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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 in the cornea, eyelid, and third eyelid of healthy horses and those affected with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by use of immunohistochemical techniques.

Animals—15 horses with SCC involving ocular tissues and 5 unaffected control horses.

Procedures—SCC-affected tissues were obtained from the cornea (n = 5 horses), eyelid (5), and third eyelid (5). Site-matched control tissues were obtained from 5 horses unaffected with SCC. Tissue sections of affected and control cornea, eyelid, and third eyelid were stained immunohistochemically for COX-1 and COX-2 via standard techniques. Stain uptake was quantified by use of computer-assisted image analysis of digital photomicrographs.

Results—Immunoreactivity for both COX-1 and COX-2 was significantly greater in equine corneas with SCC than in control corneas. No significant differences in COX-1 or COX-2 immunoreactivity were detected in eyelid and third-eyelid SCC, compared with site-matched control tissues.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Immunoreactivity for COX-1 and COX-2 is high in equine corneal SCC, possibly indicating that COX plays a role in oncogenesis or progression of this tumor type at this site. Pharmacologic inhibition of COX may represent a useful adjunctive treatment for corneal SCC in horses.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 13-year-old llama was examined because of lethargy, inappetence, and syncope.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed muffled heart and lung sounds and peripheral edema. Clinicopathologic abnormalities included lymphopenia, hyperglycemia, prerenal azotemia, mild hyponatremia, mild hypoalbuminemia, and high γ-glutamyltransferase and creatine kinase activities. On ultrasonography, the liver appeared hyperechoic and ascites and pleural effusion were seen. Echocardiography revealed severe dilatation of the right atrium, right ventricle, and pulmonary artery; severe tricuspid regurgitation; and high right ventricular systolic pressure consistent with right-sided heart failure secondary to pulmonary hypertension.

Treatment and Outcome—Treatment with furosemide was attempted, but because of failing health, the llama was euthanized 4 weeks later. Macronodular cirrhosis of the liver, glomerulonephritis, and intimal fibrosis and medial hypertrophy of muscular pulmonary arteries were seen on histologic examination of postmortem specimens.

Clinical Relevance—Findings in this case were similar to those reported for human patients with portopulmonary hypertension secondary to hepatic cirrhosis. Pulmonary hypertension secondary to hepatic disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right-sided heart failure.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop protocols for helical computed tomography (CT) and axial high-resolution CT (HRCT) of lungs and correlate densitometric CT values with morphometric and histologic data for normal pulmonary tissue in dogs.

Animals—8 healthy adult dogs.

Procedure—2 dogs were used to establish a protocol for helical CT and HRCT of lungs. Six dogs were used to acquire densitometric CT data regarding normal lungs. After the dogs were euthanatized, their lungs were fixed and sampled for morphometric and histologic evaluation. Four CT acquisitions were compared by means of paired t tests.

Results—For normal lung tissue of dogs, mean densitometric CT value obtained during helical CT scans reconstructed in a sharp algorithm was -846 Hounsfield units. Values obtained via helical CT or HRCT acquisitions and reconstructed with sharp or standard algorithms did not differ significantly. Morphometric analysis was used to determine the proportion of lung parenchymal (82%) and nonparenchymal tissue (18%). Alveolar size, estimated by mean linear intercept, was approximately 172 µm, and alveolar surface area-to-volume ratio was 0.024 to 0.026 µm–1. Histologic evaluation confirmed the presence of normal lung tissue.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Correlation of densitometric CT data with morphometric and histologic findings and the establishment of helical CT and HRCT protocols were attained; clinical use of this information may facilitate investigation of pulmonary disease in dogs. Sharp helical CT acquisitions were preferred because of better lung parenchyma detail and rapid image acquisitions, compared with HRCT. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:935–944)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare quantitative densitometric computed tomography (CT), morphometric, and histologic data of normal lungs in dogs with similar parameters obtained after induction of an acute inflammatory response and determine whether CT densitometry correlated with histopathologic changes.

Animals—6 healthy adult dogs.

Procedure—After initial CT, 1 mL of 0.1M hydrochloric acid (HCl) and 3 mL of autologous blood were instilled into the right middle (RM) and caudal segment of the left cranial (LCCd) lung lobes, respectively. Immediately and 24 hours after instillation, CT was repeated. At 24 hours, dogs were euthanatized and lungs were fixed and sampled for morphometric and histologic evaluation. The CT data were compared with lung morphology and morphometry by use of unpaired t tests. Comparison with lungs from control dogs was performed using Spearman rank correlation coefficients.

Results—Mean Hounsfield units (HU) from control and baseline HU from experimental dogs were identical. Immediately after instillation of HCl or blood, there was increased attenuation in both lobes. Autologous blood initially induced severe changes that almost completely resolved at 24 hours; HCl induced severe changes at 24 hours. Significant increases in percentage of parenchymal airspace and alveolar diameter resulted in decreased surface area-to-volume ratio in lobes receiving HCl. Histologic scores were significantly higher in the RM lobe, compared with controls.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Computed tomography attenuation correlated well with histomorphometry and histologic findings in this model. Lung lesions after autologous blood were transient and of limited severity. Lesions induced by HCl were severe; alterations in morphometric and histologic parameters were reflected in CT attenuation measurements. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1114–1123)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare distributions of survivin among tissues from urinary bladders of dogs with cystitis, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), or histologically normal urinary bladders.

Sample Population—24 archived and 7 fresh-frozen specimens of urinary bladders from dogs with cystitis.

Procedures—Immunohistochemical analysis of archived tissue specimens was performed to identify survivin protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells by use of polyclonal rabbit anti-survivin antibody. Tissues that contained ≥ 5% immunoreactive cells were considered positive for survivin protein. Reverse-transcription PCR analysis was performed on fresh-frozen tissues to identify survivin mRNA. Data on tissues from dogs with TCC or histologically normal urinary bladders that were obtained during another study were used for statistical comparisons.

Results—Twelve of 24 (50%) cystitic tissues were positive for nuclear survivin, compared with 28 of 41 (68%) TCC tissues and 0 of 46 (0%) normal tissues. Two of 24 (8%) cystitic tissues were positive for cytoplasmic survivin, compared with 7 of 41 (17%) TCC tissues and 17 of 46 (37%) normal tissues. Proportions of specimens that contained nuclear or cytoplasmic survivin were significantly different between cystitic and normal tissues but not between cystitic and TCC tissues. Four of 7 cystitic tissues were positive for survivin mRNA, which was comparable with results for TCC and normal tissues.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Nuclear survivin was detected in TCC and cystitic tissues but not in normal urinary bladder tissues. Additional studies are needed to determine whether nuclear survivin contributes to the development or progression of TCC.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine immunoreactivity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -3, and -13 in cartilaginous tumors of dogs, correlate expression of MMP with histologic grade of tumors and clinical outcome of dogs, and compare MMP immunoreactivity between chondrosarcomas and chondromas.

Sample Population—Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from samples of naturally occurring chondrosarcomas (n = 31) and chondromas (8) of dogs that were submitted to our veterinary medical diagnostic laboratory.

Procedure—Histologic sections from each sample were stained with H&E and monoclonal antibody to MMP-1, -3, and -13 by use of an avidin-peroxidase immunohistochemical technique. For each section, histologic grade (I, II, or III) and immunohistochemical expression (0, 1, 2, or 3) were evaluated. Clinical outcome was obtained from medical records or interviews with referring veterinarians and scored as a good outcome, moderate outcome, or poor outcome. Correlations among variables and differences between chondrosarcomas and chondromas were analyzed.

Results—Samples from chondrosarcomas had significantly higher immunoreactivity of MMP-1 and -13, compared with immunoreactivity in samples from chondromas. In chondrosarcomas, a significant positive correlation (r, 0.386) was found between MMP-1 and -13 immunoreactivities, and a significant negative correlation (r, –0.390) was detected between MMP-3 and -13 immunoreactivities.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—A significant increase in expression of collagenases (MMP-1 and - 13) in chondrosarcomas, compared with expression in chondromas, suggests that collagenases may play an important role in tumor progression, and possibly metastasis, in chondrosarcomas of dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1285–1291)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the clinical and pathologic characteristics of mammary duct ectasia in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—51 dogs with mammary duct ectasia.

Procedure—Information regarding body condition, history, number and location of affected mammary glands, appearance of lesions, surgical treatment, nonsurgical treatment, and evidence of recurrence or development of mammary neoplasia was obtained from surveys sent to referring veterinarians. Results of information from examination of histologic sections and referring veterinarians were evaluated for all mammary duct ectasia biopsies performed between 1992 and 1999.

Results—Duct ectasia was the primary diagnosis in 51 of 1,825 (2.8%) mammary biopsy specimens and comprised 48% of nonneoplastic mammary diseases. Affected dogs were evenly distributed over a range of 1 to 13 years of age, with a mean age at the time of diagnosis of 6.1 ± 3.1 years. All dogs were female (31 sexually intact, 20 spayed); 10 of 26 had whelped. Duct ectasia was described as nodular (26 dogs), cystic (13), and multiglandular (11) and located in caudal (31) more often than cranial (14) or middle glands (10). Ectasia recurred in 3 dogs. One dog had a history of previously excised mammary adenocarcinoma; another subsequently developed mammary carcinoma.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Duct ectasia affected mature, sexually intact and spayed female dogs over a wide age range. Certain breeds were affected more commonly than expected. Increased risk for mammary neoplasia was not evident. Duct ectasia should be considered as a cause for mammary enlargement, especially in young dogs or when its cystic nature is evident. Mastectomy is usually curative, and neoplasia should be ruled out in dogs with ectasia. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1303–1307)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association