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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the signalment, clinical features, and outcome for male horses with urethral rents following perineal urethrotomy (PU) or corpus spongiotomy (CS).

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 33 horses.

PROCEDURES Medical records of male horses examined because of hematuria or hemospermia caused by urethral rents that underwent PU or CS at a referral hospital between 1989 and 2013 were reviewed. Data regarding signalment, clinical features, urethroscopic findings, surgical treatment, and outcome were recorded. Long-term follow-up information was obtained by telephone interviews.

RESULTS Age of the study population ranged from 3 to 18 years. Nineteen geldings and 1 stallion were examined because of hematuria, of which 13 and 7 underwent PU and CS, respectively, at a mean of 56 days after onset of clinical signs. Thirteen stallions were examined because of hemospermia, of which 7 and 6 underwent PU and CS, respectively, at a mean of 193 days after onset of clinical signs. Hematuria resolved following 1 surgical procedure in all 17 horses for which long-term information was available. Of the 12 stallions for which long-term information was available, 7 had resolution of hemospermia after 1 PU or CS and 5 developed recurrent hemospermia that required additional PUs or CSs (n = 3) or primary closure of the urethral rent (2).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that PU and CS were reliable treatments for resolution of hematuria in male horses with urethral rents; stallions with urethral rents may require multiple PUs or CSs or primary closure of the rent for resolution of hemospermia.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate first-intention healing of CO2 laser, 4.0-MHz radiowave radiosurgery (RWRS), and scalpel incisions in ball pythons (Python regius).

Animals—6 healthy adult ball pythons.

Procedures—A skin biopsy sample was collected, and 2-cm skin incisions (4/modality) were made in each snake under anesthesia and closed with surgical staples on day 0. Incision sites were grossly evaluated and scored daily. One skin biopsy sample per incision type per snake was obtained on days 2, 7, 14, and 30. Necrotic and fibroplastic tissue was measured in histologic sections; samples were assessed and scored for total inflammation, histologic response (based on the measurement of necrotic and fibroplastic tissues and total inflammation score), and other variables. Frequency distributions of gross and histologic variables associated with wound healing were calculated.

Results—Gross wound scores were significantly greater (indicating greater separation of wound edges) for laser incisions than for RWRS and scalpel incisions at all evaluated time points. Necrosis was significantly greater in laser and RWRS incisions than in scalpel incision sites on days 2 and 14 and days 2 and 7, respectively; fibroplasia was significantly greater in laser than in scalpel incision sites on day 30. Histologic response scores were significantly lower for scalpel than for other incision modalities on days 2, 14, and 30.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In snakes, skin incisions made with a scalpel generally had less necrotic tissue than did CO2 laser and RWRS incisions. Comparison of the 3 modalities on the basis of histologic response scores indicated that use of a scalpel was preferable, followed by RWRS and then laser.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the efficacy and duration of effect for liposomal bupivacaine following perineural administration to the medial and lateral palmar digital nerves of horses.

ANIMALS

9 nonlame mares.

PROCEDURES

For each horse, 2 mL of liposomal bupivacaine (13.3 mg/mL; total dose, 53.2 mg or approx 0.11 mg/kg) or sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was injected adjacent to the medial and lateral palmar digital nerves at the level of the distal aspect of the proximal sesamoid bones of a randomly selected forelimb. Twenty-one days later, the opposite treatment was administered in the contralateral forelimb. A digital algometer was used to measure the mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) immediately before and at predetermined times for 48 hours after injection of each treatment. The mean MNT was compared between the 2 treatments at each measurement time.

RESULTS

The mean MNT for the liposomal bupivacaine-treated limbs was significantly greater (ie, the limb was less sensitive) than that for the saline-treated limbs between 30 minutes and 4 hours after treatment injection. Following liposomal bupivacaine administration, 1 horse developed mild swelling at the injection sites that resolved without treatment within 24 hours. No other adverse effects were observed.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that liposomal bupivacaine is another option for perineural anesthesia in horses. Further research is necessary to determine the optimal dose and better elucidate the duration of effect for the drug when used for palmar digital nerve blocks in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether clinically effective concentrations of methylprednisolone or triamcinolone can be achieved in the navicular bursa after injection of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) or triamcinolone acetonide (TA) into the distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) and whether clinically effective concentrations of these drugs can be achieved in the DIPJ after injecting the navicular bursa with the same doses of MPA or TA.

Animals—32 healthy horses.

Procedures—Horses in groups 1 through 4 received 40 mg of MPA in the DIPJ, 10 mg of TA in the DIPJ, 40 mg of MPA in the navicular bursa, and 10 mg of TA in the navicular bursa, respectively. Concentrations of corticosteroids that diffused into the adjacent synovial structure were determined.

Results—For group 1, injection of MPA into the DIPJ yielded a mean ± SD concentration of 0.24 ± 0.072 μg of methylprednisolone/mL in the navicular bursa. For group 2, injection of TA into the DIPJ yielded 0.124 ± 0.075 μg of triamcinolone/mL in the navicular bursa. For group 3, injection of MPA into the navicular bursa yielded 0.05 ± 0.012 μg of methylprednisolone/mL in the DIPJ. For group 4, injection of TA into the navicular bursa yielded 0.091 ± 0.026 μg of triamcinolone/mL in the DIPJ.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A clinically effective concentration of methylprednisolone or triamcinolone diffused between the DIPJ and navicular bursa after intra-articular or intrabursal injection, which would justify injection of the DIPJ with MPA or TA to ameliorate inflammation of the navicular bursa.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether palmar digital nerve (PDN) blockade in horses with a combination of dexmedetomidine and mepivacaine would block the response to mechanical force applied to the digit longer than would anesthetizing these nerves with mepivacaine alone or dexmedetomidine alone.

ANIMALS

8 mares with no signs of lameness.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized, crossover, blinded, experimental study, both PDNs of the same forelimb of each horse were anesthetized by perineural injection with either 30 mg mepivacaine alone, 250 µg of dexmedetomidine alone, or 30 mg mepivacaine combined with 250 µg of dexmedetomidine. Each horse received each treatment, and treatments were administered ≥ 2 weeks apart. The mechanical nociceptive threshold was measured at a region between the heel bulbs with the use of a digital force gauge before (baseline) and at 15-minute intervals after treatment.

RESULTS

The mean duration of sensory blockade of the digit was 2-fold longer when a combination of mepivacaine and dexmedetomidine was administered (371 minutes), compared with when mepivacaine alone was administered (186 minutes). Treatment with dexmedetomidine alone did not change the mechanical nociceptive threshold substantially from baseline and resulted in no clinical signs of sedation.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that relief from digital pain provided by perineural treatment with mepivacaine for PDN blockade can be extended by adding dexmedetomidine to the injectate.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effectiveness of preinduction hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) in ameliorating signs of experimentally induced endotoxemia in horses.

Animals—18 healthy adult horses.

Procedures—Horses were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 equal-sized treatment groups to receive normobaric ambient air and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HBOT and LPS, or HBOT and physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Horses were physically examined, and blood was obtained for a CBC and to determine concentration or activity of plasma tissue necrosis factor-α, blood lactate, and blood glucose before the horses were treated with HBOT and then intermittently for 6 hours after administration of LPS or physiologic saline solution.

Results—All LPS-treated horses developed signs and biochemical and hematologic changes consistent with endotoxemia. Treatment with HBOT significantly ameliorated the effect of LPS on clinical endotoxemia score but did not significantly improve other abnormalities associated with endotoxemia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The protective effect of HBOT was minimal, and results did not support its use as a treatment for horses prior to development of endotoxemia.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether therapeutic concentrations (> 0.5 to 1.0 μg/mL) of polymyxin B (PB) were achieved in the tarsocrural joint of horses when the drug was administered by IV regional limb perfusion (IV-RLP) via a saphenous vein at doses of 25, 50, and 300 mg and to describe any adverse systemic or local effects associated with such administration.

ANIMALS

9 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES

In the first of 2 experiments, 6 horses each received 25 and 50 mg of PB by IV-RLP via a saphenous vein with at least 2 weeks between treatments. For each treatment, a tourniquet was placed at the midmetatarsus and another was placed midway between the stifle joint and tarsus. Both tourniquets were removed 30 minutes after the assigned dose was administered. Blood and tarsocrural joint fluid samples were collected for determination of PB concentration before and at predetermined times after drug administration. In experiment 2, 4 horses were administered 300 mg of PB by IV-RLP in 1 randomly selected pelvic limb in a manner identical to that used in experiment 1.

RESULTS

For all 3 doses, the mean synovial fluid PB concentration was > 10 times the therapeutic concentration and below the level of quantification at 30 and 1,440 minutes after drug administration, respectively. No adverse systemic or local effects were observed following PB administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that IV-RLP of PB might be a viable alternative for treatment of horses with synovial infections caused by gram-negative bacteria.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of stacked wedge pads and chains applied to the forefeet of Tennessee Walking Horses on behavioral and biochemical indicators of pain, stress, and inflamation.

ANIMALS 20 Tennessee Walking Horses.

PROCEDURES Horses were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: keg shoes (control; n = 10) or stacked wedge pads and exercise with chains (10). Ten days before treatment application, an accelerometer was attached at the left metatarsus of each horse to record daily activity. Horses were exercised for 20 minutes daily, beginning on day -7. On day 0, exercise ceased, the forefeet were trimmed, and the assigned treatment was applied. From days 1 through 5, horses were exercised as before. Blood samples for measurement of plasma cortisol, substance P, and fibrinogen concentrations were collected on days -5, 1, and 5 before and after exercise and every 30 minutes thereafter for 6 hours.

RESULTS No significant differences in plasma concentrations of cortisol, substance P, and fibrinogen were detected between groups. Although lying behaviors changed after shoes were applied, these behaviors did not differ significantly between groups. Shoeing appeared to have altered behavior to a greater extent than did the type of treatment applied.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Application of stacked wedge pads and chains to the forefeet of horses for a 5-day period as performed in this study evoked no acute or subacute stress or nociceptive response as measured. Although these findings should not be extrapolated to the long-term use of such devices in Tennessee Walking Horses performing the running walk, the data should be considered when making evidence-based decisions relating to animal welfare and the use of stacked wedge pads and chains.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 5-month-old captive female striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) was evaluated because of lethargy, signs of depression, azotemia, and erythema of the skin around the eyes.

Clinical Findings—Antemortem diagnostic tests revealed renal disease but failed to identify an etiologic agent. A diagnosis of severe nonsuppurative interstitial nephritis was made on the basis of results of histologic examination of renal biopsy specimens.

Treatment and Outcome—The skunk was administered isotonic fluids SC daily and later every other day because of the handling-related stress. Because of the skunk's deteriorating condition, it was euthanized after 24 days of supportive care. Aleutian disease was diagnosed on the basis of positive results of a PCR assay that targeted the DNA from Aleutian disease virus (ADV); positive results for ADV were also obtained by use of plasma counterimmunoelectrophoresis and an ELISA. Genetic sequencing of the 365-base pair PCR product revealed 90% sequence identity with mink ADV.

Clinical Relevance—In the skunk of this report, infection with a skunk-specific parvovirus resulted in clinical signs and pathologic changes similar to those associated with ADV infection in mink. For skunks with signs of renal failure, differential diagnoses should include parvovirus infection. In confirmed cases of infection with this ADV-like virus, appropriate quarantine and biosecurity measures should be in place to prevent spread to other susceptible animals within a zoological collection.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association