella ictaluri-induced enteric septicemia of catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Groups of 18 to 25 fish were administered killed E coli (J5) with or without an aluminum hydroxide (alum) adjuvant by intraperitoneal (ip) or IM route. Vaccinated fish were experimentally infected with virulent Ed ictaluri. Fish were monitored to determine survival after Ed ictaluri infection. Fish that received E coli (J5) in alum IP had enhanced survival (92%), compared with fish given E coli (J5) IP only (54%, P < 0.05) or fish given saline solution IP (56%, P <0.05). Fish given E coli (J5) in alum IM had intermediate survival (77%), which did not differ significantly (P> 0.05) from survival of fish in the other 3 vaccination groups. Serologic responses to Ed ictaluri and E coli (J5) before and after immunization with Ecoli (J5) were determined, using whole-cell elisa. Serologic recognition of both whole cell antigens increased significantly (P< 0.10) in all groups; however, the most pronounced increase was observed in fish that received Ecoli (J5) in alum IP. These results indicate the IP administration of Ecoli (J5) in alum protects against enteric septicemia of catfish.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine serum lactoferrin concentrations (SLFC) in neonatal calves before and after ingestion of colostrum and to develop models that predict SLFC as a function of colostral lactoferrin concentrations (CLFC) in calves.

Animals—13 Holstein calves.

Procedure—Calves were fed 4 L of colostrum via oroesophageal feeder within 3 hours after birth. Serum samples were collected before ingestion of colostrum (day 0) and 2, 4, 6, and 7 days after birth. Colostrum and serum IgG concentrations were measured by use of radial immunodiffusion. The CLFC and SLFC were determined by use of an ELISA.

Results—Mean ± SD SLFC on days 0, 2, 4, 6, and 7 were 2.5 ± 1.6 (range 0.47 to 7.1), 6.0 ± 3.0 (range 2.0 to 16.6), 12.0 ± 12.4 (range 0.0 to 43.5), 17.1 ± 13.6 (range 2.2 to 39.4), and 13.6 ± 16.4 (range 0.0 to 43.8) mg/ml, respectively. The SLFC on days 6 and 7 differed significantly from SLFC on day 0. The model that best estimated SLFC on day 6 predicted that (SLFC)2 was a function of the logarithm of relative efficiency of passive transfer (REPT) and ([CLFC]2 × [REPT]2), where R 2 = 0.4. The model for SLFC on day 7 predicted that (SLFC)2 was a function of log(REPT), where R 2 = 0.44.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Definitive evidence for passive transfer of lactoferrin via colostrum is lacking, because SLFC on day 2 or 4 were not significantly different than day 0. Relative efficiency of lactoferrin absorption was directly related to SLFC on day 6 but inversely related to SLFC on day 7. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:476–478)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association