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  • Author or Editor: Janyce L. Cornick x
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Summary

We evaluated and characterized several anesthetic induction protocols used to facilitate intubation and anesthetic maintenance with isoflurane in 7 adult ostriches and 1 juvenile ostrich. Induction protocols included iv administration of zolazepam/tiletamine, iv administration of diazepam/ketamine with and without xylazine, iv administration of xylazine/ketamine, im administration of carfentanil or xylazine/carfentanil, and mask induction with isoflurane. General anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen for various procedures, including proventriculotomy (6 birds), tibial (1 bird) or mandibular (1 bird) fracture repair, and drainage of an iatrogenic hematoma (1 bird). Heart rate and respiratory rate varied greatly among birds. The arterial blood pressure values recorded from 6 of the birds during maintenance of general anesthesia were higher than values recorded for most mammalian species, but were comparable to values reported for awake chickens and turkeys.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

During a 3½-year period, cardiac arrhythmias were identified in 6 of 67 horses diagnosed with duodenitis/proximal jejunitis (dpj). Arrhythmias were detected by auscultation of irregular cardiac rhythm and subsequently were characterized by electrocardiographic evaluation. Arrhythmias included frequent second-degree atrioventricular block, ventricular ectopic depolarizations, and atrioventricular conduction disturbance. In 4 horses, arrhythmias resolved with recovery from the primary problem. One horse died suddenly 66 hours after admission, and another was euthanatized at 72 hours after admission.

Clinical and laboratory data from horses with dpj and cardiac arrhythmias (group l) were compared with findings for horses with dpj and without arrhythmias (group 2). Group-1 horses had significantly (P <0.05) higher serum bicarbonate concentration and serum creatine kinase activity.

Normal sinus rhythm returned in all 4 group-1 horses that recovered from dpj, suggesting a causal relationship between dpj and the arrhythmias. Two group-1 horses were necropsied, and both had myocarditis. The cause of these lesions was not determined.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine hemodynamic and metabolic effects of IV infusion of ATP-MgCl2 combination and maximal safe IV infusion rate in conscious horses.

Animals

6 adult female horses.

Procedure

All horses received an IV infusion of ATP-MgCl2 combination, beginning at a rate of 0.05 mg of ATP/kg of body weight/min, which was increased by 0.05 mg/kg/min increments at 10-minute intervals until a rate of 1.0 mg/kg/min was achieved. Data were collected prior to the start of the infusion, at the end of each infusion rate, and at 15-minute intervals for the next hour after discontinuation of the infusion. Measured or calculated hemodynamic variables included cardiac output, cardiac index, heart rate, stroke volume, systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances. Arterial blood gas tensions, CBC, plasma biochemical profiles, urine volume and specific gravity, and selected clinical signs of disease also were evaluated.

Results

Intravenous infusion of ATP-MgCl2 significantly increased cardiac output, decreased systemic vascular resistance, and caused mild pulmonary hypertension. Magnitude of the hemodynamic alterations was dependent on rate of infusion. Maximal safe infusion rate for these horses was 0.3 mg/kg/min. All horses became lethargic, and their appetites diminished during the infusion; 5 horses had mild signs of abdominal discomfort. Flank sweating was observed in all horses as infusion rate increased. Urine volume and specific gravity and hematologic, biochemical, and arterial blood gas alterations were detected during and after infusion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Intravenous administration of ATP-MgCl2 in healthy, conscious, adult horses caused various metabolic and hemodynamic alterations that were without appreciable detrimental effects. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1140–1147)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To quantify plasma and urine nitric oxide (NO) concentrations before and after low-dose endotoxin infusion in horses.

Animals

11 healthy adult female horses.

Procedure

Eight horses were given endotoxin (35 ng/kg of body weight, IV) over 30 minutes. Three sentinel horses received an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution over the same time. Clinical signs of disease and hemodynamic variables were recorded, and urine and plasma samples were obtained to measure NO concentrations prior to endotoxin infusion (t = 0) and every hour until postinfusion hour (PIH) 6, then every 2 hours until PIH 24. Blood for hematologic and metabolic analyses and for serum cytokine bioassays were collected at 0 hour, every hour until PIH 6, every 2 hours through PIH 12, and finally, every 6 hours until PIH 24.

Results

Differences in plasma NO concentrations across time were not apparent, but urine NO concentrations significantly decreased at 4 and 20 to 24 hours in endotoxin-treated horses. Also in endotoxin-treated horses, alterations in clinical signs of disease, and hemodymanic, metabolic, and hematologic variables were significant and characteristic of endotoxemia. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) concentrations were increased above baseline values from 1 to 8 hours and 1 to 2 hours, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Plasma and urine NO concentrations did not increase in horses after administration of a low dose of endotoxin, despite induction of an inflammatory response, which was confirmed by increased TNF and IL-6 values characteristic alterations in clinical signs of disease, and hematologic, hemodynamic and metabolic variables. (Am J Vet Res 1999:60:969-976)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine the cardiopulmonary and sedative effects of medetomidine hydrochloride in adult horses and to compare those effects with effects of an equipotent dose of xylazine hydrochloride.

Animals

10 healthy adult female horses.

Procedure

5 horses were given medetomidine (4 μg/kg of body weight, IV), and the other 5 were given xylazine (0.4 mg/kg, IV). Heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressures, pulmonary arterial blood pressures, and cardiac output were recorded, and sedation and ataxia scores were assigned before and every 5 minutes after drug administration for 60 minutes. Rectal temperature and blood gas partial pressures were measured every 15 minutes after drug administration.

Results

Arterial blood pressure was significantly decreased throughout the study among horses given medetomidine and was significantly decreased for 40 minutes among horses given xylazine. Compared with baseline values, cardiac output was significantly decreased 10, 20, and 40 minutes after administration of medetomidine and significantly increased 40 and 60 minutes after administration of xylazine. Despite the significant decrease in respiratory rate in both groups, results of blood gas analyses were not significantly changed over time. Ataxia and sedation scores were of similar magnitude for the 2 groups, but ataxia persisted slightly longer among horses given medetomidine. Horses resumed eating hay 10 to 55 minutes after drug administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Results suggest that equipotent low doses of medetomidine and xylazine induce comparable levels of ataxia and sedation and similar cardiopulmonary changes in adult horses. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1371–1376)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research