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  • Author or Editor: Jean-Guillaume Grand x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of urinary bladder retroflexion (UBR) and surgical technique on postoperative complication rates and long-term outcome in dogs with perineal hernia.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—41 client-owned dogs with perineal hernia that underwent surgery between November 2002 and November 2009.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for information on dog signalment, history, physical examination findings, ultrasonographic findings, surgical techniques, intraoperative complications, duration of hospital stay, postoperative complications, and long-term outcome.

Results—31 dogs had no UBR, and 10 dogs had UBR. Internal obturator muscle transposition (IOMT) was performed in 20 dogs, and a cystopexy or colopexy was performed before the IOMT (LapIOMT) in 21. Postoperative complications included tenesmus (n = 8) and urinary incontinence (1). Rates of postoperative complications were not significantly different between the no-UBR and UBR groups or between the IOMT and LapIOMT groups. Thirty-two dogs were free of clinical signs at the time of the study. The median disease-free interval did not differ significantly between dogs in the no-UBR and UBR groups, but it was significantly lower in the LapIOMT group than in the IOMT group. None of the 7 dogs with UBR that were treated without cystopexy developed recurrence of UBR.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—UBR was not associated with an increased rate of postoperative complications relative to no UBR and had no effect on the long-term outcome in dogs with perineal hernia. The use of IOMT alone may be recommended for clinical use because LapIOMT offered no clear advantage.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the urodynamic and morphologic effects of the administration of estriol alone and in combination with phenylpropanolamine on the lower portion of the urogenital tract in female dogs.

Animals—3 sexually intact and 3 spayed female Beagles without urinary incontinence.

Procedure—Dogs received estriol (2 mg, PO) once daily for 7 days followed by estriol (2 mg, PO) and phenylpropanolamine (1.5 mg/kg, PO) once daily for 7 days. Urethral pressure profilometry, diuresis cystometry, and vaginourethrography were performed before treatment (day 0) and at days 7 and 14. The maximum urethral pressure (MUP) and closure pressure (MUCP), urethral functional and anatomic profile lengths, integrated pressure (IP), plateau, distance before MUP, maximum meatus pressure, threshold pressure, threshold volume, compliance, urethral length, and vaginal length and width were measured.

Results—Before treatment, no urodynamic differences were observed between the 2 groups; however, vaginal length and width were significantly shorter in spayed dogs. Compared with day 0 values, estriol treatment significantly increased MUP, MUCP, and IP values at day 7, but at day 14, this effect decreased despite phenylpropanolamine administration. No morphologic changes from baseline were detected after either treatment in any dog.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Data suggest that estriol mainly acts on the urethral sphincter mechanism by increasing urethral resistance in sexually intact and spayed female dogs without urinary incontinence. Administration of estriol and phenylpropanolamine did not increase the urethral resistance more than estriol alone. The urodynamic effects of estriol in female dogs with urinary incontinence remain to be elucidated.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research