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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 10 horses with olecranon bursitis were reviewed to examine treatments, evaluate a technique for en bloc resection of the bursa in standing horses, and determine outcome of the horses after treatment. Before admission, 6 horses had been treated by needle aspiration of fluid from the mass, followed by injection of corticosteroids. Subsequent treatment for 2 of these 6 horses included open drainage and packing of the cavity with gauze soaked in 7% iodine solution. None resolved after these treatments.

After admission to the hospital, 5 horses were treated medically and 5 were treated by en bloc resection of the bursa. One horse that had received intralesional injection of a radionuclide was lost to follow-up evaluation. One horse treated conservatively by open drainage and packing and 1 treated by injection of a radionuclide had resolution of the olecranon bursitis. Only 1 of these 2 horses had a cosmetic result. The acquired bursae decreased in size in 2 horses (1 treated with a corticosteroid and 1 with orgotein), but were still visible 7 and 46 months after treatment, respectively.

The surgery site of 4 horses that were treated by en bloc resection healed by primary intention, and the owners of these horses were pleased with the cosmetic results. The suture line of 1 horse dehisced 5 days after surgery. Proliferative granulation tissue was removed on 2 occasions, and the site healed by second intention after 2 months. A small knot and some white hair remained at the surgery site.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A review of medical records was used to identify 10 horses in which stringhalt developed subsequent to trauma to the dorsal metatarsus. Six horses developed stringhalt within 3 months after injury, 3 horses developed stringhalt > 3 months after injury, and time from injury to stringhalt was unknown for 1 horse. Horses were treated with exercise, including daily hand-walking with pasture turnout, followed by lunging; or surgically, using lateral digital extensor myotenectomy. Of the horses treated with exercise, 1 had resolution of stringhalt, 2 improved but had residual stringhalt, and 1 had no change. Two of the horses having lateral digital extensor myotenectomy had resolution of stringhalt. Two of the remaining 3 horses treated surgically had varying degrees of improvement, and in 1 horse there was no change. Stringhalt is a potential complication following trauma to the dorsal metatarsal region. Potential causes include tendon adhesions enhancing tarsocrural joint flexion or abnormalities in the myotatic reflex caused by tendon injury that result in abnormal flexion of the tarsocrural joint.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Effects of the endophyte Acremonium coenophialum in tall fescue on pregnant mares and foal viability were evaluated. Twenty-two mature pregnant mares were randomly chosen to graze either Kentucky-31 tall fescue that was free from A coenophialum (endophyte-free, ef) or tall fescue infected with A coenophialum (endophyte-present, ep) after the first 90 days of pregnancy through parturition. Concentrations of pyrrolizidine and ergopeptine alkaloids were significantly greater in ep grass, compared with ef pasture. Ten of 11 mares grazing ep pasture had obvious dystocia. Mean duration of gestation was significantly greater for the ep group, compared with the ef group. Foal survivability was severely reduced among mares grazing ep fescue with only 1 foal surviving the natal period. Udder development and lactation were low in mares grazing ep grass. The absence of clinical problems in mares grazing ef grass implicated the endophyte as the causative agent of reproductive problems and perinatal foal mortality in pregnant mares grazing endophyte-infected fescue grass. Caution should be exercised in allowing pregnant mares to graze pastures infected with the endophyte A coenophialum.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research