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  • Author or Editor: Jamie G. Anderson x
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Abstract

Lesions in the oral cavity of dogs can be erythematous, leukoplakic, or pigmented in coloration. The diagnosis of oral erosions, ulcers, and white lesions in contrast to pigmented lesions in veterinary practice can be challenging. The most benign-looking oral ulcers can be associated with local malignant or systemic disease. Many factors are important in the evaluation and correct diagnosis of oral lesions, including medical and drug history, description of the lesion, number of lesions, depth of the lesion, biopsy technique, and correct histologic interpretation. The goal of this paper is to create a decision tree to guide the classification and proper diagnosis of canine oral mucosal lesions.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Immune-mediated and autoimmune diseases of the skin often present with oral cavity involvement. Autoimmune subepidermal blistering diseases and pemphigus vulgaris are classic examples. While the primary lesions (vesicles and bullae) are relatively specific, these fragile lesions evolve rapidly into erosions and ulcers, which are lesion types that overlap with many diseases. Furthermore, some immune-mediated diseases such as severe adverse drug reactions, lupus diseases, canine uveodermatological syndrome, and vasculitis, may or may not involve the oral cavity, and often nonoral clinical manifestations are more diagnostic. In these situations, disease knowledge combined with signalment, lesion distribution, and history help to narrow the differentials. Surgical biopsy is required for confirmation in most diseases, while immunosuppressive treatments most typically involve glucocorticoids with or without nonsteroidal immunosuppressants.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Twenty-four healthy dogs > 8 years old were recruited. In each instance, arterial blood gas tensions were analyzed. The alveolar-to-arterial oxygen gradient (P[a-a]o 2) was calculated to assess adequacy of pulmonary gas exchange. Thoracic radiographs were evaluated to ensure lack of visible signs of pulmonary disease and that lung features were similar to those in aged dogs of previous reports. Unlike findings in aged human beings, arterial partial pressure of oxygen (Pao 2) was not decreased in this group of aged dogs (mean ± sd, 102.9 ± 7.8 mm of Hg). Similarly, P[a-a] o 2 also was not increased. The thoracic radiographic findings were consistent with those of previous reports of pulmonary changes in aged dogs. The extent of radiographic abnormalities and the Pa o 2 were not correlated.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research